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Encyclopedia > Ice hockey stick
Hockey sticks, regular and goalie, measurements in cm.
Mi'kmaq making hockey sticks from hornbeam trees (Carpinus caroliniana) in Nova Scotia about 1890.

An ice hockey stick is a piece of equipment used in ice hockey to move the puck. Ice hockey sticks are approximately 150-200 cm long, composed of a long, slender shaft and a flat extension at one end called the blade. The blade is the part of the stick used to contact the puck, and is typically 25 to 40 cm long. Stick dimensions can vary widely, as they are usually built to suit a particular player's size. The blade is positioned at roughly a 135° angle from the axis of the shaft, giving the stick a partly 'L-shaped' appearance. The shaft of the stick is fairly rigid, but it has some flexibility to benefit some shots. Image File history File links Hockey_stick. ... Image File history File links Hockey_stick. ... Image File history File links Mikmac-hockey-sticks. ... Image File history File links Mikmac-hockey-sticks. ... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... Binomial name Walter The American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana) is a small hardwood tree in the genus Carpinus. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... A hockey stick is a piece of equipment used in field hockey, ice hockey, or roller hockey to move the ball or puck. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A shot in ice hockey is an attempt by a player to score a goal by striking the puck with his stick in the direction of the net. ...


The blade is often curved in the direction toward which the skater moves forward, to aid in retaining or lifting the puck off the playing surface.


The goaltender has a slightly modified stick. The lower part of the stick is wider, the angle is smaller, and the blade is slightly curved towards the direction of the play.

Contents

History

Hockey sticks were originally made from the hornbeam tree (Carpinus caroliniana) in Nova Scotia by the Mi'kmaqs sometimes referred to as the Dartmouth Indians.[1] But as the supply of hornbeam trees diminished, other hardwoods such as yellow birch and ash were used. Ash was the traditional wood of the Irish Hurley sticks. The world's purportedly oldest surviving hockey stick was carved between 1852 and 1856 and was sold on December 22, 2006 for $2.2 million (CAD).[2] The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... Binomial name Betula alleghaniensis Britt. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but... Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A hurley (Irish: camán) is a wooden stick approx one metre (three feet) long with a flattened, curved end, used to hit a sliotar (leather ball) in the Irish sport of hurling. ... “C$” redirects here. ...


In recent years, sticks made of more expensive Aluminum, fiberglass, carbon fiber and other composite materials have become common. In addition to weighing less, composite sticks can be manufactured with more consistent flexibility properties than their wooden counterparts. These sticks can be one-piece, or they can have replaceable wood or composite blades. Composite sticks, despite their greater expense, are now commonplace at nearly all competitive levels of the sport, including youth hockey. Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... Bundle of fiberglass Fiberglass (also called fibreglass and glass fibre) is material made from extremely fine fibers of glass. ... Graphite-reinforced plastic or carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP or CRP), is a strong, light and very expensive composite material or fibre reinforced plastic. ... A cloth of woven carbon fiber filaments, a common element in composite materials Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineered materials made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties and which remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. ...


Features

The lie of a stick refers to the angle between the shaft and the blade. A lie value of 5 corresponds to a 135° angle, and each additional lie value corresponds to a 2° smaller angle.[3] With the bottom of the blade flat on the ice, a higher lie value causes the shaft to stand up straighter. Typical values range from 5 to 7; most sticks now are near 5.5. Goalie sticks typically have a lie between 11 and 15.[4]


Flexibility

A used Royale Warrior hockey stick with a flex of 50.

Whip, bend, stiffness, and flex are all terms used to describe how a stick bows when taking a shot. The flex is printed on the side of the stick, typically ranging from 70 and 110. This number corresponds to the force that it takes to deflect or bend the shaft one inch. For example, a 100 flex requires 100 pounds force (444 N) to bend the shaft 1 inch. A 90 flex requires 90 pounds force (400 N) to bend the shaft 1 inch, and so on. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 116 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (124 × 640 pixel, file size: 26 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A picture I took of my ice hockey hockey stick. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 116 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (124 × 640 pixel, file size: 26 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A picture I took of my ice hockey hockey stick. ... Warrior Lacrosse is a company that manufactures lacrosse equipment and apparel. ...


Aggressive and defensive players lean towards using stiff shafts for stick-checking and controlled slap shots. For a decent slap shot the blade of the stick makes contact with the ice a few inches before the puck. The shaft bends (gets preloaded), loading it full of potential energy, then as you pull the stick through that bend it snaps back into position as it makes contact with the puck. All this force is transferred into the puck.
Finesse style players generally prefer flexible and light weight shafts for wrist shots, snap shots, stick handling, and shot accuracy. A flexible shaft provides more whip which translates into more velocity on shots. Smaller players tend to use more flexible shafts to increase power on slap and wrist shots. Checking in ice hockey is the act of physically keeping an opposing player in check. ...


Blade

At inception of the sport, the blade of the hockey stick was not curved. Stan Mikita was the first NHL player to use a curved blade.[5] A great deal of attention is placed on the contours of a stick's curve. A curve is characterized by the blade curves, the shape of the toe, and how the face is angled. A Toe Curve is used by Sergei Fedorov, and is considered good for puck handling and accurate wrist shots. A Heel Curve, such as that used by Brian Leetch and Eric Lindros is designed to maximize the blade's sweet spot, improving speed and accuracy on slap shots, and is often preferred by hard-shooting defensemen for this reason.[5] Sergei Viktorovich Fedorov (Russian:Сергей Викторович Фёдоров, Sergey Viktorovich Fyodorov; born December 13, 1969 in Pskov, Soviet Union; now Russia) is a professional ice hockey forward and occasional defenceman[1] who plays for the Columbus Blue Jackets in the National Hockey League. ... Brian Leetch (born March 3, 1968 in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA) is a professional ice hockey defenseman in the NHL, though he is currently an unsigned unrestricted free agent. ... Eric Bryan Lindros (born February 28, 1973 in London, Ontario, Canada) is a professional ice hockey player in the National Hockey League. ...


The toe shape is usually either round or square. Square toes make it easier to pull a puck off the boards, while round toes offer a small advantage in puck handling.


The face angle, or openness, of a blade has a large impact on a puck's trajectory when it is shot. If a blade is very open, it will be easier to shoot the puck high, while a closed face is more likely to produce a shot close to the ice.


Illegal curve

The curve of the blade is subject to strict rules in all levels of hockey. If the curve exceeds 1/2 an inch, the player is generally given a minor penalty.[6] This can be tested by lying the stick flat, and attempting to slip a vertical dime under the blade without touching. More accurate measurements can be made using a device which some referees are equipped with called a stick gauge. For the 2005-06 season, the NHL has changed the curve limit to 3/4 of an inch. In Canada a dime is a coin worth ten cents. ...


There is some controversy as to whether the NHL curve limit rule has any impact on game fairness; the argument being that the curve has no inherent advantage, and so the rules simply penalize players who prefer more curve. If the curve were inherently helpful, one would expect to find very few high-scoring players using slight curves; however, such players are in fact numerous. For example, NHL player Jarome Iginla uses a very slight curve and was awarded the Maurice Richard Trophy as the league's leading goal scorer of the 2003-2004 NHL season. Some other players regarded for their scoring abilities and who use slight curves are Chris Drury, Mike Modano, Marian Hossa, Marian Gaborik, Martin Havlat and Martin St. Louis. One event anecdotally supporting this theory occurred when NHL player Ilya Kovalchuk had been accused of breaking NHL curve limit rules by the Edmonton Oilers during a game. Kovalchuk was assessed a 2 minute minor penalty and was given a stick with a legal curve. Immediately after leaving the penalty box, Kovalchuk received a pass from a teammate and scored what would result in the game winning goal. After scoring Kovalchuk skated past the Oiler bench and pointed at his legal stick in mockery. Jarome Arthur-Leigh Adekunle Tig Junior Elvis Iginla [1], commonly known as Jarome Iginla, (born July 1, 1977 in St. ... The Maurice Rocket Richard Trophy, also known as the Maurice Richard Trophy[1] is awarded annually to the leading goal scorer in the National Hockey League. ... Christopher Chris Drury (born August 20, 1976 in Trumbull, Connecticut) is a professional ice hockey player who currently plays for the New York Rangers of the NHL. The younger brother of former player Ted Drury, Chris has won the Stanley Cup, the Calder Memorial Trophy, the Hobey Baker Memorial Award... Michael Thomas Modano, Jr. ... Marian Hossa, #18 (born January 12, 1979, in Stara Lubovna, Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia)) is a professional ice hockey right winger in the NHL, playing for the Ottawa Senators. ... Marián Gáborík born February 14, 1982 in Trenčín, Czechoslovakia) is a Slovak professional ice hockey player. ... Martin Havlát, #9 (born April 19, 1981) is an ice hockey player with the Ottawa Senators of the NHL. He is nicknamed Mach 9 for his speed and player number. ... Martin St. ... Ilya Valeryevich Kovalchuk (Russian: Илья Валерьевич Ковальчук, Ilja Valerjevič Kovalčuk; born April 15, 1983, in Tver, USSR) is a professional ice hockey player. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Tape

The blade of the stick is nearly always wrapped partially in friction tape, a cotton tape that has been impregnated with adhesive so that it is sticky on one side. This is generally done to improve puck handling and to avoid water damage to the stick. The tape is generally replaced once its adhesion is impaired, or it begins to feel heavy. Preferred amounts of puck adhesion vary among players: some players will use a regular cloth tape instead of friction tape, while Wayne Gretzky used friction tape but then applied baby powder to lower its adhesion.[5] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Talcum Powder Baby powder is an astringent powder used for preventing rashes on the area covered by a diaper (see diaper rash). ...


There is also variation in colour, white or black being predominant. Some hockey players use black tape because they believe it camouflages the puck making it harder for the goalie to see. Luc Robitaille used black tape in the first and third periods but white tape in the second.[5]
Luc Robitaille playing for the Los Angeles Kings on December 21, 2005 Lucky Luc Robitaille (born February 17, 1966 in Montréal, Québec, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey player. ...


References

  1. ^ Vaughan, Garth. "MicMac" Hockey Sticks. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  2. ^ "Oldest hockey stick goes for $2.2 million", Canadian Press, 2006-12-22. Retrieved on 2006-12-22. 
  3. ^ Hockey Stick Sizing Guide at prohockeystuff.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  4. ^ How To Buy a Hockey Stick at MVP.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  5. ^ a b c d Ferguson, Bill http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_hockey_stick. Stick styles. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  6. ^ Fitzpatrick, Jamie. Illegal Stick. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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