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Encyclopedia > Imperial unit

Imperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of units, first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. The units were introduced in the United Kingdom and its colonies, including Commonwealth countries (most have since become officially metric, use both Metric and Imperial), but excluding the then already independent United States. Systems of imperial units are sometimes referred to as foot-pound-second, after the base units of length, mass and time. English unit is the American name for a unit in one of a number of systems of units of measurement, some obsolete, and some still in use. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... The avoirdupois (IPA: ; French IPA: ) system is a system of weights (or, properly, mass) based on a pound of sixteen ounces. ... In physics and metrology, units are standards for measurement of physical quantities that need clear definitions to be useful. ... A Weights and Measures Act is an Act of Parliament determining trade law where the weight or size of the goods being traded are important. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...

The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England.
The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England.

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 790 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Imperial unit Units of measurement Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 790 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Imperial unit Units of measurement Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Relation to other systems

The distinction between the imperial system and the U.S. customary units (also called standard or English units) or older British/English units/systems and newer additions is often not drawn precisely. Most length units are shared between the imperial and U.S. systems, albeit partially and temporally defined differently. Capacity measures differ the most due to the introduction of the imperial gallon and the unification of wet and dry measures. The avoirdupois system applies only to weights; it has a long designation and a short designation for the hundredweight and ton. The term imperial should not be applied to English units that were outlawed in Weights and Measures Act of 1824 or earlier, or which had fallen out of use by that time, nor to post-imperial inventions such as the slug or poundal. Both the imperial and United States customary systems of measurement derive from earlier English systems. ... The U.S. customary units (more commonly known in the US as English units or standard units) are the non-metric units of measurement that are presently used in the United States, in some cases alongside the metric system of units. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The avoirdupois (IPA: ; French IPA: ) system is a system of weights (or, properly, mass) based on a pound of sixteen ounces. ... A Weights and Measures Act is an Act of Parliament determining trade law where the weight or size of the goods being traded are important. ... The slug is an English unit of mass. ... The poundal is a non-SI unit of force. ...


Although most of the units are defined in more than one system, some subsidiary units were used to a much greater extent, or for different purposes, in one area rather than the other.


Measures of length

Imperial standards of length 1876 in Trafalgar Square, London.
Imperial standards of length 1876 in Trafalgar Square, London.

After the 1 July 1959 deadline, agreed upon in 1958, the U.S. and the British yard were defined identically, at 0.9144 m to the international yard. Metric equivalents in this article usually assume this latest official definition. Before this date, the most precise measurement of the imperial Standard Yard was 0.914398416 m (Sears et al. 1928. Phil Trans A 227:281). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 619 KB) Imperial standards of length 1876 in Trafalgar Square, London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 619 KB) Imperial standards of length 1876 in Trafalgar Square, London. ... Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Table of length equivalent units
Unit Relative value to yard Metric value Notes
thou 136000 25.4 μm
inch 136 2.54 cm
foot 13 30.48 cm
yard 1 91.44 cm Defined as exactly 0.9144 metres since 1956.
furlong 220 ~201.2 m
mile 1760 ~1609 m
league 5280 ~4828 m No longer an official unit in any nation.
Maritime units
fathom 2[1] ~1.853 m

The fathom is not in use anymore. The British Admiralty in practice used a fathom as 6 feet. This was despite it being 11000 of a nautical mile (i.e. 6.08 feet) until 1970, when the international nautical mile of exactly 1852 metres was adopted. The commonly accepted definition of a fathom was always 6 feet. The conflict was inconsequential in determining depth as Admiralty nautical charts used feet as depths below 5 fathoms on older imperial charts. Today all charts worldwide are metric, except for USA Hydrographic Office charts, which use feet only for all depth ranges. A thou, also known as a mil, is a unit of length equal to one thousandth of an international inch. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... For other uses, see league. ... A fathom is the name of a unit of length in the Imperial system (and the derived U.S. customary units). ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ...

cable 202 +23 ~185.3 m One tenth of a nautical mile. When in use it was approximated colloquially as 100 fathoms.
nautical mile 2026 +23 ~1853 m Used to measure distances at sea. This value referred to the British nautical (Admiralty) mile of 6,080 ft; the modern international mile is slightly different. In practice the nautical mile was never converted to yards.
Gunter's survey units (17th century onwards)
link 22100 ~20.12 cm
pole 5 +12 ~5.029 m The pole is also called rod or perch.
chain 22 ~20.12 m

Until the adoption of the international definition of 1852 metres in 1970, the British nautical mile was defined as 6080 feet. It was not readily expressible in terms of any of the intermediate units, because it was derived from the circumference of the Earth (like the original metre). A cable length is a nautical unit of measure, for which at least four definitions seem to exist: Common definition: 1/10 nautical mile, i. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... A Gunters chain that belonged to John Johnson (1771-1841), Surveyor General of Vermont. ... As a unit of measurement within the Imperial system, the chain (surveyors chain, Gunters chain) is defined as 22 yards, 66 feet, or four rods. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... This article is about the unit of length. ...


Measures of area

Area
1 rood = 1 furlong × 1 rod[2] = 40 square rods = 12560 square mile = 10,890 sq ft = ~0.1012 ha = ~1012 m²
1 acre = 1 furlong × 1 chain = 160 square rods = 1640 square mile = 43,560 sq ft = ~0.4047 ha = ~4047 m²

A rood is an old English ( Anglo-Saxon) unit equal to quarter an acre, i. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ...

Measures of volume

In 1824, Britain adopted a close approximation to the ale gallon known as the imperial gallon. The imperial gallon was based on the volume of 10 lb of distilled water weighed in air with brass weights with the barometer standing at 30 in Hg at a temperature of 62 °F. In 1963 this definition was refined as the space occupied by 10 lb of distilled water of density 0.998 859 g/ml weighed in air of density 0.001 217 g/ml against weights of density 8.136 g/ml. This works out to 4.545 964 591 L, or 277.420 cu in. The Weights and Measures Act of 1985 switched to a gallon of exactly 4.546 09 L (approximately 277.4 cu in) [3]. 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pressure is the application of force to a surface, and the concentration of that force in a given area. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... The millilitre is the equivalent of a cubic centimetre. ...

Table of volume units
Unit Relative value to pint Metric value U.S. value Notes
fluid ounce (fl oz) 120 ~28.41 ml ~0.9608 fl oz
gill 14 ~142.1 ml ~4.804 fl oz
pint (pt) 1 ~568.2 ml ~1.201 pt Still the usual serving size for beer and cider, and the usual retail size for milk, in the UK.
quart (qt) 2 ~1.136 L ~1.201 qt
gallon (gal) 8 ~4.546 L ~1.201 gal Exactly 4.546 09 litres.

For a comparison to the U.S. customary system see the article on Comparison of the imperial and US customary measurement systems. A fluid ounce is a unit of volume in both the Imperial system of units and the U.S. customary units system. ... The millilitre is the equivalent of a cubic centimetre. ... The pint is an English unit of volume or capacity in the imperial system and United States customary units, equivalent in each system to one half of a quart, and one eighth of a gallon. ... For other uses, see Quart (disambiguation). ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... Both the imperial and United States customary systems of measurement derive from earlier English systems. ...


Measures of weight and mass

Britain has used three different weight systems in the 19th and 20th centuries:, troy weight, used for precious metals; avoirdupois weight, used for most other purposes; and apothecaries' weight, now virtually unused since the metric system is used for all scientific purposes. The 1824 Act made the Troy pound the primary unit of weight. Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals, black powder, and gemstones. ... The avoirdupois (IPA: ; French IPA: ) system is a system of weights (or, properly, mass) based on a pound of sixteen ounces. ... The apothecaries system of mass is an obsolete system formerly used by apothecaries (now called pharmacists or chemists) in English-speaking countries. ...


The use of the troy pound (373.241 721 6 g) was abolished in Britain on January 6, 1879, making the Avoirdupois pound the primary unit of weight.with only the troy ounce (31.103 476 8 g) and its decimal subdivisions retained. In all the systems, the fundamental unit is the pound, and all other units are defined as fractions or multiples of it. Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Decimal (disambiguation). ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Table of mass units
Unit Relative value to pound Metric value U.S. value Notes
grain 17000 ~64.8 mg
drachm 1256 ~1.771 g Known as a 'teenth' in some UK subcultures.
ounce (oz) 116 ~28.35 g
pound (lb) 1 ~453.6 g Exactly 453.592 37 grammes.
stone (st) 14 ~6.35 kg A person's weight is often quoted in stones or pounds in English-speaking countries.
quarter 28 ~12.7 kg A "quarter" was also commonly used to refer to a quarter of a pound in a retail context.
hundredweight (cwt) 112 ~50.8 kg 100 lb
ton (t) 2240 ~1016 kg 2000 lb 20 hundredweights in both systems, US hundredweight being lighter.

The British ton (the long ton), is 2240 pounds, which is very close to a metric tonne, whereas the ton generally used in the United States is the "short ton" of 2000 pounds (907.184 74 kg). Both are 20 hundredweights. Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A long ton is the name used in the US for the unit called the ton in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements, as used (alongside the metric system) in the United Kingdom and to some extent in other Commonwealth countries. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ...

Further information: Comparison of the imperial and US customary measurement systems

Both the imperial and United States customary systems of measurement derive from earlier English systems. ...

Current use of imperial units

A baby bottle that measures in three measurement systems—imperial (U.K.), U.S. Customary, and metric.
A baby bottle that measures in three measurement systems—imperial (U.K.), U.S. Customary, and metric.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1066 pixel, file size: 221 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A baby bottle that displays in all three measurement systems--Metric, Imperial, and U.S. Customary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1066 pixel, file size: 221 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A baby bottle that displays in all three measurement systems--Metric, Imperial, and U.S. Customary. ...

United States

The primary user of traditional 'English' units is the United States and to a lesser degree Burma and Liberia. In some of the U.S.-influenced Caribbean countries (like Antigua and Saint Lucia), the U.S. customary units, which are similar to imperial units based upon older English units and in part share definitions, are still in common use. The metric system (SI) has mostly replaced traditional units in other countries. This label, on a bottle of Head & Shoulders shampoo, illustrates the conflicted state of U.S. metrication in the early 21st century. ... West Indies redirects here. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... English unit is the American name for a unit in one of a number of systems of units of measurement, some obsolete, and some still in use. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


United Kingdom

British law now defines each imperial unit in terms of the metric equivalent. Metrication is the process of introduction of metric units for measurement. ...


The Units of Measurement Regulations 1995 require that all measuring devices used in trade or retail be capable of measuring and displaying metric quantities. This has now been proved in court against the so called 'Metric Martyrs', a small group of market traders who insisted on trading in imperial units only. Contrary to the impression given by some press reports, these regulations have never placed any obstacle in the way of using imperial units alongside metric units. Almost all traders in the UK will accept requests from customers specified in imperial units, and scales which display in both unit systems are commonplace in the retail trade. Metric price signs may currently be accompanied by imperial price signs (known as supplementary indicators) provided that the imperial signs are no larger and no more prominent than the official metric ones. The EU's deadline of December 31, 2009 to enforce metric-only labels and ban any supplementary indicators (imperial measurements) on goods after the deadline has been abolished. On May 9, 2007 the European Commission agreed to allow supplementary indications alongside the statutory metric indications beyond 2009. [4] The Metric Martyrs are a group of British food sellers and anti-metrication campaigners in the United Kingdom. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The United Kingdom completed its legal transition to SI units in 1995, but a few imperial units are still in official use: draught beer must be sold in pints, road-sign distances must be in yards and miles, and speed limits in miles per hour, therefore instruments in British-registered vehicles must be capable of displaying miles per hour. (Foreign vehicles, such as all post-2005 Irish vehicles, may legally have instruments displayed only in kilometres per hour.) Even though the troy pound was outlawed in Great Britain in the Weights and Measures Act of 1878, the troy ounce still may be used for the weight of precious stones and metals. The railways are also a big user of imperial units, with distances officially measured in miles and yards or miles and chains, and also feet and inches, and speeds are in miles per hour, although many modern metro and tram systems are entirely metric, and London Underground uses both metric (for distances) and imperial (for speeds). Metric is also used for the Channel Tunnel and on High Speed 1. Adjacent to Ashford International railway station and Dollands Moor International Freight Terminal, speeds are given in both metric and imperial units. The pint is an English unit of volume or capacity in the imperial system and United States customary units, equivalent in each system to one half of a quart, and one eighth of a gallon. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals, black powder, and gemstones. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ... The British terminal at Cheriton in west Folkestone, from the Pilgrims Way. ... 0 km London St Pancras Temple Mills Eurostar Depot 9 km Stratford International 10 km 21 km 27 km 30 km 32 km 37 km Ebbsfleet International 39 km 50 km 54 km 88 km 89 km 90 km Ashford International 91 km 106 km Dollands Moor Freight terminal 108...


The use of SI units is mandated by law for the retail sale of food and other commodities, but most British people still use imperial units in colloquial discussion of distance (miles) and speed (miles per hour). Milk is available in both half-litre and pint containers. Many people still measure their weight in stones and pounds, and height in feet and inches — but these must be converted to metric if recorded officially, for example on passports. Petrol is sometimes quoted as being so much per gallon, despite having been sold exclusively in litres for two decades. Likewise, fuel consumption for cars is still usually in miles per gallon, though official figures always include litre per 100 km equivalents. Fahrenheit equivalents are occasionally given after Celsius in weather forecasts, especially for high temperatures. The stone is a unit of mass in the Imperial system of weights and measures used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and most Commonwealth countries. ... Gasoline, as it is known in North America, or petrol, in many Commonwealth countries (sometimes also called motor spirit) is a petroleum-derived liquid mixture consisting primarily of hydrocarbons, used as fuel in internal combustion engines. ...


Canada

Main article: Metrication in Canada
See also: Canadian units of measurement

In Canada, the government's efforts to implement the metric system were extensive: almost any agency, institution, or function provided by the government uses SI units exclusively. In the 1970s, the metric systems and SI units were introduced. Imperial units were eliminated from all road signs, although both systems of measurement will still be found on privately-owned signs, such as the height warnings at the entrance of a multi-storey parking facility. Temperature is typically measured and reported in degrees Celsius. However some radio stations near the United States border (such as CIMX and CIDR), mainly or only use imperial units to report the weather. Environment Canada still has reports with an imperial units option beside the metric ones. The law requires that measured products (such as fuel and meat) be priced in metric units, although there is leniency in regards to fruits and vegetables. The metrication logo used in Canada during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Canadian units of measurement are traditional weights and measures used in Canada. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... CIMX is the call sign of a radio station based in Windsor, Ontario. ... CIDR is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 93. ... Environment Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and conservation of wildlife. ...


Traditional units persist in ordinary conversation. Few Canadians would use SI units to describe their weight and height, although drivers' licences use SI units. In livestock auction markets, cattle are sold in dollars per hundredweight (short), whereas hogs are sold in dollars per hundred kilograms. Land is surveyed and registered in metric units, but imperial units still dominate in recipes, construction, house renovation and gardening talk. Hundred weight or hundredweight is a unit of measurement for mass in both the system of measurement used in the United Kingdom (and previously throughout the British Commonwealth), and in the system used in the United States. ...


One area where imperial units are still in common use is in firearms and ammunition. Imperial measures are still used in the description of cartridge types, even where the cartridge is of relatively recent invention (e.g. 0.204 Ruger, 0.17 HMR, where the caliber is expressed in decimal fractions of an inch). However, ammunition which is classified in metric already is still kept metric (e.g. 9 mm, 7.62 mm). In the manufacture of ammunition, bullet and powder weights are expressed in terms of imperial grains.


See also

The board foot is a specialized unit of volume for measuring lumber in the United States. ... In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (weight), by volume, or by count. ... Conversion of units refers to conversion factors between different units of measurement for the same quantity. ... The cord is a unit of dry volume used in Canada and in the United States to measure firewood. ... Some human-referenced units of measurement Units of measurement were among the earliest tools invented by humans. ... Metrication or metrification refers to the introduction of the SI metric system as the international standard for physical measurements—a long-term series of independent and systematic conversions from the various separate local systems of weights and measures. ... Measurement is the determination of the size or magnitude of something. ... A system of measurement is a set of units which can be used to specify anything which can be measured and were historically important, regulated and defined because of trade and internal commerce. ... The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... “SI” redirects here. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The metre-tonne-second or mts system of units is a system of physical units introduced in the Soviet Union in 1933, but abolished in 1955. ... The unit kilogram-force (kgf, often just kg) or kilopond (kp) is defined as the force exerted by one kilogram of mass in standard Earth gravity. ... In physics, natural units are physical units of measurement defined in terms of universal physical constants in such a manner that some chosen physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of a particular set of natural units. ... In physics, especially in the general theory of relativity, geometrized units or geometric units constitute a physical unit system in which all physical quantities are identified with geometric quantities such as areas, lengths, dimensionless numbers, path curvatures, or sectional curvatures. ... In physics, Planck units are physical units of measurement defined exclusively in terms of the five universal physical constants shown in the table below in such a manner that all of these physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of these units. ... In physics, natural units are physical units of measurement defined in terms of universal physical constants in such a manner that some chosen physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of a particular set of natural units. ... In physics, natural units are physical units of measurement defined in terms of universal physical constants in such a manner that some chosen physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of a particular set of natural units. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... In physics, natural units are physical units of measurement defined in terms of universal physical constants in such a manner that some chosen physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of a particular set of natural units. ... In physics, natural units are physical units of measurement defined in terms of universal physical constants in such a manner that some chosen physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of a particular set of natural units. ... The avoirdupois (IPA: ; French IPA: ) system is a system of weights (or, properly, mass) based on a pound of sixteen ounces. ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals, black powder, and gemstones. ... The apothecaries system of mass is an obsolete system formerly used by apothecaries (now called pharmacists or chemists) in English-speaking countries. ... English unit is the American name for a unit in one of a number of systems of units of measurement, some obsolete, and some still in use. ... Canadian units of measurement are traditional weights and measures used in Canada. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Dutch system was not standardised until Napoleon introduced the metric system. ... In Finland, approximate units of measure were derived from natural actions or objects such body parts, later standardised for the purpose of commerce. ... In France, before the decimalised metric system of 1799, a well-defined old system existed, however with some local variants. ... Germany had an indigenous system of German units of measurement prior to its adoption of the international metric system. ... In modern usage, metric is used almost exclusively in commercial transactions. ... As in the case of the Danes the Norwegians earliest standards of measure can be derived from their ship burials. ... Several native system of weights and measures were used in Scotland. ... There are a number of Spanish and Portuguese units of measurement of length or area that are now obsolete. ... In Sweden, a common system for weights and measures was introduced by law in 1665. ... Ancient Polish weights and measures included: Garniec [1] Grzywna [2] and [3] Kamień [4] Korzec [5] Krok [6] Kwarta [7] Kwartnik [8] Łan [9] Łaszt [10] Ławka [11] Łokieć [12] Łut [13] Morga [14] Pacierz [15] Piędź [16] Skojec [17] Staje [18] Stopa [19] Wiardunek [20] Zdrowaśka [21... The measures of the old Romanian system varied greatly not only between the three Romanian states (Wallachia, Moldavia, Transylvania), but sometimes also inside the same country. ... Obsolete Russian weights and measures were used in Imperial Russia and after the Russian Revolution until they were replaced in the Soviet Union by a metric system in 1924. ... Obsolete Tatar weights and measures were used by Tatars until 1924, when they were replaced in the Soviet Union by the SI units. ... Old Indian measures are still in use today, primarily for religious purposes in Hinduism and Jainism. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Chinese units (Chinese: 市制; Hanyu Pinyin: ; literally market system) are the customary and traditional units of measure used in China. ... Shakkan-hō ) is the traditional Japanese system of measurement. ... Taiwanese units of measurement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Minnan: Tâichoè) are the customary and traditional units of measure used in Taiwan. ... Ancient Greek weights and measures - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Roman system of measurement was built on the Greek system with Egyptian influences. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Weight Reduced to English troy-weight, the Hebrew weights were: Gerah (Lev. ... The Arabic system of measurement is based on the Persian system. ... Originally Ancient Mesopotamian weights and measures came from a collection of city states loosely organized by family, tribe and occupation. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Unusual units of measurement are sometimes used by scientists, especially physicists and mathematicians, and other technically-minded people such as engineers and programmers, as bits of dry humor combined with putative practical convenience. ... Mesures usuelles (French for customary measurements) were a system of measurement introduced to act as compromise between metric system and traditional measurements. ...

References

  1. ^ Though not exact this was the figure in use in practice.
  2. ^ Appendix C: General Tables of Units of Measurements (pdf). NIST. Retrieved on 2007-01-04.
  3. ^ Sizes.com
  4. ^ EU shelves ban on imperial measures (online) (English). Press Association/Guardian Unlimited (May 9, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  • Appendices B and C of NIST Handbook 44
  • Barry N. Taylor's NIST Special Publication 811, also available as a PDF file
  • 6 George IV chapter 12, 1825 (statute)

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Foot (unit of length) - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (412 words)
A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre.
The most commonly used foot today is the English foot, used in the United Kingdom and the United States and elsewhere, which is defined to be exactly 0.3048 metre.
The imperial foot was adapted from an Egyptian measure by the Greeks, with a subsequent larger foot being adopted by the Romans.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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