FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Illinois" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Illinois
State of Illinois
Flag of Illinois State seal of Illinois
Flag of Illinois Seal
Nickname(s): Land of Lincoln; The Prairie State
Motto(s): State sovereignty, national union
Official language(s) English[1]
Demonym Illinoisan
Capital Springfield
Largest city Chicago
Largest metro area Chicagoland
Area  Ranked 25th in the US
 - Total 57,918 sq mi
(140,998 km²)
 - Width 210 miles (340 km)
 - Length 395 miles (629 km)
 - % water 4.0/ Negligible
 - Latitude 36° 58′ N to 42° 30′ N
 - Longitude 87° 30′ W to 91° 31′ W
Population  Ranked 5th in the US
 - Total 12,831,970[2]
 - Density 223.4/sq mi 
86.27/km² (11 in the US)
 - Median income  $45,787[3] (18)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Charles Mound[4]
1,235 ft  (377 m)
 - Mean 600 ft  (182 m)
 - Lowest point Mississippi River[4]
279 ft  (85 m)
Admission to Union  December 3, 1818 (21st)
Governor Rod Blagojevich (D)
Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn (D)
U.S. Senators Richard Durbin (D)
Barack Obama (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations IL US-IL
Website www.illinois.gov

The State of Illinois (pronounced /ˌɪlɨˈnɔɪ/|Ill-i-NOY) is a state of the United States of America, the 21st to be admitted to the Union. Illinois is the most populous and demographically diverse[5] Midwestern state and the fifth most populous in the nation. With Chicago in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and western Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a broad economic base. Illinois is an important transportation hub; the Port of Chicago connects the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River via the Illinois River. Illinois is often viewed as a microcosm of the United States; an Associated Press analysis of 21 demographic factors found Illinois the "most average state,"[6] while Peoria has long been a proverbial social and cultural bellwether. Illinois can refer to: Illinois, a state in the United States (population 12,419,293). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Illinois. ... Flag of Illinois The flag of the state of Illinois was designed in 1912 by Lucy Derwent in response to a contest held by the Daughters of the American Revolution. ... The Great Seal of the State of Illinois was first adopted in 1819 by the first Illinois General Assembly. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_IL.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Illinois ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Chicagoland is an informal name for the Chicago metropolitan area, used primarily by copywriters, advertising agencies, native residents, and traffic reporters. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Charles Mound is a gentle, 1,235-foot-high hill in northern Jo Daviess County, near the small town of Scales Mound and 11 miles northeast of Galena. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Pat Quinn (born 1948), is a United States politician from the state of Illinois. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Illinois to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... General Information Founded June 26, 1959 Coordinates (Iroquois Landing Terminal)  - Latitude  - Longitude 41°440 N 87°3142W Annual cargo tonnage 894,832 short tons (2002) Value of cargo handled Net Income $39. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about the river in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of reality. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... : Will it Play in Peoria? United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... The saying, Will it play in Peoria? is traditionally used to ask whether a given concept, product, person or event will appeal to mainstream America, or across a broad range of demographic/psychographic groups. ... This article is about Bellwethers in general. ...


Nearly 66% of the population resides in the northeastern corner of the state comprising the Chicago metropolitan area. 1 in 4 residents of the state live within the city of Chicago itself. Chicagoland redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


With a population near 40,000 between 1300 and 1400 AD, the Mississippian city of Cahokia, in what is now southern Illinois, was the largest city within the future United States until it was surpassed by New York City between 1790 and 1800. About 2,000 Native American hunters and a small number of French villagers inhabited the Illinois area at the time of the American Revolution.[7] American settlers began arriving from Kentucky in the 1810s; they achieved statehood in 1818. The future metropolis of Chicago was founded in the 1830s on the banks of the Chicago River, one of the only natural harbors on southern Lake Michigan.[8] Railroads and John Deere's invention of the self-scouring steel plow made central Illinois' rich prairie into some of the world's most productive and valuable farmlands, attracting immigrant farmers from Germany and Sweden. Northern Illinois provided major support for Illinoisans Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant during the American Civil War. By 1900, the growth of industry in northern cities and coal mining in central and southern areas attracted immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe, and made the state a major arsenal in both world wars. African-Americans migrating to Chicago from the rural South formed a large and important community, which created the city's famous jazz and blues cultures. The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Chicago River is 156 miles (251 km) long[1], and flows through downtown Chicago. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... railroads redirects here. ... John Deere This article is about John Deere, the person. ... John Deere the steel plow was awsome it was invented by John Deere and it was a major invention b/c the plow before would get stuck in the tough sod, so when he came out with the plow it just slid right through the dirt. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Swedish-Americans are the Americans with Swedish heritage, most often related to the large groups of immigrants from Sweden in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... The southern half of Europe is shown in shades of red. ... A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses. ... Chicagos Black Belt, April 1941. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on a pentatonic scale as well as a characteristic twelve-bar chord progression. ...

Contents

Etymology

See also: List of Illinois counties and List of Illinois county name etymologies

The state is named for the French adaptation of an Algonquian language (perhaps Miami) word apparently meaning "s/he speaks normally" (Miami ilenweewa,[9][10] Proto-Algonquian *elen-, "ordinary" and -we·, "to speak").[11] Alternately, the name is often associated with the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquian tribes that thrived in the area. The name Illiniwek is frequently (incorrectly) said to mean "tribe of superior men";[12] or "men". Both etymologies are unworkable. List of 102 counties in the U.S. state of Illinois: Adams County Alexander County Bond County Boone County Brown County Bureau County Calhoun County Carroll County Cass County Champaign County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Coles County Cook County Crawford County Cumberland County DeKalb County De... This is a list of Illinois county name etymologies. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... The Miami-Illinois language is a Native American language formerly spoken in the United States, primarily in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, and adjacent areas along the Mississippi River by the tribes of the Inoca or Illinois Confederacy, including the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Tamaroa, Cahokia, and Mitchigamea. ... Proto-Algonquian (commonly abbreviated PA) is the name given to the posited proto-language of the languages of the Algonquian family. ... There was much conflict with a neigboring tribe of aliens!The Illiniwek (also known as the Illini, Illinois, Illinois Confederacy) were a group of six Native American tribes in the upper Mississippi River valley of North America. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ...


Geography

Chicago, the largest city in Illinois and the Midwest, as viewed from the John Hancock Center
Chicago, the largest city in Illinois and the Midwest, as viewed from the John Hancock Center
Main article: Geography of Illinois

The northeastern border of Illinois is Lake Michigan. Its eastern border with Indiana is all of the land west of the Wabash River, and a north-south line above Post Vincennes, or 87° 31′ 30″ west longitude. Its northern border with Wisconsin is fixed at 42° 30' north latitude. Its western border with Missouri and Iowa is the Mississippi River. Its southern border with Kentucky is the Ohio River.[13] Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan.[14] Image File history File links Chicago_Skyline. ... Image File history File links Chicago_Skyline. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... For the tower in Boston, see John Hancock Tower. ... Illinois is in the north-central U.S. and borders on Lake Michigan. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Though Illinois lies entirely in the Interior Plains, it has three major geographical divisions. The first is Northern Illinois, dominated by the Chicago metropolitan area, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. As defined by the federal government, the Chicago metro area includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and stretches across much of northeastern Illinois. It is a cosmopolitan city, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a wide variety of ethnic groups. The city of Rockford generally sits along Interstates 39 and 90 and is the state's third largest city. The Interior Plains are highlighted in red. ... For the university, see Northern Illinois University Northern Illinois is a region generally covering the northern third of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Chicagoland redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... , Nickname: The Forest City Country State County Township Elevation 715 ft (218 m) Coordinates , Area 56. ... INTERSTATE JUNCTIONS JUNCTION EXIT # Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS Prev Next Interstate 39 (abbreviated I-39) is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 90 Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ...


Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of mostly flat prairie. Known as the Heart of Illinois, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. The western section (west of the Illinois River) was originally part of the Military Tract of 1812 and forms the distinctive western bulge of the state. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, as well as educational institutions and manufacturing centers, figure prominently. Cities include Peoria—the third largest metropolitan area in Illinois at 370,000—Springfield—the state capitalQuincy, Decatur, Bloomington-Normal and Champaign-Urbana.[14] State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... US Atlas of 1810 In May 1812, an act of Congress was passed which set aside bounty lands as payment to volunteer soldiers for the War against the British (War of 1812). ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Soy redirects here. ... : Will it Play in Peoria? United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... : Gem City United States Illinois Adams 14. ... Decatur is the largest city and the county seat of Macon County in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... This refers to the adjoined cities of Bloomington, Illinois and Normal, Illinois located in the McLean County of Central Illinois. ... Champaign is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. ... Urbana (pronounced ) is the county seat of Champaign County, Illinois, United StatesGR6. ...

Illinois, showing major cities and roads
Illinois, showing major cities and roads

The third division is Southern Illinois, comprising the area south of U.S. Route 50, and including Little Egypt, near the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. This region can be distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged topography (the southern tip is unglaciated with the remainder glaciated during the Illinoian Age and earlier ages), as well as small-scale oil deposits and coal mining. The area is a little more populated than the central part of the state with the population centered in two areas. First, the Illinois suburbs of St. Louis comprise the second most populous metropolitan area in Illinois with nearly 600,000 inhabitants, and are known collectively as the Metro-East. The second area is Williamson County, Jackson County, Franklin County, Saline County and Perry County. It is home to around 210,000 residents.[14] File links The following pages link to this file: Illinois Categories: National Atlas images | Illinois maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: Illinois Categories: National Atlas images | Illinois maps ... Little Egypt can mean: Little Egypt, a belly dancer. ... U.S. Route 50 is a major east-west route of the U.S. Highway system, stretching just over 3000 miles (4800 km) from West Sacramento, California east to Ocean City, Maryland on the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Little Egypt region of Illinois Little Egypt is the southern area of the state of Illinois in the United States of America. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... The Wolstonian glaciation is a name for an ice age period which occurred between 200,000 and 125,000 years ago. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Metro-East is a region in Illinois that comprises the eastern suburbs St. ... Williamson County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... Jackson County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... Franklin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Saline County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Perry County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ...


The region outside of the Chicago Metropolitan area is often described as "downstate Illinois". However, residents of central and southern Illinois view their regions as geographically and culturally distinct, and do not necessarily use this term.


In extreme northwestern Illinois, the Driftless Zone, a region of unglaciated and therefore higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state. Charles Mound, located in this region, has the state's highest elevation above sea level at 1,235 feet (376 m). The highest structure in Illinois is the Sears Tower with a roof elevation of approximately 2,030 feet (619 m) above sea level. [Chicago elevation (580 ft) + tower height (1450) = 2030.] // The Coulee Region, as it is colloquially known (officially designated the Driftless Area by the USGS and popularly referred to as the Driftless Zone, or Driftless Region since the 1980s) is an area of about 20,000 square miles (52,000 km²) in western Wisconsin, northeastern Iowa, southeastern Minnesota, and... Charles Mound is a gentle, 1,235-foot-high hill in northern Jo Daviess County, near the small town of Scales Mound and 11 miles northeast of Galena. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... The Sears Tower is a skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois. ...


The floodplain on the Mississippi River from Alton to the Kaskaskia River is the American Bottom, and is the site of the ancient city of Cahokia. It was a region of early German settlement, as well as the site of the first state capital, at Kaskaskia which is separated from the rest of the state by the Mississippi River.[15][14] Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles north of St. ... The Kaskaskia River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 320 mi (515 km) long, in central and southern Illinois in the United States. ... The American Bottom is a flood plain of the Mississippi River in southwestern Illinois, extending from Alton, Illinois, to the Kaskaskia River. ... Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... Kaskaskia is a village located in Randolph County, Illinois. ...


A portion of Southeastern Illinois is part of the extended Evansville, Indiana Metro Area, commonly referred to as the Tri-State with Indiana and Kentucky. Seven Illinois Counties are in the area. Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Vanderburgh Townships Center, German, Knight, Perry, Pigeon Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of Illinois

Because of its nearly 400 mile (640 km) length and mid-continental situation, Illinois has a widely varying climate. Most of Illinois has a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa) with hot, humid summers and cool to cold winters. The southernmost part of the state, from about Carbondale southward, borders on a humid subtropical climate (Koppen Cfa) with more moderate winters. Average yearly precipitation for Illinois varies from just over 48 inches (1,220 mm) at the southern tip to around 35 inches (890 mm) in the northern portion of the state. Normal annual snowfall exceeds 38 inches (96 cm) in the Chicago area, while the southern portion of the state normally receives less than 14 inches (35 cm).[16] The highest temperature recorded in Illinois was 117 °F (47 °C), recorded on July 14, 1954, at East St. Louis, while the lowest temperature was -36 °F (-38 °C), recorded on January 5, 1999, at Congerville.[17][15][14] The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... , Carbondale is a city in Southern Illinois in the midwest United States, about one hour north of Cairo. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Congerville is a village located in Woodford County, Illinois. ...


Illinois averages around 50 days of thunderstorm activity a year which put it somewhat above average for number of thunderstorm days for the United States. Illinois is vulnerable to tornadoes with an average of 35 occurring annually, which puts much of the state at around 5 tornadoes per 10,000 square miles (30,000 km²) annually.[18] The deadliest tornado on record in the nation occurred largely in Illinois. The Tri-State Tornado of 1925 killed 695 people in three states; 613 of the victims lived in Illinois.[19] A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Great Tri-State Tornado of Wednesday, March 18, 1925, crossed from southeastern Missouri, through southern Illinois, then into southwestern Indiana, and was the deadliest tornado in U.S. history. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Illinois Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Cairo[20] 41/25 47/29 57/39 69/50 77/58 86/67 90/71 88/69 81/61 71/49 57/39 46/30
Chicago[21] 30/14 35/19 46/28 58/38 70/48 79/57 84/63 81/62 74/54 62/42 47/32 34/20
Moline[22] 30/12 36/18 48/29 62/39 73/50 83/60 86/64 84/62 76/53 64/42 48/30 34/18
Peoria[23] 31/14 37/20 49/30 62/40 73/51 82/60 86/65 84/63 77/54 64/42 49/31 36/20
Rockford[24] 27/11 33/16 46/27 59/37 71/48 80/58 83/63 81/61 74/52 62/40 46/29 32/17
Springfield[25] 33/17 39/22 51/32 63/42 74/53 83/62 86/66 84/64 78/55 67/44 51/34 38/23

Recreation

See also: List of protected areas of Illinois

Illinois has numerous museums. The state of the art Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield is the largest presidential library in the country. And numerous museums in the city of Chicago are considered some of the best in the world. These include the John G. Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum of Natural History, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Science and Industry. The Museum of Science and Industry is the only building remaining from the 1893 Columbian Exposition held in Chicago to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of the new world. Illinois has over 54 state parks, along with many other wildlife areas and state forests. ... Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum looks at the life of the 16th U.S. President, Abraham Lincoln, and the course of the American Civil War. ... John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago in the United States is the largest indoor aquarium in the world. ... Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago The Field Museum of Natural History, in Chicago, Illinois, USA, sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as Museum Campus Chicago. ... The Art Institute of Chicago is a fine art museum located in Chicago, Illinois. ... A view from the lagoon behind the Museum of Science and Industry, the only in-place surviving building from the 1893 World Columbian Exposition and a National Historic Landmark. ... One-third scale replica of The Republic, which once stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds fair, was held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbuss...


The Illinois state park system began in 1908 with what is now Fort Massac State Park becoming the first park in a system encompassing over 60 parks and about the same number of recreational and wildlife areas. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Fort Massac is a colonial era fort on the Ohio River in Massac County, Illinois. ...


Areas under the protection and control of the National Park Service include the Illinois and Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor near Lockport, the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, the Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield, the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, and the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The location and course of the Illinois and Michigan Canal. ... Lockport is a city in Will County, Illinois, United States. ... In 1804, Meriwether Lewis & William Clark began a voyage of discovery with 45 men, a keelboat, two pirogues,and a dog. ... Lincoln Home National Historic Site Lincoln Home National Historic Site preserves President Abraham Lincolns Springfield, Illinois home and four-block historic district surrounding the home. ... The Mormon Trail or Mormon Pioneer Trail is the 1,300 miles (2,092 km) route that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traveled from 1846-1857. ... For other uses, see Trail of Tears (disambiguation). ...


History

Main article: History of Illinois

Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest county {{{LargestCounty}}} Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th in the US  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...

Pre-European

Copper plates found at pre-Columbian burial sites in Illinois.
Copper plates found at pre-Columbian burial sites in Illinois.

Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. That civilization vanished in the 15th century for unknown reasons. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, or Illini, a political alliance among several tribes. There were about 25,000 Illinois Indians in 1700, but systematic attacks and genocide by the Iroquois reduced their numbers by 90%.[26] Members of the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes came in from the east and north.[14] In the American Revolution, the Illinois and Potawatomi supported the American cause. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... Collinsville is a city in Madison County, Illinois and partially in St. ... There was much conflict with a neigboring tribe of aliens!The Illiniwek (also known as the Illini, Illinois, Illinois Confederacy) were a group of six Native American tribes in the upper Mississippi River valley of North America. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ... For the abbreviation or acronym SAC, please see SAC. The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language) are a group of Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ...


European exploration

French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. In 1680, other French explorers constructed a fort at he site of the nowaday’s city of Peoria, in 1682 a fort atop Starved Rock in nowaday’s Starved Rock State Park. As a result of this French exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. The small French settlements continued; a few British soldiers were posted in Illinois but there were no British or American settlers. In 1778 George Rogers Clark claimed the Illinois Country for Virginia. The area was ceded by Virginia to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory.[27] Father Jacques Marquette (French: Père Jacques Marquette) (June 10, 1637–May 18, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ... Louis Jolliet, also known as Louis Joliet (September 21, 1645 – May 22, 1700), was a Canadian explorer born in Quebec City. ... This article is about the river in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... : Will it Play in Peoria? United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Starved Rock State Park is an Illinois state park located in Utica, Illinois, in rural La Salle County, Illinois, about 75 miles (120 km) west-southwest of downtown Chicago. ... Wildcat Canyon Waterfall Sandstone cliff Starved Rock State Park is an Illinois state park located in Utica, Illinois, in rural LaSalle County, Illinois, about 75 miles (120 km) west-southwest of downtown Chicago. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... French settlements and forts in the Illinois Country in 1763, showing U.S. current state boundaries. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ...


19th century

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1800 2,458
1810 12,282 399.7%
1820 55,211 349.5%
1830 157,445 185.2%
1840 476,183 202.4%
1850 851,470 78.8%
1860 1,711,951 101.1%
1870 2,539,891 48.4%
1880 3,077,871 21.2%
1890 3,826,352 24.3%
1900 4,821,550 26.0%
1910 5,638,591 16.9%
1920 6,485,280 15.0%
1930 7,630,654 17.7%
1940 7,897,241 3.5%
1950 8,712,176 10.3%
1960 10,081,158 15.7%
1970 11,113,976 10.2%
1980 11,426,518 2.8%
1990 11,430,602 0.0%
2000 12,419,293 8.6%
Est. 2006 12,831,970 3.3%

The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809, with its capital at Kaskaskia. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. The new state debated slavery then rejected it, as settlers poured into southern Illinois from Kentucky. The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Illinois-Wabash Company land holdings included Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... Categories: Stub | Illinois history | U.S. historical regions and territories ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Kaskaskia is a village located in Randolph County, Illinois. ...


Thanks to Nathaniel Pope, the delegate from Illinois, Congress shifted the northern border 41 miles (66 km) north to 42° 30' north, which added 8,500 square miles (22,000 km²) to the state, including Chicago, Galena and the lead mining region. The capital remained at Kaskaskia, but in 1819 it was moved to Vandalia. In 1832 the Black Hawk War is fought in Illinois and nowaday's Wisconsin between the United States and several Indian tribes. Indians removed to Iowa, attempted to return, but were defeated by the U.S. militia and forced back to Iowa. Nathaniel Pope (January 5, 1784–January 22, 1850) was a politician and jurist from the U.S. state of Illinois. ... , Country State County Township Elevation 633 ft (193 m) Coordinates , Area 3. ... Madonna of the Trail statue in front of the Vandalia State House. ... For other uses, see Black Hawk War (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The winter of 1830-1831 is called the "Winter of the Deep Snow". A sudden, deep snowfall blanketed the state, making travel impossible for the rest of the winter. Many travelers perished. Several severe winters followed, including the "Winter of the Sudden Freeze". On December 20, 1836, a fast-moving cold front passed through, freezing puddles in minutes and killing many travelers who could not reach shelter. The adverse weather resulted in crop failures in the northern part of the state. The southern part of the state shipped food north and this may have contributed to its name: "Little Egypt", after the Biblical story of Joseph in Egypt supplying grain to his brothers.[28] is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Little Egypt region of Illinois Little Egypt is the southern area of the state of Illinois in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ...


By 1839 the Mormon utopian city of Nauvoo, located on the Mississippi River, was created, settled, and flourished. In 1844 the Mormon leader Joseph Smith was killed in the Carthage, Illinois jail. After close to six years of rapid development the Mormon city of Nauvoo, which rivaled Chicago as Illinois' largest city, saw a rapid decline. In 1846 the Mormons had left Illinois for the West in a mass exodus. This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Nauvoo (נאוו to be beautiful, Sephardi Hebrew Nåvu, Tiberian Hebrew Nâwû) is a city located in Hancock County, Illinois. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... Carthage is a city in Hancock County, Illinois, United States. ...


The state has a varied history in relation to Slavery and the treatment of African-Americans in general. Some slave labor was used before it became a territory, but Slavery was banned by the time Illinois became a state in 1818. The Southern part of the state, known as "Little Egypt", was largely settled by immigrants from the South, and the section was sympathetic to the South and slave labor. For a while the section continued to allow some slave labor on a migratory basis, but citizens were opposed to allowing Blacks as permanent residents. In the Illinois Constitution of 1848, reacting to such concerns, a provision was made for exclusionary laws to be passed. In 1853 John A. Logan, later a Union General in the American Civil War, introduced such bills and laws were passed to prohibit all African-Americans, including Freedmen, from settling in the state. [29] Slave redirects here. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... For other persons with similar names, see John Logan. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A freedman is a former slave who has been manumitted or emancipated. ...


Chicago gained prominence as a Great Lakes port and then as an Illinois and Michigan Canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city.[27] For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The location and course of the Illinois and Michigan Canal. ...


With the tremendous growth of mines and factories in Illinois in the 19th century, Illinois played an important role in the formation of labor unions in the United States. The Pullman Strike and Haymarket Riot in particular greatly influenced the development of the American labor movement. The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators Labor unions in the United States function as legally recognized representatives of workers in numerous industries. ... Pullman Strike began on May 11, 1894. ... The Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886 in Chicago is generally considered to have been an important influence on the origin of international May Day observances for workers. ... The labor movement (or labour movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments. ...

Further information: History of Chicago

Chicago, looking North from State and Washington Streets This article is about the history of Chicago, Illinois. ...

American Civil War

During the American Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments, which were numbered from the 7th to the 156th regiments. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also gathered, as well as two light artillery regiments.[30] Illinois infantry regimental flag (77th IL is shown) ROCHER MEANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAmerican Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Twentieth century

In the 20th century, Illinois emerged as one of the most important states in the union with a population of nearly 5 million. By the end of the century, the population would reach 12.4 million. The Century of Progress World's Fair was held at Chicago in 1933. Oil strikes in Marion County and Crawford County lead to a boom in 1937, and, by 1939, Illinois ranked 4th in U.S. oil production. A 1933 Century of Progress worlds fair poster The Century of Progress International Exposition was a Worlds Fair held in Chicago, Illinois from 1933-1934 to celebrate Chicagos centennial. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Crawford County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ...


Following World War II, Argonne National Laboratory, near Chicago, activated the first experimental nuclear power generating system in the United States in 1957. By 1960, the first privately financed nuclear plant in United States, Dresden 1, was dedicated near Morris. Chicago became an ocean port with the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway in 1959. The seaway and the Illinois Waterway connected Chicago to both the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. In 1960, Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald's franchise in Des Plaines. Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. ... The Eisenhower Locks in Massena, NY. The St. ... The Illinois waterway system is consisted of 336 miles of water. ... Ray Kroc (October 5, 1902 - January 14, 1984) took over and franchised the then single-restaurant McDonalds Corporation from 1955. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Incorporated City in 1925. ...


In 1970, the state's sixth constitutional convention authored a new constitution to replace the 1870 version. It was ratified in December. The first Farm Aid concert was held in Champaign to benefit American farmers, in 1985. The worst upper Mississippi River flood of the century, the Great Flood of 1993, inundated many towns and thousands of acres of farmland. It also flooded many homes and streets slowing transportational services.[27] Farm Aid started as a benefit concert on September 22, 1985, in Champaign, Illinois, held to raise money for family farmers in the United States. ... See also: Mississippi River The Upper Mississippi River is the portion of the Mississippi River upstream of Cairo, Illinois. ... The Great Flood of 1993 occurred in the American Midwest, along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers and their tributaries, from April to October of 1993. ...


Demographics

Illinois Population Density Map
Illinois Population Density Map
Demographics of Illinois (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 80.71% 15.73% 0.62% 3.84% 0.11%
2000 (Hispanic only) 11.78% 0.35% 0.19% 0.08% 0.04%
2005 (total population) 80.34% 15.63% 0.62% 4.45% 0.11%
2005 (Hispanic only) 13.72% 0.39% 0.20% 0.09% 0.04%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 2.30% 2.07% 3.74% 19.16% 10.13%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) -0.68% 1.81% 0.91% 19.36% 10.18%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 19.75% 13.28% 10.14% 9.96% 10.06%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

As of 2006, Illinois has an estimated population of 12,831,970, which is an increase of 65,200 from the prior year and an increase of 412,323, or 3.3%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 481,799 people (that is 1,138,398 births minus 656,599 deaths) and a decrease due to net migration of 71,456 people out of the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in an increase of 402,257 people, and migration within the country produced a loss of 473,713 people.[31] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x640, 35 KB) Summary Illinois population density map based on Census 2000 data. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x640, 35 KB) Summary Illinois population density map based on Census 2000 data. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...


As of 2004 there were 1,682,900 foreign-born (13.3%).[32]


At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. In 2000, 23.3% of the population lived in the city of Chicago, 43.3% in Cook County and 65.6% the counties of the Chicago metro area; Will, DuPage, Kane, Lake, and McHenry Counties as well as Cook County. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and in the rural areas that dot the state's plains. According to the 2000 census, the state population center was 41.278216° N 88.380238° W in Grundy County northeast of Mazon.[33][27][15][14] The Chicago metropolitan area is the metropolitan area associated with the city of Chicago in the United States. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Grundy County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... Mazon is a village located in Grundy County, Illinois. ...

Religious affiliation[34]
Christian: 80%
Protestant: 49%
Baptist: 12%
Lutheran: 7%
Methodist: 7%
Presbyterian: 3%
Other/general Protestant: 20%
Roman Catholic: 30%
Other Christian: 1%
Other religions: 4%
Non-religious: 16%

According to 2005 census, the racial distributions are as follows: 65.6% White American, 15.1% African-American, 3.9% are Asian, 2% other, and the remaining 13.2% are Hispanics or Latino of any race. Nearly three in ten whites in Illinois claimed at least partial German ancestry on the Census. African-Americans are present in large numbers in the city of Chicago, East St. Louis, and the southern tip of the state. Residents citing American and British ancestry are especially concentrated in the southeastern part of the state. Metropolitan Chicago has the greatest numbers of people of Irish, Mexican, and Polish ancestry. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... -1... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Presbyterianism is a family of Christian denominations within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... This article is about the color. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Asian may refer to: Asian people - The people from Asia. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ...


7.1% of Illinois' population was reported as under age 5, 26.1% under age 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51% of the population.[35][15]


According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 10.85% of the population aged 5 and older speak Spanish at home, while 1.60% speak Polish.[36] The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Religion

Catholics and Protestants are the largest religious groups in Illinois. However, Illinois is not as heavily Protestant as are neighboring states. Roman Catholics, who are heavily concentrated in and around Chicago, account for 30% of the population.[37] Chicago and its suburbs are also home to a large and growing population of Hindus, Jews, Muslims, and Sikhs. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ...


Economy

Illinois State Quarter
Illinois State Quarter
Main article: Economy of Illinois

The 2006 total gross state product for Illinois was nearly $589 billion USD,[38] placing it 5th in the nation. The 2004 per capita income was $34,721 USD.[39] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1119 × 1123 pixel, file size: 817 KB, MIME type: image/png) Source http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1119 × 1123 pixel, file size: 817 KB, MIME type: image/png) Source http://www. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... The economy of Illinois is highly diverse. ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


Illinois's state income tax is calculated by multiplying net income by a flat rate, currently 3%.[40] There are two rates for state sales tax: 6.25% for general merchandise and 1% for qualifying food, drugs and medical appliances.[41] The property tax is the largest single tax in Illinois, and is the major source of tax revenue for local government taxing districts. The property tax is a local—not state—tax, imposed by local government taxing districts which include counties, townships, municipalities, school districts, and special taxing districts. The property tax in Illinois is imposed only on real property.[27][15][14] Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... A civil township is a widely-used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a county. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Agricultural and industry

Illinois's agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products, and wheat. In most years Illinois is the leading state for the production of soybeans,[42] with a harvest of 500 million bushels (14 million metric tons) in 2004. Illinois is ranked second in total corn production.[43] Illinois' universities are actively researching alternative agricultural products as alternative crops. This article is about the maize plant. ... Soy redirects here. ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ...


As of 2003, the leading manufacturing industries in Illinois, based upon value-added, were chemical manufacturing ($16.6 billion), food manufacturing ($14.4 billion), machinery manufacturing ($13.6 billion), fabricated metal products ($10.5 billion), plastics and rubber products ($6.8 billion), transportation equipment ($6.7 billion), and computer and electronic products ($6.4 billion).[44] Important non-manufacturing industries include financial services, publishing, petroleum, and coal. Petro redirects here. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Energy

Illinois is a net importer of fuels for energy, despite large coal resources and some minor oil production. Illinois exports electricity, ranking fifth among states in electricity production and seventh in electricity consumption.[45]


Coal

About 68% of Illinois has coal-bearing strata of the Pennsylvanian geologic period. According to the Illinois State Geological Survey, 211 billion tons of bituminous coal are estimated to lie under the surface, having a total heating value greater than the estimated oil deposits in the Arabian Peninsula.[46] However, this coal has a high sulfur content, which causes acid rain unless special equipment is used to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions.[27][15][14] Many Illinois power plants are not equipped to burn high-sulfur coal. In 1999, Illinois produced 40.4 million tons of coal, but only 17 million tons (42%) of Illinois coal was consumed in Illinois. Most of the coal produced in Illinois is exported to other states, while much of the coal burned for power in Illinois (21 million tons in 1998) is mined in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming.[45] Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The Pennsylvanian is an epoch of the Carboniferous period lasting from roughly 325 Ma to 299 Ma (million years ago). ... Bituminous coal Bituminous coal is a relatively hard coal containing a tar-like substance called bitumen. ... Arabia redirects here. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The term acid rain is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, fog, dew, or dry particles. ... Sulfur dioxide (or Sulphur dioxide) has the chemical formula SO2. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... The Powder River Basin spanning the Montana — Wyoming border is the single largest source of coal mined in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...


Mattoon was recently chosen as the site for the Department of Energy's FutureGen project, a 275 megawatt experimental zero emission coal-burning power plant. Mattoon is a city in Coles County, Illinois, United States. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... FutureGen is a project of the US government to build a zero-emissions coal-fired power plant that produces hydrogen and electricity while using carbon dioxide sequestration. ... Zero emission refers to an engine, motor, or other energy source, that emits no waste products that pollutes the environment or disrupts the climate. ...


Petroleum

Illinois is a leading refiner of petroleum in the American Midwest, with a combined crude oil distillation capacity of nearly 900,000 barrels per day (143,000 m³/d). However, Illinois has very limited crude oil proved reserves that account for less than 1% of U.S. crude oil proved reserves. Residential heating is 81% natural gas compared to less than 1% heating oil. Illinois is ranked 14th in oil production among states, with a daily output of approximately 28,000 barrels (4,500 m³) in 2005.[47] For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Heating oil, or burning oil, also known in the United States as No. ...


Nuclear power

Nuclear power arguably began in Illinois with the Chicago Pile-1, the world's first artificial self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction in the world's first nuclear reactor, built on the University of Chicago campus. With six major nuclear power plants (Braidwood, Byron, Clinton, Dresden, LaSalle, and Quad Cities) housing eleven reactors, Illinois is ranked first in nuclear generating capacity among the 31 states with nuclear plants.[48] In 2005, 48% of Illinois' electricity was generated using nuclear power.[48] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 867 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Byron Nuclear Generating Station ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 867 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Byron Nuclear Generating Station ... The Byron nuclear power plant is located in Ogle County, Illinois. ... Ogle County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... This article is about applications of nuclear fission reactors as power sources. ... On December 2, 1942, the worlds first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction, Chicago Pile-1, took place on a squash court beneath Stagg Field on the University of Chicago campus. ... A schematic nuclear fission chain reaction. ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... A nuclear power station. ... The Braidwood nuclear power plant is located in Will County in northeastern Illinois. ... The Byron nuclear power plant is located in Ogle County, Illinois. ... The Clinton Power Station and is 5,000-acre cooling reservoir are located on a 14000-acre site near Clinton, Illinois, USA. Clintons final construction cost exceeded $4 billion, leading the plant to produce some of the most expensive power in the Midwest. ... Dresden, Illinois is the USA’s first Nuclear Power Plant ever built. ... -1... Quad Cities is a two-unit nuclear power plant located near Cordova, Illinois, USA on the Mississippi River. ...


Wind power

Illinois has seen growing interest in the use of wind power for electrical generation.[49] Most of Illinois is rated "fair" for wind energy production by the Department of Energy, with some western sections rated "good" and parts of the south rated "poor".[50] Currently, there are four major wind farms in Illinois; the two largest farms each have a production capacity over 50 megawatts. A number of larger projects have also been proposed.[51] Although it currently represents only a negligible part of Illinois' energy production, it is estimated that wind power could provide 5-10% of the state's energy needs.[52] An example of a wind turbine. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Wind turbines in Neuenkirchen, Dithmarschen (Germany). ... The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ...


Biofuels

Illinois is ranked second in corn production among U.S. states, and Illinois corn is used to produce 40% of the ethanol consumed in the United States.[53] The Archer Daniels Midland corporation in Decatur, Illinois is the world's leading producer of ethanol from corn. This article is about the maize plant. ... The Archer Daniels Midland Company (NYSE: ADM), based in Decatur, Illinois, operates more than 270 plants worldwide, where cereal grains and oilseeds are processed into numerous products used in food, beverage, nutraceutical, industrial and animal feed markets worldwide. ... Decatur is the largest city and the county seat of Macon County in the U.S. state of Illinois. ...


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is one of the partners in the Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI), a $500 million biofuels research project funded by petroleum giant BP.[54][55] Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich recently announced a $25 million grant program to fund the construction of five new ethanol and biodiesel plants in Illinois.[56] A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI), formally announced on February 1, 2007, is an organization that will pursue research to develop new sources of energy and reduce the impact of energy consumption on the environment. ... This article is about the energy corporation. ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... This article is about transesterified lipids. ...


Transportation

The sample version of the current Illinois passenger license plate introduced in 2001.
The sample version of the current Illinois passenger license plate introduced in 2001.
See also: List of airports in Illinois, List of Illinois Routes, List of Illinois railroads, and Category:Illinois waterways

Because of its central location and its proximity to the Rust Belt and Grain Belt, Illinois is a national crossroads for rail, auto and truck traffic. Image File history File links CurrentIllinoisPlate. ... Image File history File links CurrentIllinoisPlate. ... A vehicle registration plate is a metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle or trailer for official identification purposes. ... List of airports in Illinois (U.S. state), grouped by type and sorted by location. ... The organized system of Illinois Routes (typically abbreviated as ILL), the state highway system for the U.S. state of Illinois, was created in 1918 with the first State Bond Issue (SBI) Routes, 1 thru 46. ... Current common carriers Amtrak (AMTK) [1] Belt Railway of Chicago (BRC) [2] Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) [3] Canadian National Railway (CN) [4] Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) [5] Central Illinois Railroad (CIRY) Central Indiana and Western Railroad (CEIW) Chicago Rail Link (CRL) [6] Chicago South Shore & South Bend Railroad... Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Belt regions of the United States ...


Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD) is one of the busiest airports in the world, with 62 million domestic passengers annually along with 12 million international passengers.[57] It is a hub for United Airlines and American Airlines, and a major airport expansion project is currently underway. Chicago Midway International Airport (MDW) is the secondary airport serving metro Chicago, with 19 million passengers in 2006. OHare International Airport (IATA: ORD, ICAO: KORD, FAA LID: ORD) is an airport located in Chicago, Illinois, United States, 17 miles (27 km) northwest of the Chicago Loop. ... An airline hub is an airport that an airline uses as a transfer point to get passengers to their intended destination. ... United Airlines is a major airline of the United States. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... For other uses, see Midway Airport (disambiguation). ...


Illinois has an extensive rail network transporting both passengers and freight. Chicago is a national Amtrak hub and in-state passengers are served by Amtrak's Illinois Service featuring the Chicago to Carbondale Illini and Chicago to Quincy Illinois Zephyr and Chicago to St. Louis [lincoln service]. Currently there is trackwork on the Chicago-St. Louis line to bring the maximum speed up to 110 mph (180 km/h) which would reduce the trip time by an hour and a half. Nearly every North American railway meets at Chicago, making it one of the largest and most active rail hubs in the world. Extensive commuter rail is provided in the city proper and immediate northern suburbs by the Chicago Transit Authority's 'L' system. The largest suburban commuter rail system in the United States, operated by Metra, uses existing rail lines to provide direct commuter rail access for hundreds of suburbs to the city and beyond. Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The Illinois Service consists of four train routes operated by Amtrak to provide frequent daily passenger rail service between Chicago and other cities in the state of Illinois (plus additional cities in neighboring Missouri). ... The Illini is a 310-mile (499 km) passenger train operated by Amtrak that runs between Chicago and Carbondale, Illinois. ... The Illinois Zephyr is a 258-mile (415 km) passenger train operated by Amtrak that runs between Chicago and Quincy, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Chicago Transit Authority (disambiguation). ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ... A Metra Train in Ogilvie Transportation Center Metra (officially known as the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is a regional rail system that serves the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States and surrounding cities, many of them Chicago suburbs. ...


Major U.S. Interstate highways crossing the state include: I-24, I-39, I-55, I-57, I-64, I-70, I-72, I-74, I-80, I-88, I-90, and I-94. Illinois carries the distinction of having the most primary (2-digit) Interstates pass through it among the 50 states. In 2005, there were 1,355 traffic deaths on Illinois roadways, the lowest in more than 60 years.[14][15][27][58] Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... INTERSTATE JUNCTIONS JUNCTION EXIT # Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS Prev Next Interstate 39 (abbreviated I-39) is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Interstate 55 (abbreviated I-55) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Interstate 57 (abbreviated I-57) is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Interstate 72 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 74 Interstate 74 (abbreviated I-74) is an interstate highway in the Midwestern and southeastern United States. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 88 (abbreviated I-88) is an interstate highway entirely within the state of Illinois. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 90 Interstate 90 (abbreviated I-90) is the longest interstate highway in the United States at nearly 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). ... Interstate 94 (abbreviated I-94) is the northernmost east-west interstate highway, connecting the Great Lakes and Intermountain regions of the United States. ...


In addition to the states rail lines, the Mississippi River and Illinois River provide major routes for the states agricultural interests. Lake Michigan connects Illinois to all waterways east. For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about the river in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ...


Law and government

See also: Illinois state elections, 2006

Under its constitution, Illinois has three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. Legislative functions are granted to the Illinois General Assembly, composed of the 118-member Illinois House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois Senate. The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois, but four other executive officials are separately elected by the people. The judiciary is composed of the Supreme Court of Illinois and the lower appellate and circuit courts.[13] The Illinois Capital Building in Springfield, Illinois. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Illinois gubernatorial election, 2006. ... The Illinois General Assembly convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... Type Bicameral Speaker Michael Madigan, (D) since 1997 Minority Leader Tom Cross, (R) since 2002 Members 118 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Illinois State Capitol Web site ilga. ... The Illinois Senate convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... The Supreme Court of Illinois is the highest judicial court of the state of Illinois. ... Court of Appeals or (outside the U.S. and in some American states) Court of Appeal is the title of a court which has the power to consider or hear an appeal. ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ...

The dome on the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield is taller than the dome on the United States Capitol.
The dome on the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield is taller than the dome on the United States Capitol.

The Capitol Building in Springfield, Illinois. ... The Capitol Building in Springfield, Illinois. ... The Sixth Illinois Capitol The Illinois State Capitol, located in Springfield, Illinois, is the capitol and seat of government of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ...

Politics

Illinois Government
Governor of Illinois Rod Blagojevich (D)
Lieutenant Governor of Illinois: Pat Quinn (D)
Attorney General of Illinois: Lisa Madigan (D)
Secretary of State of Illinois: Jesse White (D)
Comptroller of Illinois: Daniel Hynes (D)
Treasurer of Illinois: Alexi Giannoulias (D)
Senior United States Senator: Richard J. Durbin (D)
Junior United States Senator: Barack Obama (D)

Historically, Illinois was a major battleground state between the Republican Party and the Democratic Party. In recent elections, it has gradually shifted more Democratic at the national and state level and has become the most Democratic state in the Midwest. Democratic dominance in Illinois is due in part to the control of Chicago. In addition, Democrats have made inroads in the traditionally Republican "collar counties" (i.e., the suburbs surrounding Chicago's Cook County, Illinois), which are becoming increasingly diverse. In downstate Illinois, Republicans usually prevail in rural northern and central Illinois, and Democrats usually win in southern Illinois and in the Quad Cities and East St. Louis metropolitan areas. Illinois voted for Democratic presidential candidates in the last four elections. John Kerry easily won the state's 21 electoral votes in 2004 by a margin of 11 percentage points with 54.8% of the vote despite winning outright in only 15 of 102 counties. The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Lieutenant Governor of Illinois is the secondary chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the lieutenant governor has specific jurisdiction. ... Pat Quinn (born 1948), is a United States politician from the state of Illinois. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Illinois Attorney General is the highest legal officer of the state of Illinois in the United States. ... Lisa Madigan (born July 30, 1966 in Chicago) is the current and 41st Attorney General of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Secretary of State of Illinois is the keeper of the official records, laws, and Great Seal of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Jesse White (born June 23, 1934) is a Democratic American politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Daniel W. Hynes (born July 20, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois) is currently the Comptroller of the State of Illinois. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Alexi Giannoulias (born 03/17/1976) is the Democratic Illinois State Treasurer. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... “Barack” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Cook County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... The I-74 Bridge, connecting Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline, Illinois is located near the geographic center of the Quad Cities. ... East St. ...


Politics in the state, particularly Chicago machine politics, have been famous for highly visible corruption cases, as well as for crusading reformers such as governors Adlai Stevenson (D) and James R. Thompson (R). In 2006, former Governor George Ryan (R) was convicted of racketeering and bribery. In the late 20th century Congressman Dan Rostenkowski (Dem) was imprisoned for mail fraud; former governor and federal judge Otto Kerner, Jr. (D) was imprisoned for bribery; and State Auditor of Public Accounts (Comptroller) Orville Hodge (R) was imprisoned for embezzlement. In 1912 William Lorimer, the GOP boss of Chicago, was expelled from the U.S. Senate for bribery, and in 1921 Governor Len Small (R) was found to have defrauded the state of a million dollars.[59][27][15] The Chicago Machine is a lacrosse team based in Bridgeview, Illinois. ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... George Ryan George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ... Daniel David Dan Rostenkowski served in the U.S. Congress as a U.S. Representative for Illinois from 1959 to 1995. ... Otto Kerner, Jr. ... Orville Enoch Hodge (born October 1, 1904, Anderson, Indiana - died 29 December 1986, Edwardsville, Madison Co. ...


Illinois has the unique distinction of having popularly elected two of the five African Americans who have served in the U.S. Senate: Carol Moseley-Braun and Barack Obama.[60] African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Carol Moseley Braun (born August 16, American politician and lawyer, was the first (and to date only) black woman elected to the United States Senate (representing Illinois). ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


The first Governor was Shadrach Bond, who served from 1818 to 1822. Shadrach Bond Shadrick Bonbs Shadrach Bond (November 24, 1773–April 12, 1832) was Illinoiss first governor, and for six years before that, the first representative of the area to become Illinois. ...


Two presidents have claimed Illinois as their political base, former Representative of Illinois' 7th congressional district Abraham Lincoln (born in Kentucky) and General Ulysses S. Grant (born in Ohio). President Ronald Reagan was born in Tampico, Illinois, but ran from his political home state of California, where he served as Governor. Former Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson was the Democratic nominee for president in 1952 and 1956. Current Illinois Senator Barack Obama (born in Honolulu, Hawaii) received enough delegates to clinch the Presidential nomination of the Democratic Party in the 2008 United States Presidential election, and if successful in the general election, would be the third president from Illinois. His main opponent for the nomination, New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (born in Chicago and raised in Park Ridge, Illinois) would have been the second president born in Illinois, although she is running from New York.
Illinoiss Seventh First Congressional District since 2003. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Reagan redirects here. ... Tampico is a village located in Whiteside County, Illinois. ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... “Barack” redirects here. ... For the city and county of Honolulu, see City & County of Honolulu. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States Presidential election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ... This article is about the state. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... The City of Park Ridge The city of Park Ridge is an affluent suburb of Chicago in Cook County in the United States. ...


Largest cities

See also: List of cities in Illinois and List of towns and villages in Illinois

Chicago is the largest city in the state and the third most populous city in the United States. The US Bureau of the Census currently lists seven other cities with populations of over 100,000 within Illinois. Based upon the Bureau's official 2006 scientific estimates,[61] they are: Aurora, a Chicago outlier which at 170,617 has recently (2006) eclipsed Rockford for the title of "Second City" of Illinois. However, at 155,138, Rockford is not only the number three city, but also remains the largest city in the state not located within the Chicago metropolitan area. Naperville, another suburb located west of Chicago, is the fourth largest city in the state, with a population of 142,901. Joliet, a city southwest of Chicago, is fifth with 142,702. Springfield, the state capital of Illinois, comes in sixth with 116,482. Peoria, which decades ago was the second largest city in the state, comes in seventh with 113,107. The final city in the 100,000 club is Elgin, an outlying northwest suburb of Chicago with a 2006 population of 101,903. Other major urban areas include the Illinois portion of the Greater St. Louis area (often called the Metro-East area) which has a population of over 600,000 people, the Illinois portion the Quad Cities area which has a population of 215,000, the Champaign-Urbana area which has a combined population of 210,000, and Bloomington-Normal with a combined population of over 125,000. List of cities in Illinois, arranged in alphabetical order. ... List of towns and villages in Illinois, arranged in alphabetical order. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The Paramount Theatre under renovation, downtown Aurora. ... See also exclaves and Polynesian outliers. ... , Nickname: The Forest City Country State County Township Elevation 715 ft (218 m) Coordinates , Area 56. ... Naperville is a city in DuPage and Will counties in Illinois in the United States, voted the second best place to live in the United States by Money Magazine in 2006. ... Incorporated City in 1834. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... : Will it Play in Peoria? United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Incorporated City in 1854. ... Greater St. ... Metro-East is a region in Illinois that comprises the eastern suburbs St. ... The I-74 Bridge, connecting Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline, Illinois is located near the geographic center of the Quad Cities. ... The Champaign-Urbana Metropolitan Area, also known as Chambana, is a region in east central Illinois. ... This refers to the adjoined cities of Bloomington, Illinois and Normal, Illinois located in the McLean County of Central Illinois. ...

Chicago's skyline
Chicago's skyline

Download high resolution version (5510x809, 4311 KB) A picture of the Chicago skyline at sunset. ... Download high resolution version (5510x809, 4311 KB) A picture of the Chicago skyline at sunset. ...

Education

Rockefeller Chapel, constructed in 1928, is the tallest structure on the University of Chicago campus.
Rockefeller Chapel, constructed in 1928, is the tallest structure on the University of Chicago campus.

Image File history File links Rockefeller_Chapel. ... Image File history File links Rockefeller_Chapel. ... The carillon tower of the Rockefeller Chapel. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ...

Illinois State Board of Education

The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with the Illinois School Report Card. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies. The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state of Illinois. ... // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... The Illinois School Report Card is a measurement of school performance created by the Illinois State Board of Education. ...


Primary and secondary schools

See also: List of school districts in Illinois and List of high schools in Illinois

Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. District territories are often complex in structure. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district. // List of school districts in Illinois Central Community Unit School District 3 - District web site Community Unit School District 4 - District web site Liberty Community Unit School District 2 - District web site Payson Community Unit School District 1 - District web site Quincy School District 172 - District web site Cairo Unit... This is a list of high schools in the state of Illinois. ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... Middle school and junior high school cover a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education and serve as a bridge between them. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Colleges and universities

See also: List of colleges and universities in Illinois

The following is a list of colleges and universities in Illinois. ...

Major universities

Using the criterion established by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, there are nine "National Universities" in the state. Four of these rank among the top 100 National Universities in United States, as determined by the prestigious US News and World Report rankings: the University of Chicago (9), Northwestern University (14), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (38), and the Illinois Institute of Technology (96) [3]. The other five major schools are: (alphabetically) DePaul University, Illinois State University, Loyola University Chicago, Northern Illinois University, and Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Carnagie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered in 1906 by an Act of Congress. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ... DePaul University[1] is a private institution of higher education and research in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Founded by the Vincentians in 1898, the university takes its name from the 17th century French priest who valued philanthropy, Saint Vincent de Paul. ... Illinois State University is a public university in Normal, Illinois and is the oldest public institution of higher education in the state. ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... Northern Illinois University is a public university located in DeKalb, Illinois. ... Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC but usually just referred to as SIU) is located in Carbondale, Illinois. ...


Other post-secondary schools

Besides the "National Universities", Illinois has several other universities, both public and private. There are also literally dozens of small liberal arts colleges across the state. Additionally, Illinois supports 49 public community colleges in the Illinois Community College System. The following is a list of colleges and universities in Illinois. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... A community college is a type of educational institution. ... The Illinois community college system consists of 40 public community college districts composed of 49 community colleges. ...


Sports

Soldier Field following renovation.
Soldier Field following renovation.
See also: List of professional sports teams in Illinois

Because of its large population, Chicago is the focus of most professional sports in Illinois though outside of the Chicago area professional teams in St. Louis and Indianapolis are also supported. Chicago is the home to 15 different professional sports teams. Presented here is a photo of Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, and the home of the Chicago Bears. ... Presented here is a photo of Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, and the home of the Chicago Bears. ... The following is a List of professional sports teams in Illinois. ...


The Chicago Cubs of the National League play in the second-oldest major league stadium (Wrigley Field) and are famous for not winning the World Series since 1908. The Chicago White Sox of the American League won the World Series championship in 2005, their first since 1917. The Chicago Bears football team has won 9 total NFL Championships, the last occurring in Super Bowl XX. Coincidentally, the city's Arena Football League team, the Chicago Rush, won ArenaBowl XX. The Chicago Bulls of the NBA are one of the most recognized basketball teams in the world, thanks to the heroics of a player often cited as the best ever, Michael Jordan, who led the team to six NBA championships in eight seasons in the 1990s. The Chicago Blackhawks of the NHL began playing in 1926 as a member of the Original Six and have won three Stanley Cups. The Chicago Fire soccer club are members of MLS and are one of the league's most successful and best-supported since its founding in 1997, winning one league and four US Open Cups in that timespan. The Chicago Wolves are an AHL minor league team that is also very popular and has been a winning team since it's first season. The city was formerly home to other teams, such as the Chicago Rockers of the CBA, Chicago Skyliners of the IBL, the Chicago Bruisers of Arena Football and the Chicago Blitz of the USFL. Before the Fire, the Chicago Sting of Major League Soccer and the Chicago Power of the MISL both spent time as the state's premiere soccer team. The city is not the only place where sports played professionally. The Rockford Lightning is one of the oldest CBA teams in the league, and the Peoria Chiefs and Kane County Cougars are minor league baseball teams affiliated with MLB. The Schaumburg Flyers are a prominent independent league baseball team. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... For the former ballpark in Los Angeles, see Wrigley Field (Los Angeles). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) (Chicago) White Stockings (1901-1903 *From 1900 to 1903, the official name did not contain the city name of Chicago... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... This is a list of National Football League champions prior to the 1970 AFL-NFL Merger, that is, all the franchises that have won the championship of the National Football League. ... Date January 26, 1986 Stadium Louisiana Superdome City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Richard Dent, Defensive end Favorite Bears by 10 National anthem Wynton Marsalis Coin toss Bart Starr representing previous Super Bowl MVPs Referee Red Cashion Halftime show Up with People presents Beat of the Future Attendance 73,818 TV... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... Conference American Division Central Year founded 2001 Home arena Allstate Arena City, State Rosemont, Illinois Head Coach Mike Hohensee ArenaBowl championships 1: 2006 Conference titles 1: 2006 Division titles 3: 2002, 2004, 2007 Wild Card berths 4: 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006 The Chicago Rush are a team in the Arena... Date June 11, 2006 Arena Thomas & Mack Center City Las Vegas, Nevada Attendance 13,476 Offensive Player of the Game Matt DOrazio, QB, Chicago Defensive Player of the Game Dennison Robinson, WR/DB, Chicago Ironman of the Game Bob McMillen, FB/LB, Chicago Winning Coach Mike Hohensee Losing Coach... This article is about the professional basketball team. ... NBA redirects here. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Original Six is a well-known term for the six teams which comprised the National Hockey League (NHL) for the 25 seasons between the 1942-43 NHL season and the 1967 NHL Expansion. ... Year founded 1997 League Major League Soccer Nickname La Maquina Roja, Men in Red, CF97 Stadium Toyota Park Bridgeview, IL Coach Juan Carlos Osorio[1] Owner Andell Holdings First Game Miami Fusion 0–2 Chicago Fire (Lockhart Stadium; March 21, 1998) Largest Win Kansas City Wizards 0–7 Chicago Fire... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a North America professional soccer league. ... The Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup is an American soccer competition open to all United States Soccer Federation(USSF) affiliated teams, from amateur adult club teams all the way up to the top professional clubs of Major League Soccer. ... The Chicago Wolves are a professional hockey team playing in the American Hockey League. ... AHL might be an acronym or abbreviation for: American Hockey League acylated homoserine lactones This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Chicago Bruisers were a charter member of the Arena Football League, playing in the four-team demonstration season of 1987. ... Categories: Defunct American football teams | Chicago sports | American football stubs ... The United States Football League was a professional American football league that played three seasons between 1983 and 1985, in the process presenting the rival National Football League with its greatest competitor since the 1960s version of the American Football League. ... The Chicago Sting (1975-1988) were a United States professional soccer team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a North America professional soccer league. ... The Chicago Power were an indoor soccer club based in Chicago, Illinois that competed in the National Professional Soccer League. ... Misl refers to a fighting clan. ... The Rockford Lightning are a basketball team that played in the Continental Basketball Association. ... The abbreviation CBA can refer to: California Bluegrass Association Canadian Bankers Association Canadian Bar Association (CBA) Canadian Booksellers Association (CBA) CBA (AM), the CBC Radio One station in Moncton, New Brunswick CBA-FM, the CBC Radio Two station in Moncton Central Bank of Armenia Christian Booksellers Association Christian Brothers Academy... The Peoria Chiefs are a Class A minor league baseball team, affiliated with the Chicago Cubs, from Peoria, Illinois. ... Class-Level Single-A Minor League affiliations Midwest League Western Division Major League affiliations Oakland Athletics (2003-Present) Florida Marlins (1993-2002) Baltimore Orioles (1991-1992) Name Kane County Cougars Ballpark Philip B. Elfstrom Stadium Minor League titles League titles 2001 Division titles 2001, 2004 Owner(s)/Operated by: Manager... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... League affiliations Northern League Name Schaumburg Flyers (1999-present) Thunder Bay Whiskey Jacks (1993-1998) Team Colors navy blue, orange, khaki Ballpark Alexian Field Championships League titles: Division titles: 3 (1999, 2004, 2006)  Owner(s)/Operated By: Richard Ehrenreich John E. Hughes Mike Conley General Manager: Manager: Steve Maddock Media...


See also

  • List of Illinois-related topics
Illinois Portal

References

  1. ^ 5 ILCS 460/20 (from Ch. 1, par. 2901‑20) - Sec. 20. "Official language. The official language of the State of Illinois is English."
  2. ^ [1] U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Demographic Profile Highlights
  3. ^ US Census Bureau, median household income by state 2004. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  4. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  5. ^ Stephen Ohlemacher. "Analysis ranks Illinois most average state", Associated Press, May 17, 2007. 
  6. ^ Stephen Ohlemacher. "Analysis ranks Illinois most average state", Associated Press, May 17, 2007. 
  7. ^ Biles (2005) ch 1
  8. ^ "Chicago's Front Door: Chicago Harbor." A digital exhibit published online by the Chicago Public Library. [2] Accessed October 20, 2007.
  9. ^ Comments by Michael McCafferty on "Readers' Feedback (page 4)". The KryssTal. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  10. ^ Costa, David J. 2000. "Miami-Illinois Tribe Names". In the Papers of the 31st Algonquian Conference, University of Manitoba Press, pp. 146-7
  11. ^ Illinois. Dictionary.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  12. ^ Illinois Symbols. State of Illinois. Retrieved on 2006-04-20.
  13. ^ a b Wikisource. Illinois Constitution of 1818.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j (1978) in Nelson, Ronald E. (ed.): Illinois: Land and Life in the Prairie State. ISBN 0-8403-1831-6. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Horsley, A. Doyne (1986). Illinois: A Geography. ISBN 0-86531-522-1. 
  16. ^ Illinois State Climatologist Office. Climate Maps for Illinois. Accessed April 22, 2006.
  17. ^ Midwestern Regional Climate Center (MRCC). Illinois Extreme Temperature list. Accessed April 22, 2006.
  18. ^ "Annual average number of tornadoes, 1953-2004", NOAA National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on October 24, 2006.
  19. ^ PAH Webmaster (2005-11-02). NWS Paducah, KY: NOAA/NWS 1925 Tri-State Tornado Web Site -- General Information. Retrieved on 2006-11-16.
  20. ^ "Average Weather for Cairo, IL",weather.com
  21. ^ "Chicago Weather", ustravelweather.com
  22. ^ "Moline Weather", ustravelweather.com
  23. ^ "Peoria Weather", ustravelweather.com
  24. ^ "Rockford Weather", ustravelweather.com
  25. ^ "Springfield Weather", ustravelweather.com
  26. ^ Frederick E. Hoxie, Encyclopedia of North American Indians (1996) 266-7, 506
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h Biles, Roger (2005). Illinois: A History of the Land and its People. ISBN 0-87580-349-0. 
  28. ^ Duff, Judge Andrew D. Egypt. Republished, Springhouse Magazine. Accessed May 1, 2006.
  29. ^ James Pickett Jones, Black Jack: John A. Logan and Southern Illinois in the Civil War Era 1967 ISBN 0-8093-2002-9
  30. ^ Illinois in the Civil War. Illinois Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery Units. Accessed November 26, 2006.
  31. ^ United States Census BureauPopulation Estimates Program
  32. ^ United States Census Bureau. 2004 American Community Survey.
  33. ^ American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. State Centers of Population. Accessed April 20, 2006.
  34. ^ American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS). CUNY Key Findings. 2001.
  35. ^ United States Census Bureau. Illinois Quick Facts, 2004. Accessed August 28, 2006.
  36. ^ "Most Spoken Languages In Illinois", Modern Language Association.
  37. ^ See Statemaster. Retrieved 29 July 2007.
  38. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis. Gross State Products. October 26, 2005.
  39. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis. State Per Capita Personal Income. March 28, 2006.
  40. ^ Illinois Department of Revenue. Individual Income Tax. Accessed May 27, 2006.
  41. ^ Illinois Department of Revenue. Illinois Sales Tax Reference Manual (PDF). p133. January 1, 2006.
  42. ^ "State Soy Crop Statistics", Soy Stats, The American Soybean Association.
  43. ^ "Ethanol Fact Sheet", Illinois Corn Growers Association.
  44. ^ "Manufacturing in Illinois", Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.
  45. ^ a b "Illinois in the Global Energy Marketplace", Robert Finley, 2001. Illinois State Geological Survey publication.
  46. ^ Illinois State Geological Survey. Coal in Illinois. Accessed April 20, 2006.
  47. ^ United States Department of Energy. Petroleum Profile: Illinois. Accessed April 4, 2006.
  48. ^ a b United States Department of Energy. Illinois Nuclear Industry. Accessed April 4, 2006.
  49. ^ "Illinois Wind." Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs, Western Illinois University Illinoiswind.com
  50. ^ "Wind Powering America: Illinois Wind Maps", 2001. United States Department of Energy.
  51. ^ "Illinois Wind Energy Development", Wind Project Data Base, American Wind Energy Association.
  52. ^ "Wind Power on the Illinois Horizon", Rob Kanter, September 14, 2006. University of Illinois Environmental Council.
  53. ^ "Ethanol Fact Sheet", Illinois Corn Growers Association.
  54. ^ "BP Pledges $500 Million for Energy Biosciences Institute and Plans New Business to Exploit Research", BP.com, June 14, 2006.
  55. ^ "Gov. Blagojevich joins Gov. Schwarzenegger, top BP executives to celebrate launch of $500 million biosciences energy research partnership with University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, UC-Berkeley". Press release, Illinois.gov. February 1, 2007.
  56. ^ "Illinois invests $25 million in five new biofuels facilities", Biodiesel Magazine, October 2006.
  57. ^ "Airport Statistics", Fly Chicago.com.
  58. ^ Governor of Illinois. Press release. Accessed April 20, 2006.
  59. ^ James L. Merriner, Grafters and Goo Goos: Corruption and Reform in Chicago, 1833-2003 (2004)
  60. ^ U.S. Senate: Art & History Home
  61. ^ American Fact Finder, United States Census Bureau.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Public Library consists of 79 branches throughout the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. // In the aftermath of the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, Londoner A.H. Burgess, with the aid of Thomas Hughes drew up what would be called the English Book Donation, which proposed that England should provide... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dictionary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded four million Americans. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Fifth Edition The Modern Language Association of America (MLA) is the principal professional association in the United States for scholars of literature and literary criticism. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Finley (1772 – October 3, 1817) was briefly the president of the University of Georgia. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For another university which uses the abbreviation WIU, see Webber International University Western Illinois University is a public university founded in 1899 as Western Illinois State Normal School. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

Bibliography

  • Biles, Roger. Illinois: A History of the Land and Its People (2005)
  • Bridges, Roger D. and Davis, Rodney O., Illinois : Its History and Legacy (1984) (ISBN 0933150865)
  • Cole, Arthur Charles. The Era of the Civil War, 1848-1870 (1919). ISBN 0-8369-5646-X. narrative history
  • Costa, David J. Illinois. (2007). Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas Newsletter XXV: 4, 9-12.
  • Davis, James E. Frontier Illinois (1998). ISBN 0-253-33423-3. analytic history
  • Gove, Samuel K. and James D. Nowlan. Illinois Politics & Government: The Expanding Metropolitan Frontier (1996). ISBN 0-8032-7014-3. Government text with guide to further sources.
  • Grossman, James R., Ann Durkin Keating, and Janice L. Reiff, eds. The Encyclopedia of Chicago (2004). ISBN 0-226-31015-9. online version; major scholarly guide to the metro area's history, geography, and culture
  • Hallwas, John E. ed., Illinois Literature: The Nineteenth Century (1986). OCLC 14228886.
  • Howard, Robert P. Illinois: A History of the Prairie State (1972). ISBN 0-8028-7025-2. textbook
  • Jensen, Richard. Illinois: A History (2001). ISBN 0-252-07021-6. interpretation using a traditional-modern-postmodern model.
  • Keiser, John H. Building for the Centuries: Illinois 1865-1898 (1977). ISBN 0-252-00617-8, narrative history
  • Meyer, Douglas K. Making the Heartland Quilt: A Geographical History of Settlement and Migration in Early-Nineteenth-Century Illinois (2000). ISBN 0-8093-2289-7.
  • Kilduff, Pygman. Illinois: History Government Geography (1962) school text
  • Kleppner, Paul. Political Atlas of Illinois (1988). ISBN 0-87580-136-6. Maps for 1980s.
  • Peck, J. M. A Gazetteer of Illinois (1837). ISBN 1-55613-782-6.
  • Sutton, Robert P. ed. The Prairie State: A Documentary History of Illinois (1977). ISBN 0-8028-1651-7. 2 vol of primary sources
  • Walton, C. Clyde. ed. An Illinois Reader (1970), primary sources
  • Works Progress Administration. Illinois: A Descriptive and Historical Guide (1939). ISBN 0-394-72195-0. A famous survey covering every town and city and much more.

WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ...

External links

Find more about Illinois on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • State of Illinois Web Site
  • Illinois State Databases - Annotated list of searchable databases produced by Illinois state agencies and compiled by the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association.
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Illinois
  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Illinois State Facts
  • Biographies of Illinois Governors 1818 to 1885
  • 1837 Gazetteer of Illinois


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Coordinates: 40° N 89° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Illinois General Assembly - Illinois Compiled Statutes (178 words)
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process.
Disclaimer: This site contains provisions of the Illinois Compiled Statutes from databases that were created for the use of the members and staff of the Illinois General Assembly.
The provisions have NOT been edited for publication, and are NOT in any sense the "official" text of the Illinois Compiled Statutes as enacted into law.
Welcome to IEMA (1024 words)
Illinois is one of the first states to open a terrorism intelligence fusion center.
Illinois now has ten (10) Illinois Transportable Emergency Communications Systems (ITECS) around the state that can be taken to a disaster scene anywhere in the state and used to patch together the different radio frequencies used by various response agencies.
Illinois was the first state to conduct a large-scale pandemic flu exercise in May 2006.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m