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Encyclopedia > Immigration law
Legal status of Persons
Concepts

Citizenship
Nationality
Naturalization
Leave to Remain
Immigration
Illegal immigration
Statelessness Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... An immigration policy is any policy of a state that affects the transit of persons across its borders, but especially those that intend to work and to remain in the country. ... Image File history File links Wikitext. ... Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... In law legal status refers to the concept of individuals having a particular place in society, relative to the law, as it determines the laws which affect them. ... For other uses, see Person (disambiguation). ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A judge swears in a new citizen. ... The Leave to Remain is the legal status of a person issued by a government office of internal affairs to one who is not yet a citizen. ... Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ... It has been suggested that Stateless person be merged into this article or section. ...

Legal designations

Citizen
Native-born citizen
Naturalized citizen
Dual-citizen
Alien
Migrant worker
Refugee
Illegal immigrant
Political prisoner
Stateless person
Administrative detainee
“Citizen” redirects here. ... A native-born citizen or natural-born citizen of a country is a person who is legally recognized as that countrys citizen as of the moment of birth, rather than by acquiring citizenship afterwards through naturalization. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... Multiple citizenship is simultaneous citizenship in two or more countries (whether it is recognized by all countries or not). ... In U.S. law, an alien is a term Americans use for a person who owes political allegiance to another country or government and not a native or naturalized citizen of the land where they are found. ... Migrant farm worker, New York A migrant worker is someone who regularly works away from home, if they even have a home. ... Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ... A political prisoner is someone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image are deemed by a government to either challenge or threaten the authority of the state. ... A stateless person is someone with no citizenship or nationality. ... Administrative detention is a military term used in Israel to refer to political prisoners —people held as criminals while not actually being charged. ...

Social politics

Immigration law
Nationality law
Nationalism
Nativism (politics)
Immigration debate
Nationality law is the branch of a countrys legal system wherein legislation, custom and court precedent combine to define the ways in which that countrys nationality and citizenship are transmitted, acquired or lost. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Illegal immigration refers to a mass-immigration of people across national borders —in direct violation of the immigration laws of the country of destination. ...

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Immigration law refers to national government policies which control the phenomenon of immigration to their country.


Immigration law, regarding foreign citizens, is related to nationality law, which governs the legal status of people, in matters such as citizenship. Immigration laws vary from country to country, as well as according to the political climate of the times, as sentiments may sway from the widely inclusive to the deeply exclusive. Nationality law is the branch of a countrys legal system wherein legislation, custom and court precedent combine to define the ways in which that countrys nationality and citizenship are transmitted, acquired or lost. ... In law legal status refers to the concept of individuals having a particular place in society, relative to the law, as it determines the laws which affect them. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ...


Immigration law regarding the citizens of a country is regulated by international law. The United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights[1] mandates that all country|countries allow entry to its own citizens. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Certain countries may maintain rather strict laws which regulate the right of entry and internal rights once established: such as the duration of stay, the right to participate in government. Most countries have laws which designate a process for naturalization, by which immigrants may become citizens. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... A judge swears in a new citizen. ...

Contents

Immigration law in the UK

British Overseas Citizens have identical legal rights to British citizens - distinguished only in title. British citizenship can be obtained as of right for anybody who was born in Britain, or British overseas territory. It is also available as of right for people of whom one parent is a "British (or British Overseas)[2] citizen otherwise than by descent"[3].


EU citizens

EU citizens, as created by the Treaty of Rome art 17 have the right to work, provide services or self employment in the UK The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony Signatures in the Treaty The Treaty of Rome, signed by France, West Germany, Italy and Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) on March 25, 1957, established the European Economic Community (EEC). ...

See also: Citizenship of the European Union

Citizenship of the Union was introduced by the Maastricht Treaty signed in 1992. ...

Non-UK, Non-EU citizens

Immigration Law in the USA

Immigration law is a serious political issue in the USA, as the nation heads towards its 2008 Presidential Elections. Presidential electoral votes by state Whoever receives a majority of votes in the Electoral College will be the 44th President of the United States, and whichever vice presidential candidate receives a majority of votes will be the 47th Vice President of the United States, assuming that George W. Bush and...


See also

Since the new releases of laws in the United States, some to cause problems in transportanion and others so harsh that they cause deportation. The new law that immigrants cannot have licenses and cannot drive. This law is not considered an immigration las simply because it doesnt say not licenses to immigrants but its says no lisences to people without a Social Security Number. In many different cases there is one or two ways in which one can become legal in the United States. A person can either become married to a citizens and prove that there is legitimet love. The other way is to apply and hope that within the next millenium you are called upon to become a citizen. The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Illegal immigration refers to a mass-immigration of people across national borders —in direct violation of the immigration laws of the country of destination. ... 2000 Census Population Ancestry Map Immigration to the United States of America is the movement of non-residents to the United States. ...


By Omar Anguiano

Nationality law is the branch of a countrys legal system wherein legislation, custom and court precedent combine to define the ways in which that countrys nationality and citizenship are transmitted, acquired or lost. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For Microsoft Corporation’s “universal login” service, formerly known as Microsoft Passport Network, see Windows Live ID. For other types of travel document, see Travel document. ...

References

  1. ^ art 12(4)
  2. ^ British Nationality Act 1981, s15, as amended by the British Overseas Territories Act 2002 s1(1)(b) and s2(2)(b).
  3. ^ British Nationality Act 1981, s2(1)(a), subject to s14

External links

  • PoliticosLatinos.com Videos of 2008 US Presidential Election Candidates' Positions regarding Immigration

  Results from FactBites:
 
|| LIRS || FAQs -- Immigration Law (4853 words)
A lawful permanent resident cannot file an immigrant visa petition for a son or daughter who is married, regardless of the age of the son or daughter.
U.S. immigration law authorizes changes of status when a foreign national is in the U.S. Usually, Form I-539 or I-129 has to be filed to extend one’s status in the same non-immigrant visa category or to change one's status from one non-immigrant visa category to another.
A child born abroad of lawful permanent resident parents may enter the U.S. without a visa provided the child is accompanied by a parent upon that parent's initial return to the U.S. within two years of the child's birth with documentation showing the parent-child relationship.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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