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Encyclopedia > Iapetus (mythology)
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius

In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. Greek mythology comprises the collected narratives of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek Μουσαι, Mousai) are nine archaic goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song and traditional music and dances. ... Asclepius Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Phoebe, a Titan traditionally associated with the moon. ... Cronus receives the Omphalos Stone from his wife Rhea and devours it unaware that Zeus was safe; painting was made between 475 B.C. and 425 B.C. Cronus (of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned), pronounced: kroh-nuhs , also spelled Cronos or Kronos, is often confused with Chronos/Khronos. ... Rhea tricks her husband Cronus by giving him the Omphalos Stone instead of Zeus. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... Themis was the name given by William Henry Pickering in 1905 to a spurious tenth satellite of Saturn which he claimed to have discovered. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was a member of a race of giant gods known as Titans. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus, or Prometheas (Ancient Greek, Προμηθεύς, forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from the gods in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ... Epimetheus, a Titan known for his hindsight, with Pandora and Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... Greek mythology comprises the collected narratives of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Ouranos is the Greek name of the sky, latinized as Uranus. ... Gaia, the Earth-goddess; classical Greek cup signed by Aristophanes and made between 410 B.C. and 400 B.C. Gaia (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, Clymene or Klymenê (famous might) is the name of at least six possibly distinct females. ... Asia or Clymene in Greek mythology, is a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, the wife of the Titan Iapetus, and mother of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus and Menoetius. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was a member of a race of giant gods known as Titans. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus, or Prometheas (Ancient Greek, Προμηθεύς, forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from the gods in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ... Epimetheus, a Titan known for his hindsight, with Pandora and Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ...


Iapetus is the one Titan mentioned by Homer in the Iliad (8.478–81) as being in Tartarus with Cronus. For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The Iliad (Greek Ιλιάς, Ilias) tells part of the story of the siege of the city of Ilium, i. ... In Greek mythology, Tartarus, or Tartaros, is both a deity and a place in the underworld — even lower than Hades. ... Cronus receives the Omphalos Stone from his wife Rhea and devours it unaware that Zeus was safe; painting was made between 475 B.C. and 425 B.C. Cronus (of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned), pronounced: kroh-nuhs , also spelled Cronos or Kronos, is often confused with Chronos/Khronos. ...


Iapetus' wife is normally a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys named Clymene or Asia. Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, Clymene or Klymenê (famous might) is the name of at least six possibly distinct females. ... Asia or Clymene in Greek mythology, is a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, the wife of the Titan Iapetus, and mother of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus and Menoetius. ...


But in Aeschylus's play Prometheus Bound, Prometheus is son of the goddess Themis with no father named (but still with at least Atlas as a brother). Aeschylus (525 BC—456 BC; Greek: Αισχυλος) was a playwright of ancient Greece. ... Themis was the name given by William Henry Pickering in 1905 to a spurious tenth satellite of Saturn which he claimed to have discovered. ...


Since mostly the Titans indulge in marriage of brother and sister, it might be that Aeschylus is using an old tradition in which Themis is Iapetus' wife but that the Hesiodic tradition preferred that Themis and Mnemosyne be consorts of Zeus alone. But it would have been quite within Achaean practice for Zeus to have taken the wives of the Titans as his mistresses after throwing down their husbands. Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ...


Pausanias (8.27.15) writes:

As I have already related, the boundary between Megalopolis and Heraea is at the source of the river Buphagus. The river got its name, they say, from a hero called Buphagus, the son of Iapetus and Thornax. This is what they call her in Laconia also. They also say that Artemis shot Buphagus on Mount Pholoe because he attempted an unholy sin against her godhead.

Buphagus is a tributary of the river Alpheus, Thornax is a mountain between Sparta and Sellasia, and Pholoe is a mountain between Arcadia and Elis. Megalopolis (Greek: large city, great city) can mean: The city of Megalópoli (Μεγαλοπολη), Megalopolis, Greece. ... Laconia (Λακωνία; see also List of traditional Greek place names), also known as Lacedaemonia, was in ancient Greece the portion of the Peloponnesus of which the most important city was Sparta. ... The Artemis of Versailles, a Roman copy of a Hellenistic marble sculpture, now at the Louvre Museum. ... In Greek mythology, Alpheus, or Alpheios (Greek: Αλφειός, meaning whitish) was a river (present Alfeios River) and river-god, thus like most river-gods a son of Oceanus and Tethys. ... Arcadia or Arkadía (Greek Αρκαδία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a region of Greece in the Peloponnesus. ... Elis, or Eleia (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Ήλις, also Ilis, Doric: Άλις) is an ancient district within the modern prefecture of Ilia. ...


Stephanus of Byzantium quotes Athenodorus of Tarsus: Stephanus Byzantinus (Stephanus of Byzantium), the author of a geographical dictionary entitled Εθνικα (Ethnica), of which, apart from some fragments, we possess only the meagre epitome of one Hermolaus. ...

Anchiale, daughter of Iapetus, founded Anchiale (a city near Tarsus): her son was Cydnus, who gave his name to the river at Tarsus: the son of Cydnus was Parthenius, from whom the city was called Parthenia: afterwards the name was changed to Tarsus.

This may be the same Anchiale who appears in the Argonautica (1.1120f): Tarsus is a city in present day Turkey, on the mouth of the Tarsus Cay (Cydnus) into the Mediterranean. ... This article or section should be merged with Jason. ...

And near it they heaped an altar of small stones, and wreathed their brows with oak leaves and paid heed to sacrifice, invoking the Mother of Dindymum, Most Venerable, Dweller in Phrygia, and Titias and Cyllenus, who alone of many are called dispensers of doom and assessors of the Idaean Mother, – the Idaean Dactyls of Crete, whom once the nymph Anchiale, as she grasped with both hands the land of Oaxus, bare in the Dictaean cave.

Iapetus is sometimes equated by Creationists with Japheth, the son of Noah, based on the similarity of their names, though scholars of Indo-European linguistics dispute such an equation vehemently. In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian highlands, part of modern Turkey, from ca. ... In Greek mythology, the Dactyls were the archaic race of small phallic male beings associated with the Great Mother, whether as Cybele or Rhea, spirit-men like the Curetes, Cabiri and Korybantes. ... Greece and Crete Crete, sometimes spelled Krete (Greek Κρήτη / Kriti; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest of the Greek islands and the fifth largest in the Mediterranean Sea. ... Japheth (יֶפֶת / יָפֶת enlarge, Standard Hebrew Yéfet / Yáfet, Tiberian Hebrew Yép̄eṯ / Yāp̄eṯ) is one of the sons of Noah in the Bible. ... The sons of Noah are named in Genesis 10 as Shem, Ham, and Japheth. ...


External link

  • Theoi Project: Ouranos: Iapetos

  Results from FactBites:
 
IAPETUS : Greek Titan god of mortality ; mythology : IAPETOS, JAPETUS (1782 words)
IAPETOS (or Iapetus) was one of the Titan gods, sons of Ouranos (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth).
IA′PETUS (Iapetos), a son of Uranus and Ge, a Titan and brother of Cronus, Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Tethys, Rhea, andc.
479) Iapetus is imprisoned with Cronus in Tartarus, and Silius Italicus (xii.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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