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Encyclopedia > Impostor

An impostor is a person who pretends to be somebody else, often to try to gain financial or social advantages through social engineering, but just as often for purposes of espionage or law enforcement. Social engineering has several meanings: Social engineering (political science) Social engineering (computer security) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... For the band, see The Police. ...


Pretenders for various thrones used to be common. Numerous men claimed they were Dauphin, the heir to the French throne who disappeared during the French Revolution, and there were three false Dimitris who were serious pretenders for the throne of Russia. This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... False Dimitriy I (Cyrillic Лжедмитрий; other transliterations: Dimitry, Dimitri, Dimitrii) was the Tsar of Russia from July 21, 1605 until his death on May 17, 1606 under the name of Dimitriy Ioannovich (Cyrillic Димитрий Иоаннович). He was one of three impostors who claimed during the Time of Troubles to be the youngest son...


Very daring impostors may pretend to be someone else who really exists, although fast news media has made this rather difficult. Usually they just misrepresent their financial status, educational status, social status, family background or in some cases, their gender. Impostors are usually aware of not being who they say they are, however there are borderline cases who may have ended up believing their own tall tales. People may make false claims about their past or background without being full-blown impostors; non-existent military service seems common.


Many temporary impostors are criminals who maintain the façade for a time of a caper to defraud their victims (like Wilhelm Voigt). A police mugshot of Wilhelm Voigt Friedrich Wilhelm Voigt (February 13, 1849 - January 3, 1922) was a German impostor who masqueraded as a Prussian military officer in 1906 and became famous as the Captain of Köpenick (Hauptmann von Köpenick). ...


Others, like US prankster Joey Skaggs, do it as a prank or to make a point of some kind. The latter usually reveal the truth sooner or later. Some, like John Howard Griffin, have adopted other identity for purposes of research, investigation or experiment. Note that although impostors usually misrepresent their background, their intentions may not be criminal as such. They may wish to start anew with a new identity or "go native"; i.e. adopt identity and customs of other people. Joey Skaggs (born 1945) is a U.S. media prankster who has organized numerous successful hoaxes and other presentations. ... John Howard Griffin (June 16, 1920 - September 9, 1980) was a white journalist and author who wrote largely in favor of racial equality. ...


Sometimes women have masqueraded as men to obtain privileges only men can have or work in male-dominated professions. Some of them have fought as men at least in Napoleonic Wars and American Civil War. Sometimes, an organization or individual who has been fooled keeps quiet to avoid the embarrassment and therefore allows the impostor try the same thing elsewhere. Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] Holy Roman Empire[6] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[7] Saxony[8] Denmark [9] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Of course, the most successful impostors are those whose duplicity is never revealed so that we know nothing about them.

Contents

Notable impostors

Fraudsters

Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... Cassie L. Chadwick (October 10, 1857 _ October 10, 1907) is the most famous name of a Canadian-born woman who defrauded Cleveland, Ohio banks by claiming to be an illegitimate daughter of Andrew Carnegie. ... Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... David Hampton (1964-2003) was an African-American con artist who gained infamy in the 1980s after taking a group of wealthy Manhattanites for thousands of dollars by convincing them he was Sidney Poitiers son. ... Sir Sidney Poitier KBE, (IPA pronunciation: ) (born February 20, 1927), is an Academy Award-winning Bahamian-American actor, film director, and activist. ... Frederick Emerson Peters (1885-1959) was a US impostor who wrote bad checks masquerading as scholars and famous people. ... James Reavis James Addison Reavis (1843-1914), the self-styled Baron of Arizoniac, was an imposter of grand scale who claimed to own much of Arizona in the late 19th century. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Christophe Thierry Rocancourt (b. ... The name Rockefeller may refer to: // John D. Rockefeller, Sr. ... Tichborne Claimant was the 19th century case of Arthur Orton (1834-1898), an impostor who claimed to be missing heir Sir Roger Tichborne (1829-1854). ... A police mugshot of Wilhelm Voigt Friedrich Wilhelm Voigt (February 13, 1849 - January 3, 1922) was a German impostor who masqueraded as a Prussian military officer in 1906 and became famous as the Captain of Köpenick (Hauptmann von Köpenick). ... Lobsang Rampa, Cyril Hoskins, or both? Tuesday Lobsang Rampa is the name of a spirit of a Tibetan lama that a British man named Cyril Hoskins claimed had taken over his body. ... Tibet (older spelling Thibet; Tibetan: བོད་; Wylie: Bod; Lhasa dialect IPA: [; Simplified and Traditional Chinese: 西藏, Hanyu Pinyin: XÄ«zàng; also referred to as 藏区 (Simplified Chinese), 藏區 (Traditional Chinese), ZàngqÅ« (Hanyu Pinyin), see Name section below) is a plateau region in Central Asia and the indigenous home to the Tibetan people. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Frame from title video illustrating ballroom dancing scene. ...

Exotic impostors

A sketch of Princess Caraboo, by Edward Bird. ... Youree Dell Cleomili Harris (born August 12, 1962 in Los Angeles, California[1]), better known as Miss Cleo, is a self-proclaimed psychic. ... George Psalmanazar (1679-1763) George Psalmanazar (1679?-May 3, 1763) claimed to be the first Formosan to visit Europe. ... This article is about the history, geography, and people of the island known as Taiwan. ...

Royal impostors

Anastasia Manahan, usually known as Anna Anderson [1] (c. ... Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna (1901-1918) Grand Duchess Anastasia of Russia (Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanova, in Russian: Великая Княжна Анастасия Николаевна ) (June 18, 1901 – July 17, 1918) was the youngest daughter of Emperor Nicholas II of Russia and Empress Alexandra. ... Nicholas II of Russia (18 May [O.S. 6 May] 1868 – 17 July [O.S. 4 July] 1918) (Russian: , Nikolay II) was the last Emperor of Russia, King of Poland,[1] and Grand Duke of Finland. ... Alexis Brimeyer (1946-1995) was a false pretender who claimed connection to various European thrones. ... Harry Domela (1905-1978?) was a Latvian-born German impostor who pretended to be a deposed German crown prince. ... Eugenio Lascorz y Labastida (1886 -?) was a pretender who claimed connection to the royal house of the Byzantine Empire. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Eugenia Smith, of Chicago, also known as Eugenia Drabek Smetisko, (1899-31 January 1997) was the author of the Autobiography of HIH Anastasia Nicholaevna of Russia, in which she claimed to be Grand Duchess Anastasia. ... Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna (1901-1918) Grand Duchess Anastasia of Russia (Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanova, in Russian: Великая Княжна Анастасия Николаевна ) (June 18, 1901 – July 17, 1918) was the youngest daughter of Emperor Nicholas II of Russia and Empress Alexandra. ... Contemporary painting of Warbeck Perkin Warbeck (c. ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ... There are other articles with similar names; see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Charles Albert Stopford III (born c. ... Count Juan Raphael Dante (February 2, 1939- May 25, 1975) was a controversial figure in the American martial arts scene of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Mary Carleton (January 11, 1642 – January 22, 1673) was an Englishwoman who used false identities, such as a German princess, to marry and defraud a number of men. ... Fr. ... False Dimitriy I (Cyrillic Лжедмитрий; other transliterations: Dimitry, Dimitri, Dimitrii) was the Tsar of Russia from July 21, 1605 until his death on May 17, 1606 under the name of Dimitriy Ioannovich (Cyrillic Димитрий Иоаннович). He was one of three impostors who claimed during the Time of Troubles to be the youngest son... False Dmitry II (Russian: Лжедимитрий II), also called the thief of Tushino, was the second of three pretenders to the Russian throne who claimed to be the youngest son of Ivan the Terrible, tsarevich Dmitry. ... False Dmitriy III, also called Pseudo-Demetrius III (Russian: Лжедимитрий III), was the last and most enigmatic of three pretenders to the Russian throne who claimed to be the youngest son of Ivan the Terrible, tsarevich Dmitry. ... Ivan IV (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... False Margaret (or Margareth or Margareta) (c. ...

Academic impostors

  • Martin Hewitt, who became a university professor without real credentials.
  • James Hogue, who most famously entered Princeton University by posing as a self-taught orphan.
  • Marilee Jones, Dean of Admissions at MIT and a best selling author who claimed advanced degrees in science fields. After ten years in the post, she was revealed to have only a high school diploma.
  • Brian MacKinnon, who went back to being a teenager in order to re-enter medical school.
  • Azia Kim, who posed as a Stanford University student for eight months before finally being caught.

Martin Hewitt (1922-????) was a US impostor who became, among other things, a university physics professor. ... James Hogue (born 1960) is a US impostor who entered Princeton University by posing as a self-taught orphan. ... Marilee Jones (born June 12, 1951) is a former dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the co-author of the popular guide to the college admission process, Less Stress, More Success: A New Approach to Guiding Your Teen Through College Admissions and Beyond (American Academy... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Brian MacKinnon (b. ... Azia Kim is an imposter caught in late May 2007 for posing as a Stanford University freshman student for eight months. ...

People who "went native"

Portrait of Grey Owl (1936), by Yousuf Karsh. ... Chippewa redirects here. ... Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance was the name Sylvester C. Long (1890-1932) used after he had taken a mantle of an American Indian. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Iron Eyes Cody (left) shown with his frequent co-star Roy Rogers Iron Eyes Cody as the Crying Indian Iron Eyes Cody (April 3, 1907 – January 4, 1999) was an actor born in Kaplan, Louisiana. ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Chief Two Moon Meridas (1888? - 1933) was an US seller of herbal medicine who claimed that he was of Sioux birth. ... Jamake Highwater (b c. ... Carlos Castañeda (December 25, 1925 – April 27, 1998) was a Peruvian-born American author. ...

Multiple impostors

// Ferdinand Waldo Demara (1921- June 8, 1982), known as the Great Impostor, masqueraded as many people from monks to surgeons to prison wardens. ... Stanley Clifford Weyman (1890-1960), was an American multiple impostor who impersonated public officials, including Secretary of State and various military officers. ... Laurel Rose Willson (August 18, 1941 – April 2002) was an American woman from Washington who wrote alleged non-fiction under the alias Lauren Stratford and who later adopted the alias of Laura Grabowski. ... Satanism Associated organizations Church of Satan First Satanic Church First Church of Satan Prominent figures Anton LaVey | Blanche Barton | Peter H. Gilmore | Peggy Nadramia | Karla LaVey Associated concepts Left-Hand Path | Pentagonal Revisionism | Suitheism | Survival of the fittest | Might is Right Books and publications The Satanic Bible | The Satanic Rituals... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Frederic Bourdin (born 1974) is a French serial impostor the press has nicknamed the chameleon. According to himself, his lawyer and the press reports, Bourdin was raised by his grandparents in Paris and was later put into a childrens home. ... Barry Breman is an imposter who has posed as a Major League Baseball umpire in the World Series, a player in a Major League Baseball All Star Game, a player in an National Basketball Association All Star game, a referee in the National Football League, a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader, a... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... NLB may refer to: the National Library Board of Singapore the National Library for the Blind of the United Kingdom the New Lantao Bus Co. ...

Women who lived as men

Many women in history, who may not have been transgendered, have presented themselves as men in order to advance in typically male-dominated fields. See also: Crossdressing during wartime Transgender is generally used as a catch-all umbrella term for a variety of individuals, behaviors, and groups centered around the full or partial reversal of gender roles; however, compare other definitions below. ... Many people have engaged in crossdressing during wartime under various circumstances and for various motives. ...

James Barry (1795 – 25 July 1865) was a surgeon in the British Army. ... Frances Clalin was a woman who disguised herself as a man in order to fight in the American Civil War. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... Catalina de Erauso was a Basque woman, daughter and sister of soldiers from the city of San Sebastian, 1592. ... Languages Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religions Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: Euskaldunak) are an indigenous people[5] who inhabit parts of northwestern Spain and southwestern France. ... Dorothy Lawrence secretly posed as a man. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Deborah Sampson Gannett (December 17, 1760 - April 29, 1827) was the first known American woman to impersonate a man in order to join the army and take part in combat. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Mary Anne Talbot (1778-1808) was an Englishwoman who wore a male dress and became a sailor during the Napoleonic wars. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] Holy Roman Empire[6] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[7] Saxony[8] Denmark [9] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von... Billy Lee Tipton (December 29, 1914 - January 21, 1989) was a United States jazz pianist and saxophonist. ... Kelly Elizabeth Braadt (1991-2010) was a US woman who, according to her own account, took part in the American Civil War disguised as a male soldier named Harry T. Buford and served the Confederacy as a double agent. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Nadeshda Durova in officers uniform Nadezhda Andreyevna Durova (Russian: ) also known as Alexander Durov, Alexander Sokolov and Alexander Andreevich Alexandrov (1783, Kiev - March 21, 1866, Yelabuga ) was a woman who became a decorated soldier in the Russian cavalry during the Napoleonic wars. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] Holy Roman Empire[6] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[7] Saxony[8] Denmark [9] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von... Oil painting on silk, Hua Mulan Goes to War Hua Mulan (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is the heroine who joined an all-male army described in a famous Chinese poem known as the Ballad of Mulan. ...

Military Impostors

Joseph Anthony Cafasso, Jr. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... This article is about the U.S. Special Operations Force. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Wester Shadric Cooley (born March 28, 1932) is an American politician from Oregon. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Brian Dennehy in Death of a Salesman Brian Dennehy parodied in South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut Brian Dennehy (born July 9, 1938 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA) is an Irish-American actor who has appeared in movies, television shows, and stage productions. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... George Dupre is a Canadian man who falsely claimed to have been an SOE operative during World War II. In 1953 Quentin Reynolds, an ex-war correspondent, had written a book The Man Who Wouldnt Talk about George Dupres alleged wartime experiences. ... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Joseph John Ellis (1943- ) is a Pulitzer Prize - winning professor of history at Mount Holyoke College. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Jesse Macbeth Jesse Adam Macbeth (b. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Official force name 75th Ranger Regiment Rangers Other names Airborne Rangers Army Rangers Task Force Ranger U.S. Army Rangers Branch U.S. Army Chain of Command USASOC Description Special Operations Force, rapidly deployable light infantry force. ... Alan Mcilwraith posing as Captain Sir Alan Mcilwraith Alan Mcilwraith (born 3 March 1978) is a former call centre worker from Glasgow, Scotland who was exposed by a tabloid newspaper after passing himself off as a much-decorated British Army officer. ... A very large collections call center in Lakeland, FL. A call centre or call center (see spelling differences) is a centralized office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. ... “Glaswegian” redirects here. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Micah Ian Wright is an author who has worked in film, animation, video games, and comic books (Stormwatch: Team Achilles). ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Official force name 75th Ranger Regiment Rangers Other names Airborne Rangers Army Rangers Task Force Ranger U.S. Army Rangers Branch U.S. Army Chain of Command USASOC Description Special Operations Force, rapidly deployable light infantry force. ... Combatants United States Panama Commanders Carl W. Stiner Manuel Noriega Strength 27,684+ 16,000+ Casualties 24 Dead, 325 Wounded 450 Military, 514-4,000 Civilian Rangers from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment prepare to take La Comandancia in the El Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, December 1989. ... A covert operation is a military or political activity performed in secrecy that would break specific laws or compromise policy in another country. ...

Others

Bampfylde Moore Carew (born 1693, died 1759), was an English rogue, vagabond and imposter, who claimed to be King of the Beggars. ... This page is about the English county, for alternative meanings see Devon (disambiguation). ... The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular style of novel that originated in Spain and flourished in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries and has continued to influence modern literature. ... Look up vagabond in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée Éon de Beaumont (1728-1810), usually known as the Chevalier dEon was a French diplomat, soldier and Freemason who lived the first half of his life as a man and the second half as a woman. ... Robert Hendy-Freegard (born 1974) is a British barman, car salesman, conman and impostor who masqueraded as an MI5 agent and fooled several people to go underground for fear of IRA assassination. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Howard Griffin (June 16, 1920 - September 9, 1980) was a white journalist and author who wrote largely in favor of racial equality. ... Black Like Me Black Like Me (1961) - John Griffins travel book Black Like Me (1964) - movie version of Griffins book Black Like Me (1987) - different book by Jocelyn Emama Maximé ... Paul Jordan-Smith (1895–1971) was a journalist, editor, and bibliophile in Los Angeles, California. ... Disumbrationism was a hoax masquerading as an artistic school that was launched in 1924 by Paul Jordan-Smith, a novelist, Latin scholar, and authority on Robert Burton from Los Angeles, California. ... Ashida Kim is a Florida-based American martial arts teacher and author best known for his books on ninjitsu training. ... Ninjutsu ) started out as a set of survival skills that were used by groups of people who lived in Iga Prefecture of Japan. ... Louis de Rougemont (1847 – 1921) was a would-be explorer who claimed to have had adventures in the Pacific Ocean. ... Steven Jay Russell (born 1958) is a US con artist and impostor who has escaped from prison number of times. ... Brianna Stewart is the final name US woman Treva Throneberry (b. ... Martin Guerre was a French peasant who was at the center of a famous case of imposture in the 16th century. ... Title page of Arrest Memorable, an account of the case written by one of the trial judges in 1560 and published in 1565 For other uses, see Martin Guerre (disambiguation). ... Binjamin Wilkomirski was a name Bruno Grosjean / Dössekker (born 1941) adopted when he pretended to be a Holocaust survivor. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Books

  • Sarah Burton: Impostors - Six kinds of liar

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Impostor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1281 words)
Impostor (1953) is also the name of a short story by Philip K. Dick and of a 2002 film, starring Madeleine Stowe and Gary Sinise, that is based on the short story.
Impostors are usually aware of not being who they say they are; they are not the proverbial lunatics who think they are Napoleon.
Many temporary impostors are criminals who maintain the façade for a time of a caper to defraud their victims (like Wilhelm Voigt).
Impostor (144 words)
Impostor will claim to be fl, white, rich, poor, young, old, straight or gay, and if he's good he can pull it off - at least for a while.
Of course, there are sinister, even criminal reasons Impostor would lie about who he is, but more often he fakes it to lend weight to his arguments, or simply to amuse himself.
Impostor's requisite imagination and good writing skills can make him a formidable enemy, but even the best Impostors will eventually blunder and reveal their true identity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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