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Encyclopedia > Ice rink
Rockefeller Center ice rink
Rockefeller Center ice rink
Outdoor ice rink in Ottawa.
Outdoor ice rink in Ottawa.
A big ice rink in Kharkov. Viev outside.
A big ice rink in Kharkov. Viev outside.

An ice rink is a frozen body of water where people can ice skate or play winter sports. Some of its uses include playing ice hockey, figure skating exhibitions and contests, and ice shows. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 885 KB) Photographer: Bruin from Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. Title: Picturs 050 Description: Rockefeller Center Ice Skating Rink. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 885 KB) Photographer: Bruin from Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. Title: Picturs 050 Description: Rockefeller Center Ice Skating Rink. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Kharkov (rus: Ха́рьков) or Kharkiv (ukr: Ха́рків) is the second largest city in Ukraine, a center of Kharkivska oblast. It is situated in the northeast of the country and has a population of two million. ... This article is about water ice. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Ice skates are boots with blades attached to the bottom, used to propel oneself across a sheet of ice. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... This article is about water ice. ...


Many ice rinks consist of, or are found on, open bodies of water such as lakes, ponds, canals, and sometimes rivers; these can only be used in the winter in climates where the surface would freeze thickly enough to support human weight. This article is about water ice. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ...


Artificial rinks can also be made in cold climates by enclosing a level area of ground, filling it with water, and letting it freeze. Snow may even be packed to use as the containment material. For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...


In any climate, an arena ice surface can be installed in a properly built space. This consists of a bed of sand, or occasionally a slab of concrete, through (or on top of) which pipes run. The pipes carry a chilled fluid (usually either a salt brine or water with antifreeze) which can lower the temperature of the slab so that water placed atop it will freeze. Such rinks were developed in the late nineteenth century, the first being the Glaciarium in London.[citation needed] This article is about water ice. ... This article is about the construction material. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... For other uses, see Antifreeze (disambiguation). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... The Glaciarium was the worlds first mechanically frozen ice rink. ...


Modern rinks have a specific procedure for preparing the surface:

  • With the pipes cold, a thin layer of water is sprayed on the sand or concrete to seal and level it (or in the case of concrete, to keep it from being marked).
  • This thin layer is painted white or pale blue, for better contrast; markings necessary for hockey or curling are also placed, along with logos or other decorations.
  • Another thin layer of water is sprayed on top of this.
  • The ice is built up to a thickness of 2-3 centimetres (approx. 1.2 inches) by repeated flows of water onto the surface.

Periodically after the ice has been used, it is resurfaced using a machine called an ice resurfacer, commonly known as a Zamboni. For curling, the surface is 'pebbled' by allowing loose drops of cold water to fall onto the ice and freeze into rounded peaks. Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... For other uses, see Paint (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about water ice. ... This article is about water ice. ... This article is about ice resurfacers, commonly called a Zamboni Machine. For other uses of Zamboni, see Zamboni (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about water ice. ...


Between events, especially if the arena is being used without need for the ice surface, it is either covered with a heavily insulated floor, or melted by heating the fluid in the pipes. This article is about water ice. ...


A highly specialized form of rink is used for speed skating; this is a large oval (or ring) much like an athletic track. Due to their limited use, speed skating ovals are found in much fewer numbers than is true of the more common hockey or curling rinks.[citation needed] Speed skating, or long track speedskating, long track speed skating, is an Olympic sport where competitors are timed while crossing a set distance. ... In geometry, an oval or ovoid (from Latin ovum, egg) is any curve resembling an egg or an ellipse. ...


Those skilled at preparing arena ice are often in demand for major events where ice quality is critical. The level of the sport of hockey in Canada has led its icemakers to be particularly sought-after. One such team of professionals was responsible for placing a loonie coin under center ice at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah; as both Canadian teams (men's and women's) won their respective hockey gold medals, the coin was christened "lucky" and is now in the possession of the Hockey Hall of Fame,[citation needed] after having been retrieved from beneath the ice. This article is about water ice. ... This article is about water ice. ... See also loony (nicknamed for loon), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the name Canadians gave the gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin shortly after its introduction. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... For ships of the United States Navy of the same name, see USS Salt Lake City. ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ...

Contents

Rink size

Speedskating

In speedskating, the official Olympic rink size is 100 x 200ft for short track, and 400 meters for long track.


Ice Hockey

Main article: Hockey rink hi everybody A hockey rink is an ice rink specifically designed for the game of ice hockey. ...


There are basically two rink sizes in use (as below), although there is a great deal of variation in the dimensions of actual ice rinks. Historically, earlier ice rinks were smaller than today. This article is about water ice. ... This article is about water ice. ...


National Hockey League (NHL) - Canada & USA

Official NHL rink size 85' x 200'


International/Olympic Ice Hockey

Official Olympic/International rink 30m x 60m (4*4)


See also

[1] At approximately 15:00 UTC on Monday January 2, 2006, the roof of a 1970s-built ice rink collapsed under the weight of heavy snowfall in the town of Bad Reichenhall, Bavaria, Germany, near the Austrian border, trapping 50 underneath the rubble. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are a number of ice rinks around Australia used for various ice sports. ...


External links

For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
IIHF - Ice Rink Manual (341 words)
Rinks with artificial ice can be built anywhere, even in the desert or south of the equator.
In order to show communities all over the planet that an ice rink is not one of the seventh wonders of the world, the IIHF decided to put a group of experts together to create a rink manual.
The goal of the manual is to help communities and hockey enthusiasts to build ice rinks in their neighborhoods, at reasonable costs.
ICE RINK SUPPLY - Ice Rink Manufacturer, Designer, Installer, Supplier, Maker, Equipment Supplier, Consulting, Builder, ... (621 words)
Ice Rink Supply welcomes you to the 21st Century of ice rink technology.
Ice Rink Supply refrigeration pipe grids are 400% more efficient than conventional pipe grids in use by others.
Ice Rink Supply provides a complete line of services, that includes planning, development, and expert construction of your ice rink equipment.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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