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Encyclopedia > Immigration to Canada
Demographics of Canada

Languages
Religion
Immigration
Indigenous peoples Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Demographics of Canada, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... There are a multitude of languages spoken in Canada, but only English, French and certain aboriginal languages have official status. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ...

Demographics
Cities

   Toronto
   Montreal
   Vancouver
Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ... Visible minorities of British Columbia in 2001. ... Albertas population has grown steadily for over a century The province of Alberta has enjoyed a relatively high rate of growth in recent years, due in large part to its burgeoning economy. ... Saskatchewan is the middle province of Canadas three prairie provinces. ... Manitoba is one of Canadas 10 provinces. ... Estimated population of Ontario : 12,541,400 (2005 est) Precentage of National Population : 38. ... Current Statistics Population: The current population of Quebec is estimated at 7 509 928 individuals (1 April 2004). ... New Brunswick is one of Canadas three Maritime provinces, and the only officially bilingual province (French and English) in the country. ... Demographics of the province of Prince Edward Island, Canada. ... Nova Scotia (Latin for New Scotland; Scottish Gaelic: ; French: ) is a Canadian province located on Canadas southeastern coast. ... Newfoundland and Labrador is a province of Canada, the tenth to join the Confederation. ... Yukon (formerly The Yukon Territory) is one of Canadas three territories, in the countrys extreme northwest. ... The Northwest Territories is a territory of Canada. ... Nunavut is a territory of Canada. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (852x698, 139 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Geography of Canada Same-sex marriage in Canada Egale Canada Same-sex marriage in Yukon Same-sex marriage... The urban areas identified below are defined by Statistics Canada with reference to continuous population density, ignoring municipal boundaries. ... In 2001, 42. ... In 2001, 22. ... In 2001, 49% of the Vancouver population were visible minorities. ...

Censuses

1666 (New France)
1871 · 1881 · 1891 · 1901
1911 · 1921 · 1931 · 1941
1951 · 1956 · 1961 · 1966
1971 · 1976 · 1981 · 1986
1991 · 1996 · 2001 · 2006
2011 Canada Census Records Census of Canada. ... The 1666 census of New France was the first census conducted in Canada (and indeed in North America). ... The Canada 1911 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 1996 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 2011 Census will be a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population on May 17, 2011. ...

Ethnic groups
   English French
   Scottish Irish
   German Italian
   Chinese Ukrainian
   First Nations Dutch
   Polish Other groups

Immigration to Canada is the process by which people migrate to Canada and become nationals of the country. As Canada is a relatively new country, a formal immigration process has not been around for very long. Nevertheless, people have been migrating to the geographic region of Canada for thousands of years, patterns varying. After 1947 domestic immigration law went through many major changes, most notably with the Immigration Act, 1976, and the current Immigration and Refugee Protection Act from 2002. English Canada is a term used to describe either: the anglophone residents of Canada or the Canadian provinces other than Quebec and, sometimes, New Brunswick, in which French is an official language of the provincial governments. ... A large portion of the Canadian population are of Scottish ancestry and they have had a large impact on Canadian culture from colonial times. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ... Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins of ancestors per census division. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada (other than as a child of a foreign diplomat), by birth abroad, when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen, or can be granted to a permanent resident who lives in Canada for three out of four years before applying for... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... A new Immigration Act in Canada was created in 1978 which was named the Immigration Act of 1976. ... Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) is an Act of the Parliament of Canada, passed in 2001 as Bill C-11, which replaced the Immigration Act of 1976 as the primary federal legislation regulating Immigration to Canada. ...


In Canada there are three categories of immigrants: family class (closely related persons), independent immigrants (admitted on the basis of skill, capital and labour-market requirements) and refugees. When processing applicants, immigration officers are instructed to give priority to persons seeking family reunification and to refugees.[citation needed] Independent applicants without family but with required skills or capital are considered next. Family reunification is a recognized reason for immigration in many countries. ...


Currently Canada is known as a country with a broad immigration policy which is reflected in Canada's ethnic diversity. According to the 2001 census by Statistics Canada, Canada has 34 ethnic groups with at least one hundred thousand members each, of which 10 have over 1,000,000 people and numerous others represented in smaller amounts. 13.4% of the population belonged to visible minorities: most numerous among these are Chinese (3.5% of the population), South Asian (3.1%), Black (2.2%), and Filipino (1.0%). The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ... Canadians of Asian ancestry comprise the largest visible minority in Canada, at almost 10% of the Canadian population. ... Black Canadian is a term used to identify a Canadian of African descent. ... Canadians of Filipino descent are typically of South-East Asian Malay descent, with various admixtures of Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Arab, Negrito bloodlines. ...


In 2004, Canada received 235,824 immigrants. The top ten sending countries, by state of origin, were People's Republic of China (37,280), India (28,183), Philippines (13,900), Pakistan (13,011), Iran (6,491), United States (6,470), Romania (5,816), United Kingdom (5,353), South Korea (5,351), and Colombia (4,600).[1]

Immigration and Births in Canada from 1850 to 2000
Immigration and Births in Canada from 1850 to 2000[2]

Contents

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

History

After the initial period of British and French colonization, four major waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-aboriginal peoples took place over a period of almost two centuries. The fifth wave is currently ongoing. Come to Stay, printed in 1880 in the Canadian Illustrated News, which refers to immigration to the Dominion. Today, there is a debate about immigrants who do not stay, but instead leave soon after securing citizenship. ... Canada was the second nation in the then British Commonwealth to establish its own nationality law in 1946, with the enactment of the Canadian Citizenship Act 1946. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty...


The first significant, non-aboriginal immigration to Canada occurred over almost two centuries with slow but progressive French settlement of Quebec and Acadia with smaller numbers of American and European entrepreneurs in addition to British military personnel. This wave culminated with the influx of British Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, chiefly from the Mid-Atlantic States. This article is about the Canadian province. ... Flag History  - Established 1604  - English conquest 1713 Acadia (1754) Acadia (in the French language lAcadie) was the name given to a colonial territory in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day New England, stretching as far south as Philadelphia. ... Loyalists (often capitalized L) were British North American colonists who remained loyal subjects of the British crown during the American Revolution. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ...


The second wave from Britain and Ireland was encouraged to settle in Canada after the War of 1812, which included British army regulars who had served in the war, by the colonial governors of Canada, who were worried about another American invasion attempt and to counter the French-speaking influence of Quebec, rushed to promote settlement in back country areas along newly constructed plank roads within organized land tracts, mostly in Upper Canada (present-day Ontario). This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council...


With the second wave Irish immigration to Canada had been increasing when the Irish Potato Famine occurred from 1846 to 1849 resulting in hundreds of thousands more Irish arriving on Canada's shores, although a significant portion migrated to the United States over the subsequent decades.[3] Of the 100,000 Irish that sailed to Canada in 1847, an estimated one out of five died from disease and malnutrition, including over five thousand at Grosse Isle.[4] Mortality rates of 30% aboard the coffin ships were common.[5][6] For other uses, please see Great Famine. ... Grosse Ile or Grosse Isle may refer to: Grosse Ile Township, Michigan Grosse Isle, Quebec, An island in Quebec where many Irish Immigrants to Canada were housed and site of the Grosse Isle Disaster. ... A coffin ship was the name given to the ships that carried Irish emmigrants escaping the effects of the potato famine. ...


By 1867, over 80% of immigrants arrived in Canada by steamer. Although overall out migration to the more populous United States has exceeded immigrants coming from the United States, there has been sustained immigration from the United States over last two centuries and short periods of heavier migration in addition to the loyalist settlement, for example during 19th century gold rushes to British Columbia and later the Yukon; land-seekers to the Prairies in the early 20th century and also during periods of political turmoil, for example the Vietnam War. During the 20th century, heavy waves of immigration, mostly from continental Europe peaked in 1910–1913 (over 400,000 in 1913) and again 1957 (282,000) making Canada a more multicultural country with substantial non-English or French speaking populations. For example, Ukrainian Canadians account for the largest Ukrainian population outside of the Ukraine and Russia. Periods of low immigration also occurred during the first and second wars, in addition to the Great Depression period. Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... This article is about the Canadian territory. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... A Ukrainian Canadian is a person of Ukrainian descent or origin who was born in or immigrated to Canada. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...

Come to Stay, printed in 1880 in the Canadian Illustrated News, which refers to immigration to the "Dominion".

Immigration since the 1970s until present has overwhelmingly been visible minorities from the developing world since restrictions on non-white immigration were altogether removed, starting when Lester B. Pearson was prime minister with the revised Immigration Act, 1967, and this continued to be official government policy under his successor, Pierre Trudeau. During the Mulroney government, immigration levels were increased further by the late 1980s which have been maintained with slight fluctuations since (225,000–275,000 annually). Image File history File links Come_To_Stay. ... Image File history File links Come_To_Stay. ... The Canadian Illustrated News was a weekly Canadian illustrated magazine published in Montreal from 1869-1883. ... Detail from the current Canadian $20 bank note, issued in 2004. ... Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ... Mike Pearson redirects here. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... Martin Brian Mulroney PC CC GOQ (predominantly known as Brian Mulroney) (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ...


Prior to 1885, restrictions on immigration were imposed mostly in response to large waves of immigration rather than planned policy decisions, but not specifically targeted at one group or ethnicity, at least as official policy. Then came the introduction of the first Chinese Head Tax legislation passed in 1885, which was in response to a growing number of Chinese working on the Canadian Pacific Railway. Subsequent increases in the head tax in 1900 and 1903 limited Chinese entrants to Canada. In 1923 the government passed the Chinese Immigration Act which excluded Chinese from entering Canada altogether between 1923 and 1947. For discriminating against Chinese immigrants in past periods, an official government apology and compensations were announced on June 22, 2006. The Chinese head tax was a fixed fee charged for each Chinese person entering Canada. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Canadian citizenship was originally created under the Immigration Act, 1910, to designate those British subjects who were domiciled in Canada. All other British subjects required permission to land. A separate status of "Canadian national" was created under the Canadian Nationals Act, 1921, which was defined as being a Canadian citizen as defined above, their wives, and any children (fathered by such citizens) that had not yet landed in Canada. After the passage of the Statute of Westminster in 1931, the monarchy thus ceased to be an exclusively British institution. Because of this Canadians, and others living in countries that became known as Commonwealth realms, were known as subjects of the Crown. However in legal documents the term "British subject" continued to be used. This article is about the Statute of Westminster relating to the British Empire and its dominions. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...


Canada was the first nation in the then British Commonwealth to establish its own nationality law in 1946, with the enactment of the Canadian Citizenship Act 1946. This took effect on 1 January 1947. In order to acquire Canadian citizenship on 1 January 1947 one generally had to be a British subject on that date, an Indian or Eskimo, or had been admitted to Canada as landed immigrants before that date. The phrase British subject refers in general to anyone from the United Kingdom, its colonies at the time, or a Commonwealth country. Acquisition and loss of British subject status before 1947 was determined by United Kingdom law (see History of British nationality law). The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The Canadian Citizenship Act is an Act of the Government of Canada, which came into effect on July 1, 1947, recognizing the definition of a Canadian, including reference to them being British subjects. ... This article concerns the History of British nationality law. ...


On 15 February 1977, Canada removed restrictions on dual citizenship. Many of the provisions to acquire or lose Canadian citizenship that existed under the 1946 legislation were repealed. Canadian citizens are in general no longer subject to involuntary loss of citizenship, barring revocation on the grounds of immigration fraud.


Statistics Canada has tabulated the effect of immigration on population growth in Canada from 1851 to 2001.[2] Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


Immigration rate

In 2001, 250,640 people immigrated to Canada. Based on the Canada 2001 Census total population of 30,007,094 people, immigration represented 0.834% population growth that year. On a compounded basis, that immigration rate represents 8.7% population growth over 10 years, or 23.1% over 25 years (or 6.9 million people). Since 2001, immigration has ranged between 221,352 and 262,236 immigrants per annum.[7] According to Canada's Immigration Program (October 2004) Canada has the highest per capita immigration rate in the world,[8] although statistics in the CIA World Factbook show that a number of city states and small island nations, as well as some larger countries in regions with refugee movements, have higher per capita rates.[9] The three main official reasons given for the high level of immigration are: The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ...

A. The social component – Canada facilitates family reunification.
B. The humanitarian component – Relating to refugees.
C. The economic component – Attracting immigrants who will contribute economically and fill labour market needs (See related article, Economic impact of immigration to Canada).

The level of immigration peaked in 1993 in the last year of the Progressive Conservative government and was maintained by Liberal Party of Canada. Ambitious targets of an annual 1% per capita immigration rate were hampered by financial constraints. The Liberals committed to raising actual immigration levels further in 2005. All political parties are now cautious about criticizing the high level of immigration. Family reunification is a recognized reason for immigration in many countries. ... The economic impact of immigration to Canada is a much-debated topic in Canada. ...


Immigrant population growth is concentrated in or near large cities (particularly Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal). These cities are experiencing increased services demands that accompany strong population growth, causing concern about the capability of infrastructure in those cities to handle the influx. For example, a Toronto Star article published on 14 July 2006 authored by Daniel Stoffman noted that 43% of immigrants move to the Greater Toronto Area and said "unless Canada cuts immigrant numbers, our major cities will not be able to maintain their social and physical infrastructures".[10] Opinions on how to address funding shortfalls vary, with others not citing immigration reduction as a solution. A public consultation by Mayor David Miller of Toronto, for example, emphasizes a better distribution of responsibilities among the three levels of government, and new funding models to address the concern.[11] Most of the provinces that do not have one of those destination cities have implemented strategies to try to boost their share of immigration. For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ...


According to Citizenship and Immigration Canada, under the Canada-Quebec Accord, Quebec has sole responsibility for selecting most immigrants destined to the province. Quebec has been admitting about the same number of immigrants as the number choosing to immigrate to British Columbia even though its population is almost twice as large.[12] The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for issues dealing with immigration and citizenship. ... The Canada-Quebec Accord is a legal agreement concerning immigration issues between the federal government of Canada and the provincial government of Quebec. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944...


Immigration categories

Canadian citizenship
Canadian nationality laws

Canadian nationality law
Canadian Citizenship Act 1946
History of Canadian nationality law Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada (other than as a child of a foreign diplomat), by birth abroad, when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen, or can be granted to a permanent resident who lives in Canada for three out of four years before applying for... The Canadian Citizenship Act is an Act of the Government of Canada, which came into effect on July 1, 1947, recognizing the definition of a Canadian, including reference to them being British subjects. ... Canada was the second nation in the then British Commonwealth to establish its own nationality law in 1946, with the enactment of the Canadian Citizenship Act 1946. ...

Classes of citizens

Canadian citizen
Permanent resident
Honorary citizenship
Refugee
Commonwealth citizen Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada (other than as a child of a foreign diplomat), by birth abroad, when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen, or can be granted to a permanent resident who lives in Canada for three out of four years before applying for... A Permanent Resident in Canada is someone who is not a Canadian citizen and who has been granted permission to live and work in Canada without any time limit on his or her stay. ... Raoul Wallenberg, the first honorary citizen of Canada. ... A Commonwealth citizen, formerly known as a British subject, is generally a person who is a national of any country within the Commonwealth of Nations. ...

Related topics

Oath of citizenship
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Immigration to Canada
Passport Canada
Lost Canadians
"Canadians of convenience"
The purpose of the Oath of Citizenship, as opposed to the Oath of Allegiance, is for new Canadian citizens to pledge their loyalty not only to the Sovereign, Queen Elizabeth II, as representative of the State, but also to the laws and customs of their new country. ... The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for issues dealing with immigration and citizenship. ... Cover of a Canadian Passport Passport Canada is an independent operating agency of the Government of Canada and Foreign Affairs Canada. ... The term Canadians of convenience became prominent in 2006 in conjunction with the evacuation of Canadian citizens from Lebanon during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict. ...

There are three main immigration categories:

Economic immigrants 
Citizenship and Immigration Canada uses several sub-categories of economic immigrants. The high-profile Skilled worker principal applicants group comprised 19.8% of all immigration in 2005.[7]
Family class 
Under a government program, both citizens and permanent residents can sponsor family members to immigrate to Canada.
Refugees 
Immigration of refugees and those in need of protection.

Under Canadian nationality law an immigrant can apply for citizenship after living in Canada for 1095 days (3 years) in any 4 year period.[13] A Permanent Resident in Canada is someone who is not a Canadian citizen and who has been granted permission to live and work in Canada without any time limit on his or her stay. ... Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada (other than as a child of a foreign diplomat), by birth abroad, when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen, or can be granted to a permanent resident who lives in Canada for three out of four years before applying for...


Illegal immigration in Canada

There is no credible information available on illegal immigration in Canada. Estimates range between 35,000 and 120,000 illegal immigrants in Canada.[14] James Bissett, a former head of the Canadian Immigration Service, has suggested that the lack of any credible refugee screening process, combined with a high likelihood of ignoring any deportation orders, has resulted in tens of thousands of outstanding warrants for the arrest of rejected refugee claimants, with little attempt at enforcement.[15] Unlike in the U.S., refugees claimants in Canada do not have to attempt re-entry to learn the status of their claim. Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ...


See also

  • Category:Immigration to Canada
  • History of Chinese immigration to Canada

This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Inflow of foreign-born population by country of birth, by year
  2. ^ a b Statistics Canada – immigration from 1851 to 2001
  3. ^ Public Health and Technology during the 19th Century
  4. ^ Irish Potato Famine Coffin Ships
  5. ^ Early Emigrant Letter Stories
  6. ^ Passenger List – Agnes, Cork Ireland to Quebec, 1847
  7. ^ a b Annual Immigration by Category, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, URL accessed 2 July 2006
  8. ^ Canada's Immigration Program (October 2004), Library of Parliament, URL accessed 13 July 2006
  9. ^ Field Listing – Net Migration Rate Central Intelligence Agency, The World Factbook 2002
  10. ^ When immigration goes awry, Toronto Star, 14 July 2006, URL accessed 5 August 2006
  11. ^ City of Toronto: Toronto Act
  12. ^ Annual Immigration by Province, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, URL accessed 2 July 2006
  13. ^ Becoming a Canadian Citizen, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, URL accessed 18 October 2006
  14. ^ Canadians want illegal immigrants deported: poll
  15. ^ James Bissett: Stop bogus refugees before they get in

The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for issues dealing with immigration and citizenship. ... CIA redirects here. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for issues dealing with immigration and citizenship. ... The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for issues dealing with immigration and citizenship. ...

External links

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is a list of Canada-related topics. ... Canada is a country of 32 million inhabitants that occupies the northern portion of the North American continent, and is the worlds second largest country in area. ... This is a brief timeline of the history of Canada. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... // Main article: Province of Quebec (1763-1791) In North America, Seven Years War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763. ... // Confederation Main article: Canadian Confederation Fathers of Confederation meet in Quebec City In the 1860s, in the wake of the American Civil War, the British were concerned with possible American reprisals against Canada for Britains tacit support of the Confederacy. ... A Canadian WWI recruiting poster // World War I Main article: Military History of Canada during WWI On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was assassinated, setting off a chain of events leading to World War I. By August 4, Britain had declared war on Germany and, as... // The Second World War brought many changes to Canada; the government was necessarily more centralized during the war, and it remained so afterwards. ... // Main article: Great Flag Debate Diefenbaker was succeeded by Pearson in 1963, at a time of increasing political unrest in much of the Western world. ... // The New constitution Main article: Patriation In 1982 Britain passed the Canada Act, repatriating the Constitution of Canada. ... // Chretien years and the 1995 referendum Jean Chrétien became prime minister in the 1993 election, pledging to repeal the GST, which proved to be unfeasible due to the economic circumstances at the time. ... The politics of Canada function within a framework of constitutional monarchy and a federal system of parliamentary government with strong democratic traditions. ... The Canadian legal system has its foundation in the British common law system, inherited from being a part of the Commonwealth. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... Type Lower House Speaker Peter Milliken, Liberal since January 29, 2001 Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Peter Van Loan, Conservative since January 4, 2007 Opposition House Leader Ralph Goodale, Liberal since January 23, 2006 Members 308 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party Bloc Québécois... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Canada since Confederation. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... The Court system of Canada is made up of many courts differing in levels of legal superiority and separated by jurisdiction. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... Canadian Forces Flag The Canadian Armed Forces (Fr. ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... The Coast Mountains are the westernmost range of the Pacific Cordillera, running along the south western shore of the North American continent, extending south from the Alaska Panhandle and covering most of coastal British Columbia. ... The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ... Map of the Canadian Prairie provinces, which include boreal forests, taiga, and mountains as well as the prairies (proper). ... This article is about the region in Canada. ... Northern Canada, defined politically Northern Canada is the vast northernmost region of Canada variously defined by geography and politics. ... Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Central Canada, defined politically. ... a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Template:Geobox Mountain Range PIRRI WAZ NOT HERE AND DOESNT HAVE PS3 The Arctic Cordillera, sometimes called the Arctic Rockies, are a vast deeply dissected mountain range in northeastern North America. ... HI Eric u suck!!!!!!!!!!!!! from,Trevor and Dalton ... This article is about the Canadian region. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... This is a list of the extreme communities in Canada. ... Mount Logan in the Yukon is the highest peak of Canada. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The flora of Canada is quite diverse, due to the wide range of ecoregions and environmental conditions present in Canada. ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... The list of rivers in Canada is organized by drainage basin (new format) and province (old format to be removed). ... The north face of Mount Garibaldi rises above The Table and Garibaldi Lake Black Tusk viewed from the southeast Mount Fee as seen from its north side Mount Edziza in the Stikine Volcanic Belt as seen from the Stewart-Cassiar Highway Mount Garibaldi in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt as seen... Banking in Canada is one of the most efficient and safest banking systems in the world. ... For the defunct commercial bank, see Bank of Canada (commercial). ... C$ redirects here. ... This is a list of companies from Canada. ... Canadas health care system is a publicly funded health care system, with most services provided by private entities. ... Social programs in Canada include all government programs designed to give assistance to citizens outside of what the market provides. ... Demographics of Canada, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... There are a multitude of languages spoken in Canada, but only English, French and certain aboriginal languages have official status. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... A list of population of Canada by years. ... The table below lists the 100 largest metropolitan areas in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2001 Census[1] and the Canada 2006 Census. ... The urban areas identified below are defined by Statistics Canada with reference to continuous population density, ignoring municipal boundaries. ... The table below lists the 100 largest municipalities in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2006 census for census subdivisions. ... Bonhomme Carnaval, mascot of the Quebec winter carnival. ... The Gothic Revival Parliament Buildings are some of Canadas best known structures The architecture of Canada is, with the exception of that of the First Nations, closely linked to the techniques and styles developed in Europe and the United States. ... The following is a list of some important Canadian artists and groups of artists: Individuals Ran Andrews, 1956-, painter Robert Bateman, 1930-, painter Emily Carr, 1871-1945, painter Alex Colville, 1920-, painter Ken Danby, 1940-, painter Charles Daudelin, 1920-2001, sculptor and painter Paterson Ewen, 1925-2002, painter Marcelle Ferron... This is a list of well-known Canadians. ... Canadian national holidays (with provincial exceptions): Each province of Canada has its own provincial holiday or holidays. ... Skating on the Rideau Canal in Ottawa. ... Canadian literature may be divided into two parts, based on their separate roots: one stems from the culture and literature from France; the other from Britain. ... The history of music of Canada has mirrored the history and evolution of the country. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Celtic music is primarily associated with the folk traditions of Ireland, Scotland and Wales, as well as the popular styles derived from folk culture. ... The term classical music in this article refers to the western or European classical music tradition. ... Canadian hip hop developed much more slowly than Canadas rock music scene. ... Canada has been a source of rock and roll music for decades, beginning with Paul Anka who in 1957 went to New York City where he recorded his own composition, Diana. The song brought him instant stardom and went to No. ... The Flag of Canada Canadian nationalism is a loose term which has been applied to ideologies of several different types which highlight and promote specifically Canadian interests over those of other countries, notably the United States. ... Cultural protectionism in Canada has, since the mid 20th century, taken the form of conscious, interventionist attempts on the part of various Canadian governments to promote Canadian cultural production and limit the effect of foreign, largely American, culture on the domestic audience. ... The contemporary theatre scene in Canada revolves around companies and summer festivals based at facilities in Canadian cities. ... The Coat of Arms of Canada, formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada,[1] is the official coat of arms of the Canadian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially known... This is a list of flags used in Canada. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leafed), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... This is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... There are many symbols reflecting Canadas status as a constitutional monarchy, including those of the Monarch, or the vice-regal representatives. ...

 
 

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