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Encyclopedia > Iceni
History of the British Isles

The History of the British Isles, until the last few hundred years, was one of struggle and competition between the separate nation-states that occupied various parts of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 590 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Stonehenge ...

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By nation Ancient Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... In the British Isles, the Iron Age lasted from about the 7th century BC until the Roman conquest and until the 5th century in non-Romanised parts. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Sub-Roman Britain is a term derived from an archaeologists label for the material culture of Britain in Late Antiquity. ... The British Isles in the year 802 Medieval Britain is a term used to suggest that there is a unity to the history of Great Britain from the 5th century withdrawal of Roman forces from the province of Britannia and the Germanic invasions, until the 16th century Reformations in the... Early Modern Britain is a term used to define the period in the history of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • History of England
  • History of Northern Ireland
  • History of Ireland
  • History of Scotland
  • History of Wales

By topic To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The area now known as Northern Ireland has had a diverse history. ... The first known human settlement in Ireland began around 8000 BC, when hunter-gatherers arrived from Britain and continental Europe, possibly via a land bridge. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

The Iceni or Eceni were a Brythonic tribe who inhabited an area of Britain corresponding roughly to the modern-day county of Norfolk between the 1st century BC and 1st century AD. The Cenimagni, who surrendered to Julius Caesar during his second expedition to Britain in 54 BC, may have been a branch of the Iceni.[1] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... British military history is a long and varied topic, extending from the prehistoric and ancient historic period, through the Roman invasions of Julius Cæsar and Claudius and subsequent Roman occupation; warfare in the Mediaeval period, including the invasions of the Saxons and the Vikings in the Early Middle Ages... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Brython and Brythonic are terms which refer to indigenous, pre-Roman, Celtic speaking inhabitants of most of the island of Great Britain, and their cultures and languages, the Brythonic languages. ... http://www. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Gāius Jūlius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Archaeological evidence of the Iceni includes torcs - heavy rings of gold, silver or electrum worn around the neck and shoulders. Archaeology, archeology, or archology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech/discourse) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... A torc, also spelled torq or torque (from Latin torqueo, to twist, because of the twisted shape of the collar) is a rigid circular necklace that is open-ended at the front. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... Electrum coin of the Byzantine Emperor Alexius I Comnenus. ... A human neck. ... The human upper arm Grays Fig. ...


The Iceni began producing coins ca. 10 BC. Their coins were a distinctive adaptation of the Gallo-Belgic "face/horse" design, and in some early issues, most numerous near Norwich, the horse was replaced with a boar. Some coins are inscribed ECENI, making them the only coin-producing group to use their tribal name on coins. The earliest personal name to appear on coins is Antedios (ca. 10 BC), and other abbreviated names like AESU and SAEMU follow.[2] Antedios was an ancient king of the Iceni, a Brythonic Tribe who inhabited the present day county of Norfolk in Britain from approximately the 1st Century BCE until the 1st Century CE. Antedios came to power in 25 CE, succeeding the Icenian ruler Can. ...


Sir Thomas Browne the first British archaeological writer, noted in Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial (1658) of the Roman occupation, Boudica and Iceni coins - Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 - October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial, or a Discourse of the Sepulchral Urns lately found in Norfolk, is a work published in 1658 by Sir Thomas Browne. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by... Statue of Boudica near Westminster Pier, with her two daughters upon a chariot Boudica (also Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ...


That Britain was notably populous is undeniable, from that expression of Caesar. That the Romans themselves were early in no small Numbers, Seventy Thousand with their associates slain by Bouadicea, affords a sure account... And no small number of silver peeces near Norwich; with a rude head upon the obverse, an ill-formed horse on the reverse, with the Inscriptions Ic. Duro.T. whether implying Iceni, Dutotriges, Tascia, or Trinobantes, we leave to higher conjecture. The British Coyns afford conjecture of early habitation in these parts, though the City of Norwich arose from the ruins of Venta, and though perhaps not without some habitation before, was enlarged, built, and nominated by the Saxons. Gāius Jūlius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Statue of Boudica near Westminster Pier, with her two daughters upon a chariot Boudica (also Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... Shown within Norfolk Geography Status: City (1195) Government Region: East of England Administrative County: Norfolk Area: - Total Ranked 322nd 39. ... The Trinovantes or Trinobantes were one of the Celtic tribes that lived in pre-Roman Britain. ... Venta is a river in north-western Lithuania and western Latvia. ... Map showing the Saxons homeland in traditional region bounded by the three rivers: Weser, Eider, and Elbe Src: Freemans Historical Geographys. The Saxons or Saxon people are (nowadays) part of the German people with its main areas of settlements in the German States of Schleswig-Holstein, Lower Saxony, Saxony...


The Icknield Way, an ancient trackway linking East Anglia to the Chilterns may be named after the Iceni. The Icknield Way is one of the oldest roads in Britain, being one of the few long-distance trackways to have existed before the Romans occupied the country. ... The Concise Oxford Dictionary gives the definition of trackway as a path formed by the repeated treading of people or animals, and it is with this idea in mind that this article has been written. ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment that stretches in a south-west to north-east diagonal from Goring-On-Thames to Luton, but is most prominent in Buckinghamshire. ...

Contents

The Roman Invasion

Tacitus records that the Iceni were not conquered in the Claudian invasion of AD 43, but had come to a voluntary alliance with the Romans. However they rose against them in 47 after the governor, Publius Ostorius Scapula, threatened to disarm them. They were defeated by Ostorius in a fierce battle at a fortified place, but were allowed to retain their independence.[3] The site of the battle may have been Stonea Camp in Cambridgeshire. Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... Publius Ostorius Scapula (died 52) was a Roman statesman and general. ... Stonea Camp is an Iron Age hill fort located near March in Cambridgeshire. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ...


A second, more serious, uprising took place in 61. Prasutagus, the wealthy, pro-Roman Icenian king, had died. It was common practice for a Roman client king to leave his kingdom to Rome on his death, but Prasutagus had attempted to preserve his line by bequeathing his kingdom jointly to the Emperor and his own daughters. The Romans ignored this, and the procurator Catus Decianus seized his entire estate. Prasutagus's widow, Boudica, was flogged and her daughters raped. At the same time, Roman financiers called in their loans. While the governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, was campaigning in Wales, Boudica led the Iceni and the neighbouring Trinovantes in a large-scale revolt, destroying and looting Camulodunum (Colchester), Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St Albans) before finally being defeated by Suetonius Paulinus and his legions. Although the Britons outnumbered the Romans greatly, they lacked that superior training and tactics that won the Romans a decisive victory. [4]The battle took place at an unknown location, probably in the West Midlands somewhere along Watling Street. [5] Today, a large statue of Boudica wielding a sword and charging upon a chariot can be seen in London on the north bank of the Thames by Westminster Bridge. Prasutagus was king of a British Celtic tribe called the Iceni, who inhabited roughly what is now Norfolk, in the 1st century AD. His wife was Boudicca. ... The Roman client kingdoms in Britain were native tribes who chose to align themselves with the Roman Empire either because they saw it as the best option for self preservation or for protection from other hostile tribes. ... A procurator is the incumbent of any of several current and historical political or legal offices. ... Catus Decianus was the procurator of Roman Britain in 61 AD. Tacitus blames his rapacity in part for provoking the rebellion of Boudicca. ... Statue of Boudica near Westminster Pier, with her two daughters upon a chariot Boudica (also Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, also spelled Paullinus, (flourished 1st century CE) was a Roman general. ... The Trinovantes or Trinobantes were one of the Celtic tribes that dwelt in pre-Roman Britain. ... This article is about revolution in the sense of a drastic change. ... This article is about the town in England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Londinium may refer to: An ancient Roman name for London (see History of London) Londinium (movie) A song by Catatonia A fictional planet in the TV show Firefly, (see moons and planets in Firefly) Londinivm, a free MMORPG. Londinium (album), an album by the band Archive This is a disambiguation... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... St Albans (thus spelt, no apostrophe or dot) is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35. ... The West Midlands is a geographical term describing the western half of central England, known as the Midlands. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to a British ancient trackway which was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hittite chariot (drawing of an Egyptian relief) Approximate historical map of the spread of the chariot, 2000 –500 BC. A chariot is a two-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Westminster Bridge and the Palace of Westminster, with a glimpse of Westminster Abbey behind the tower of Big Ben. ...


The Iceni are recorded as a civitas of Roman Britain in Ptolemy's Geography[6], which names Venta Icenorum as a town of theirs. Venta, which is also mentioned in the Ravenna Cosmography,[7] and the Antonine Itinerary,[8] was a settlement near the village of Caister Saint Edmunds, some 5 miles south of present-day Norwich, and a mile or two from the Bronze Age Henge at Arminghall. In the history of the Roman empire, civitas (pl. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; c. ... Venta Icenorum was the civitas[1] capital of the powerful and independent Iceni tribe, who inhabited the flatlands and marshes of Norfolk and earned immortality for their revolt against Roman rule under their queen Boudica (or Boadicea) in the winter of 61 CE. The Iceni had close ties with their... Ravenna is a city and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... The Antonine Itinerary is a Latin document that can be described as the Road Map of Roman Britain. ... A village is a human residential settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... Shown within Norfolk Geography Status: City (1195) Government Region: East of England Administrative County: Norfolk Area: - Total Ranked 322nd 39. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... A henge is a roughly circular or oval-shaped flat area over 20m in diameter which is enclosed and delimited by a boundary earthwork that usually comprises a ditch with an external bank. ... Arminghall is a village in the English county of Norfolk, around three miles south east of Norwich. ...


References

  1. ^ Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 5.21
  2. ^ Graham Webster (1978), Boudica: the British Revolt Against Rome AD 60, pp. 46-48
  3. ^ Tacitus, Annals 12.31
  4. ^ Cambridge Latin Course Textbook, Unit 2
  5. ^ Agricola 14-17; Annals 14:29-39; Dio Cassius, Roman History 62:1-12
  6. ^ Ptolemy, Geography 2.2
  7. ^ Ravenna Cosmography (British section)
  8. ^ Antonine Itinerary (British section)

Gāius Jūlius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Commentarii de Bello Gallico (literally Commentaries on the Gallic Wars in Latin) is an account written by Julius Caesar about his nine years of war in Gaul. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... The Annals, or, in Latin, Annales, is a history book by Tacitus covering the reign of the 4 Roman Emperors succeeding to Caesar Augustus. ... The Agricola (full Latin title: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c. ... The Annals, or, in Latin, Annales, is a history book by Tacitus covering the reign of the 4 Roman Emperors succeeding to Caesar Augustus. ... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (c. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; c. ...

Bibliography

  • Tom Williamson (1993), The Origins of Norfolk, Manchester University Press

External links

  • Iceni at Roman-Britain.org
  • Iceni at Romans in Britain

  Results from FactBites:
 
Iceni - definition of Iceni in Encyclopedia (494 words)
The Iceni were a Celtic British tribe who inhabited roughly modern-day Norfolk circa 1st century BC to 1st century AD.
The territory of the Iceni approximated to the borders of modern-day Norfolk.
The Iceni are mentioned in Tacitus's Annals which were written in AD 118 but describing the events of AD Tacitus records how in 47 the Iceni revolted against Roman occupation and once again in 60, this time led by Boudicca.
Iceni - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (524 words)
The Iceni or Eceni were a Brythonic tribe who inhabited an area of Britain corresponding roughly to the modern-day county of Norfolk between the 1st century BCE and 1st century CE.
The Iceni are mentioned in Tacitus's Annals, which were written c.
CE 118 but describing the events of CE Tacitus records how in 47 the Iceni revolted against Roman occupation and once again in 60, this time led by Boudica.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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