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Encyclopedia > Ice cream cone
A stack of sugar ice-cream cones
A stack of sugar ice-cream cones

An ice-cream cone or cornet is a cone-shaped pastry, usually made of a wafer similar in texture to a waffle, in which ice cream is served, allowing it to be eaten without a bowl or spoon. Various types of ice-cream cones include waffle cones, wafer cones (incorrectly referred to as cake cones), and sugar cones. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of Sugar ice cream cones from http://pdphoto. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of Sugar ice cream cones from http://pdphoto. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article is about the food item. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ...


History

The exact origin of the ice-cream cone is unknown, but it is known to be invented by Italo Marcioni, an Italian man. An 1807 engraving shows a woman consuming an ice-cream cone at Frascati, a restaurant in Paris, France. Frascati opened in 1789, but food historians do not know when the restaurant first served ice-cream cones or if it was the first to do so. Paper and metal cones were used during the 19th century in France, Germany, and Britain for holding ice cream.Ice cream has been the most known dessert in the U.S. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

An early printed reference to an edible cone is in Mrs A. B. Marshall's Cookery Book, written in 1888 by celebrated cookery writer Agnes Marshall. Her recipe for "Cornet with Cream" says that - "the cornets were made with almonds and baked in the oven, not pressed between irons". She adds - "these cornets can also be filled with any cream or water ice or set custard or fruits, and served for a dinner, luncheon, or supper dish". Mrs Marshall was an influential innovator and greatly popularised ice cream in Britain. She published two recipe books specifically about ice cream and also patented an ice-cream making machine. (See [1] and [2])

Strawberry ice cream in a cone.
Strawberry ice cream in a cone.
Chocolate ice cream in a "kiddie cup"
Chocolate ice cream in a "kiddie cup"

In the United States, ice-cream cones were popularized in the first decade of the 20th century. On December 13, 1903, a New Yorker named Italo Marchioni received U.S. patent No. 746971 for a mold for making pastry cups to hold ice cream; he claimed that he has been selling ice cream in edible pastry holders since 1896. Contrary to popular belief, his patent was not for a cone and he lost the lawsuits that he filed against cone manufacturers for patent infringement. Image File history File linksMetadata StrawberryIce. ... Image File history File linksMetadata StrawberryIce. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 411 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1092 × 1594 pixel, file size: 658 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 411 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1092 × 1594 pixel, file size: 658 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ...


The ice cream cone was invented in St. Louis, Missouri in 1904 at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition-- not in New Jersey. According to one legend, a Syrian pastry maker, Ernst Hamwi, who was selling zalabia, a crisp pastry cooked in a hot waffle-patterned press came to the aid of a neighboring ice cream vendor (perhaps Arnold Fornachou) who had run out of dishes; Hamwi rolled a warm zalabia into a cone that could hold ice cream. However, numerous vendors sold pastries at the World's Fair, and several of them claimed to have invented the ice-cream cone, citing a variety of inspirations. Hamwi's story is largely based on a letter he wrote in 1928 to the Ice Cream Trade Journal, long after he had established the Cornucopia Waffle Company (later the Missouri Cone Company). Nationally, by that time, the ice-cream cone industry was producing some 250 million cones a year. Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The owners of Doumar's Cones and BBQ in Norfolk, Virginia claim that their uncle, Abe Doumar, sold the first ice-cream cones at the St. Louis World's Fair. Other World's Fair vendors who claimed to have invented the cone include Nick and Albert Kabbaz, David Avayou, and Charles and Frank Menches. Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ...


The first cones were rolled by hand but, in 1912, Frederick Bruckman, an inventor from Portland, Oregon, patented a machine for rolling ice-cream cones. He sold his company to Nabisco in 1928. Nabisco is still producing ice-cream cones, as it has been since 1928. Independent ice-cream providers such as Ben & Jerry's make their own ice-cream cones. 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Nabisco logo Nabisco is an American manufacturer of cookies and snacks, including brands such as Chips Ahoy!, Fig Newtons, Mallomars, Oreos, Premium Crackers, Ritz Crackers, Teddy Grahams, Triscuits, Wheat Thins, and Chicken in a Biskit. ... Nabisco logo Nabisco is an American manufacturer of cookies and snacks, including brands such as Chips Ahoy!, Fig Newtons, Mallomars, Oreos, Premium Crackers, Ritz Crackers, Teddy Grahams, Triscuits, Wheat Thins, and Chicken in a Biskit. ... Ben & Jerrys is a brand of ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and ice cream novelty products, manufactured by Ben & Jerrys Homemade Holdings, Inc. ...


The idea of selling a frozen ice-cream cone had long been a dream of ice-cream makers, but it wasn't until 1959 that Spica, an Italian ice-cream manufacturer based in Naples conquered the problem of the ice-cream making the cone go soggy. Spica invented a process, whereby the inside of the waffle cone was insulated from the ice-cream by a layer of oil, sugar and chocolate. Spica registered the name Cornetto in 1960. Initial sales were poor, but in 1976 Unilever bought out Spica and began a mass-marketing campaign throughout Europe. It is now one of the most popular ice creams in the world.[citation needed] Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Cornetto is a branded frozen ice-cream cone, manufactured by Unilever and marketed throughout the world under various different company names. ... Unilever is a widely listed [2] [3] multi-national corporation, formed of Anglo-Dutch parentage, that owns many of the worlds consumer product brands in foods, beverages, cleaning agents and personal care products. ...


In recent years, some brands have started to produce something very similar to the traditional ice-cream cone, but with a flat bottom, which enables it to stand upright without danger of falling. These new types of wafer cup are called "kiddie cups" or "cool cups".


A variety of cone exists that allows two scoops of ice cream to be served side by side, instead of the usual straight up order.


Trivia

"Ice-cream cone sign" in neuroradiology is a way to refer to a tumour, the schwannoma of the VIIIth nerve, due to its shape; the part of the tumour located inside the internal auditory meatus being the cone, and the part of the tumour extruding toward the pons being the ball above the cone. Schwannomas, also referred to as Neurilomas, are slow-growing central nervous system tumours arising from the supporting cells of peripheral nerves, which include cranial and spinal nerve roots). ... For other uses, see Nerve (disambiguation). ... Near the center of the posterior surface of the temporal bone is a large orifice, the internal acoustic meatus (or internal auditory meatus), the size of which varies considerably; its margins are smooth and rounded, and it leads into a short canal, about 1 cm. ... For other uses, see Pons (disambiguation). ...


References

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
IDFA - History of the Ice Cream Cone (458 words)
Hamwi saw an easy solution to the ice cream vendor's problem: he quickly rolled one of his wafer-like waffles in the shape of a cone, or cornucopia, and gave it to the ice cream vendor.
The cone cooled in a few seconds, the vendor put some ice cream in it, the customers were happy and the cone was on its way to becoming the great American institution that it is today.
The second type of cone was molded either by pouring batter into a shell, inserting a core on which the cone was baked, and then removing the core; or pouring the batter into a mold, baking it and then splitting the mold so the cone could be removed with little difficulty.
Ice Cream Cone, History of Ice Cream Cone (4628 words)
Ice cream in a cup also became known as a "toot," which many have been derived from the Italian word "tutti" or "all," as customers were urged to "Eat it all." They were also known as "wafers," "oublies," "plaisirs," "gaufres," "cialde," "cornets," and "cornucopias."
Hamwi was interviewed by The Ice Cream Trade Journal in the May 1928 issue, and he was quoted as saying that he was located next to an ice cream booth at the 1904 exhibition.
At the close of the 1904 St. Louis Fair, the popularity of this of eating ice cream in a "cone" had industries racing to produce molds and machines to be used for baking ice cream cones.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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