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Encyclopedia > Ian McKellen
Sir Ian McKellen

McKellen at the premiere of The Return of the King in Wellington, New Zealand, December 1, 2003
Born 25 May 1939 (1939-05-25) (age 68)
Burnley, Lancashire, England
Years active 1965 - present
Domestic partner(s) Brian Taylor (1964-1972)
Sean Mathias (1978-1988)
Official website

Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CH, CBE (born 25 May 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of the Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. He is best known for working and comprising specific roles such as Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy and as Magneto in the X-Men films. His work has spanned genres from serious Shakespearean and modern theatre to popular fantasy and science fiction. He was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1979, and knighted in the 1991 New Year Honours for his outstanding work and contributions to the theatre.[1][2][3] In the 2008 New Year Honours he was made a Companion of Honour (CH) for services to drama and to equality.[4] Image File history File links Ian_McKellen. ... Alternative meanings at Wellington (disambiguation) A view of Wellington from the top of Mount Victoria. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings see Burnley (disambiguation) , Burnley is a large town in the borough of Burnley in Lancashire, England, with a population of about 73,021. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television For the main article see Golden Globe Award. ... Grigori Rasputin Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (Russian: ) (22 January [O.S. 10 January] 1869 – 29 December [O.S. 16 December] 1916) was a Russian mystic with an influence in the later days of Russias Romanov dynasty. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in film. ... The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in film. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Playbill, 1981 For other uses, see Amadeus (disambiguation). ... An incomplete list of the winners of the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures Award for Best Actor : // 1970: George C. Scott for his role in Patton 1971: Gene Hackman for his role in The French Connection 1972: Peter OToole for his roles in Man of La Mancha... Gods and Monsters is a 1998 film which recounts the (somewhat fictionalized) last days of the life of troubled film director James Whale, whose homosexuality is a central theme. ... The National Board of Review Award for Best Acting by an Ensemble is an annual film award (since 1994) given by the National Board of Review. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Supporting Actor (in a film): ... Apt Pupil (1982) is a novella by Stephen King, originally published in Different Seasons (1982). ... One of the A festivals in Europe. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The X-Men film series currently consists of three superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics team of the same name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ...


In 1988, he came out as gay and became a founding member of Stonewall, one of the United Kingdom's most influential LGBT rights groups, of which he remains a prominent spokesman. GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... 1988 Sir Ian McKellen and Michael Cashman of Stonewall. ... LGBT social movements is a collective term for a number of movements that share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality and/or gender variance. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

McKellen was born in Burnley, Lancashire, England, though spent most of his early life in Wigan and later attended Bolton School. Born shortly before the outbreak of World War II, the experience had some lasting impact on him. In an interview with The Advocate magazine (December 25, 2001), when an interviewer remarked that he seemed quite calm in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attack, he said: "Well, darling, you forget — I slept under a steel plate until I was four years old."[5] For other meanings see Burnley (disambiguation) , Burnley is a large town in the borough of Burnley in Lancashire, England, with a population of about 73,021. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... , Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... Bolton School is a public school (independent school) situated in the town of Bolton, Greater Manchester in the North-West of England. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


McKellen's father, Denis Murray McKellen, a civil engineer, was a lay preacher, and both of his grandfathers were preachers as well. At the time of Ian's birth, his parents already had a five-year-old daughter Jean. His home environment was strongly Christian, but non-orthodox. "My upbringing was of low nonconformist Christians who felt that you led the Christian life in part by behaving in a Christian manner to everybody you met."[5] When he was 12, his mother, Margery Lois (née Sutcliffe) died; his father died when he was 24. When he came out of the closet to his stepmother, Gladys McKellen, who was a Friend (Quaker): "Not only was she not fazed, but as a member of a society which declared its indifference to people's sexuality years back, I think she was just glad for my sake that I wasn't lying any more."[5] A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Née redirects here. ... For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... Quaker redirects here. ...


McKellen attended Bolton School (boys division),[6] of which he is still a supporter, attending regularly to talk to pupils. McKellen's acting career started at Bolton Little Theatre,[7] of which he is now the Patron. An early fascination with theatre was encouraged by his parents, who took him on a family outing to Peter Pan at the Manchester Opera House when he was three. When he was nine, his main Christmas present was a wood and bakelite, fold-away Victorian Theatre from Pollocks Toy Theatres, with cardboard scenery and wires to push on the cut-outs of Cinderella and of Olivier's Hamlet. His sister took him to his first Shakespeare play, Twelfth Night, by the amateurs of Wigan's Little Theatre, shortly followed by their Macbeth and Wigan High School for Girls' production of A Midsummer Night's Dream with music by Mendelssohn and with the role of Bottom played by Jean McKellen. (Until her recent death, Jean still acted, directed, and produced amateur theatre.) This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ... Manchester Opera House The Opera House in Manchester, England is a 2000 seat commercial touring theatre which plays host to touring musicals, ballet, concerts and a spectactular Christmas pantomime. ... Pollocks Toy Museum is a small museum in London, England. ... For other uses of Twelfth Night, see Twelfth Night (disambiguation). ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ...


He won a scholarship to St. Catharine's College, University of Cambridge, when he was eighteen, where he developed an attraction to Derek Jacobi.[8] He has characterized it as "a passion that was undeclared and unrequited".[5] He and his first serious partner, Brian Taylor, a history teacher from Bolton,[9] began their relationship in 1964. It was a relationship that was to last for eight years, ending in 1972. They lived in London, where McKellen continued to pursue his career as an actor. For over a decade he has lived in a five-story Victorian conversion in Narrow Street, Limehouse, London.[10] In 1978 he met his second partner, Sean Mathias, at the Edinburgh Festival. According to Mathias, the ten-year love affair was tempestuous, with conflicts over McKellen's success in acting versus Mathias' somewhat less-successful career. Full name Collegium sive aula D. Catharinæ in Universitate Cantabrigiensi Motto   For the wheel! (unofficial) Named after St Catharine of Alexandria Previous names Katharine Hall (1473-1860) Established 1473 Sister College(s) Worcester College Master Prof. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Bolton. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Narrow Street is just that, a narrow street running parallel to the River Thames through the Limehouse area of east London ( ). Narrow Street 1827 Narrow Street 1993 // A combination of tides and currents made this point on the Thames a natural landfall for ships, the first wharf being completed in... , Limehouse Town Hall Limehouse is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Sean Gerard Mathias (born 14 March 1956) is a British theatre director, film director, writer and actor. ... There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


Twenty years ago McKellen lost his appetite for meat except for fish and became a pescetarian.[11] For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Pescetarianism is a dietary choice, in which a person — known as a pescetarian — will not eat the flesh of any animals other than fish or other types of seafood. ...


Theatrical career

Sir Ian McKellen takes a day out at Universal Studios, Hollywood, April 2000.
Sir Ian McKellen takes a day out at Universal Studios, Hollywood, April 2000.

McKellen made his stage debut in Coventry in 1961 and his West End debut in 1964. His first film role — in the unfinished The Bells of Hell Go Ting-A-Ling-A-Ling (1966) — produced a £4000 fee that helped fund his repertory work for a time, but the experience contributed to a focus on the stage,[12] which remained the medium he was best known for well into the fourth decade of his career. Image File history File links IanMcKellen1. ... Image File history File links IanMcKellen1. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Repertory or rep, called stock in the U.S., is a term from Western theatre. ...


The role that made McKellen famous was his 1969 portrayal of King Edward II of England in the Prospect Theatre Company's touring production of Marlowe's Edward II.[8] The production was controversial for its explicit torture scenes and implicit homosexuality. He later reprised the role for the BBC. In 1972, he founded the Actors' Company with his friend Edward Petherbridge, and this was the beginning of his reputation as a spokesman for actors and the British theatre in general. Between 1974 and 1978, he played leading roles in Royal Shakespeare Company productions such as Romeo and Juliet (in which he played opposite Francesca Annis); a legendary production of Macbeth (opposite Judi Dench); and Trevor Nunn's 1977 production of The Alchemist by Ben Jonson, in which he played Face. Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Christopher Marlowe (baptised February 26, 1564–May 30, 1593) was an English dramatist, poet and translator of the Elizabethan era. ... Edward II is an Elizabethan play written by Christopher Marlowe. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Edward Petherbridge (born on August 3, 1936 in Bradford) is a British actor. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Francesca Annis as Lady Macbeth in Roman Polanskis Macbeth (1971). ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Sir Trevor King (born 14 January 1940) is a loser and film director. ... David Garrick as Abel Drugger in Jonsons The Alchemist by Johann Zoffany. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ...


McKellen starred on Broadway in Bent, a play about gay men in Nazi death camps, starting in 1979.[8] Despite his role in the play, which brought to public view for the first time in a widespread way the persecution of gays in Nazi Germany, McKellen was not yet out publicly.[8] At first, he was unsure whether he dared to take the role. "As impressed as I was by it, I thought 'My God! Do I dare be in this?' And [then-boyfriend] Sean read it and replied, 'Well you have to do it'."[5] Since starring in the original Broadway production of Bent, he has been involved in two other productions of the play. In 1990, he starred in the revival at the National Theatre in London directed by Mathias, and also made a supporting appearance in the movie version, also directed by Mathias, which was released in 1997. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Poster for the Royal National Theatre production of Bent Bent is a 1979 play (which starred Ian McKellen in its original West-End production, Richard Gere in its original Broadway production) by Martin Sherman that was adapted into a 1997 movie by director Sean Mathias. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Extermination camps were two types of facilities that Nazi Germany built during World War II for the systematic killing of millions of people in what has become known as the Holocaust. ... Once vibrant, Eldorado gay night club in Berlin after being shut down in 1933 Gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbians, were two of several groups targeted by Nazis during the Holocaust. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre is a building complex and theatre company located on the South Bank in London, England immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ...


McKellen won more and more parts, until eventually in 1980 he won the role of Salieri in the Broadway production of Amadeus. He was awarded the Tony Award for his performance, an honour he was also nominated for in 1984 for his one-man Shakespeare recital Acting Shakespeare. His appearance as Walter, a mentally-handicapped adult adjusting to life on his own after the death of his mother, in a 1982 television play shown on the first night of Channel 4's broadcasting, won him a new following; but he was still a relative unknown to much of the U.S. public. In 1994 McKellen put together a one-man show, A Knight Out. The show was very successful, and he still performs it today, considering it a perpetual "work in progress". He is a benefactor of the Rose Theatre in London and in January 2006 unveiled a blue plaque on the outside of the building.[13] McKellen is also active in fostering young people's interest in the stage, and is a dedicated patron of Theatre Peckham, a performing arts charity based on the Sceaux Gardens Estate in Peckham, which provides professional training for young people in Southwark.[14] Antonio Salieri Antonio Salieri (August 18, 1750 – May 7, 1825), was an Italian composer and conductor. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Playbill, 1981 For other uses, see Amadeus (disambiguation). ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Acting Shakespeare is a one-man show of Shakespearean speeches devised and performed by Ian McKellen. ... This article is about the British television station. ... , The Rose was an Elizabethan theatre. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ...


In 2007, he returned to the Royal Shakespeare Company, appearing in Trevor Nunn's productions of The Seagull (sharing the role of Sorin with William Gaunt) and in the title role of King Lear, to great acclaim.[15] Germaine Greer, a Shakespeare scholar, famously commented on the disrobing scene which featured McKellen's "impressive genitalia" but critically panned the production, lamenting of McKellen's portrayal that "such virtuosic caricature makes sympathy impossible".[16] But most of McKellen's notices were raves, with critic Ian Shuttleworth writing "Every moment is beautifully pitched, from the initial 'division of the kingdom' speech which he reads off cue cards to his final expiration, almost inadvertently, between phrases of grief for the dead Cordelia. This is not a Lear who blows and cracks his cheeks to vie with the storm on the heath; he feels his control slipping little by little, until he is utterly distracted but never raging or raving." [17]The production of King Lear also featured appearances by Sylvester McCoy and Jonathan Hyde. He will reprise his role in the 2008 TV film of the same name. Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... Sir Trevor King (born 14 January 1940) is a loser and film director. ... Chekhov in an 1898 portrait by Osip Braz. ... Appeared in 1963/64/65 series SGT CORK as DC Bob Marriat made 60 1hr episodes with John Barrie who stared as Sgt Cork Alexandra Bastedo, Stuart Damon and William Gaunt in The Champions. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Sylvester McCoy (born Percy James Patrick Kent-Smith August 20, 1943) is a Scottish actor. ... Jonathan Hyde (born May 21, 1947) is an Australian-born English stage actor. ...


Popular success

McKellen had taken film roles throughout his career - beginning in 1969 with A Touch of Love, excluding the unreleased The Bells of Hell Go Ting-A-Ling-A-Ling (1966) – but it was not until the 1990s that he became more widely recognised in this medium, through several roles in blockbuster Hollywood movies. Charlotte Burton Harry von Meter A Touch of Love was a 1915 American silent short film directed by Tom Ricketts starring Charlotte Burton, Jack Richardson, Vivian Rich and Harry von Meter. ...


In 1993, McKellen had a supporting role as a South African tycoon in the sleeper hit Six Degrees of Separation, in which he starred with Stockard Channing, Donald Sutherland, and Will Smith. In the same year, he was also exposed to North American audiences in minor roles in the television miniseries Tales of the City (based on the novel by his friend Armistead Maupin) and the movie Last Action Hero, in which he played Death. Also in 1993, McKellen played a large role in the TV movie And the Band Played On, about the discovery of the AIDS virus. A sleeper hit (often simply called a sleeper) refers to a film, book, album, TV show, or video game that gains unexpected success or recognition. ... For the Battlestar Galactica episode, see Six Degrees of Separation (Battlestar Galactica). ... Stockard Channing press kit photo Stockard Channing (born Susan Antonia Williams Stockard on February 13, 1944) is an American actress. ... For other persons named Donald Sutherland, see Donald Sutherland (disambiguation). ... “W. S.” redirects here. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... 1st US edition cover of the first book in the Tales of the City series This article is about the novel series; see also Tales of the City (novel) and Tales of the City (miniseries) Tales of the City is a series of six books, originally serialized in the San... Armistead Jones Maupin Jr. ... Last Action Hero is a 1993 action comedy directed by John McTiernan. ... A Western depiction of Death as a skeleton carrying a scythe. ... And the Band Played On is an Emmy award-winning 1993 television drama film based on the best-selling 1987 non-fiction book And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


In 1995, he played the title role in Richard III, a film he also co-wrote (adapting the play for the screen based on a stage production of Shakespeare's play directed by Richard Eyre for the Royal National Theatre) and co-produced.[8] In McKellen's role as executive producer he returned his £50,000 fee in order to complete the filming of the final battle.[12] His performance in the title role was critically acclaimed, and he was nominated for Golden Globe and BAFTA awards, and won the European Film Award for best actor. Richard III is a 1995 film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Richard III, starring Sir Ian McKellen, Annette Bening, Jim Broadbent, and Robert Downey Jr. ... Sir Richard Eyre, (born 28 March 1943), is a British film and theatre director. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre is a building complex and theatre company located on the South Bank in London, England immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The European Movie Awards are the most prestigious paneuropean movie awards. ...


His breakthrough role for mainstream American audiences came with the modestly acclaimed Apt Pupil, based on a story by Stephen King. McKellen portrayed an old Nazi officer, living under a false name in the U.S., who was befriended by a curious teenager (Brad Renfro) who threatened to expose him unless he told his story in detail. His casting was based partly on his performance in Cold Comfort Farm, seen by Apt Pupil-director Bryan Singer despite the BBFC's refusal to release it in cinemas.[12] He was subsequently nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the 1998 film Gods and Monsters, where he played James Whale, the gay director of Show Boat (1936) and Frankenstein.[8] Apt Pupil is a 1998 film, directed by Bryan Singer and starring Ian McKellen and Brad Renfro. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alias. ... Bradley Barron Renfro (July 25, 1982 - May 22, 2007) was an American actor, born in Knoxville, Tennessee and was raised by his grandmother. ... Cold Comfort Farm is a comic novel by Stella Gibbons, published in 1932. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... British Board of Film Classification logo The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), originally British Board of Film Censors, is the organisation responsible for film and some video game classification and censorship within the United Kingdom. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Gods and Monsters is a 1998 film which recounts the (somewhat fictionalized) last days of the life of troubled film director James Whale, whose homosexuality is a central theme. ... James Whale (July 22, 1889 – May 29, 1957) was a ground-breaking British Hollywood film director, best known for his work in the horror movie genre, making such pictures as Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, and The Invisible Man. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ...

Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, for which he earned an Academy Award nomination.
Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, for which he earned an Academy Award nomination.

McKellen has become a major global star by playing leading roles in blockbuster films. He reteamed with Apt Pupil director Bryan Singer to play the comic book character Magneto in X-Men and its sequels X2: X-Men United and X-Men: The Last Stand.[8] It was while filming X-Men that he was cast as the wizard Gandalf in Peter Jackson's three-film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings (consisting of The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King). McKellen received honors from the Screen Actors Guild for Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture for his work in The Fellowship of the Ring and was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for the same role. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x843, 193 KB)Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x843, 193 KB)Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... This page is about the 2003 movie X2; see X2 (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


On 16 March 2002, he was the host on Saturday Night Live. In 2003, McKellen made a guest appearance as himself on the American cartoon show The Simpsons, in a special British-themed episode entitled "The Regina Monologues", along with Tony Blair and J. K. Rowling. In April and May 2005, he played the role of Mel Hutchwright in Granada Television's long running soap opera, Coronation Street, fulfilling a lifelong ambition. He is also known for his voicework, having narrated Richard Bell's Eighteen, as a grandfather who leaves his World War II memoirs on audiocassette for his teenage grandson. is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... SNL redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Regina Monologues is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, which originally aired November 23, 2003. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Richard Bell (1859, Merthyr Tydfil—1 May 1930) was one of the first two British Labour Members of Parliament elected after the formation of the Labour Representation Committee in 1900. ...


McKellen has also appeared in limited release films, such as Emile (which was shot in a few days during the X2 shoot), Neverwas and Asylum. He appeared as Sir Leigh Teabing in The Da Vinci Code. During a 17 May 2006 interview on The Today Show with the Da Vinci Code cast and director, Matt Lauer posed a question to the group about how they would have felt if the film had borne a prominent disclaimer that it is a work of fiction, as some religious groups wanted.[18] McKellen responded, "I've often thought the Bible should have a disclaimer in the front saying 'This is fiction.' I mean, walking on water? It takes... an act of faith. And I have faith in this movie — not that it's true, not that it's factual, but that it's a jolly good story." He continued, "And I think audiences are clever enough and bright enough to separate out fact and fiction, and discuss the thing when they've seen it".[19] McKellen also appeared in the 2006 series of Ricky Gervais' comedy series Extras, where he played himself directing Gervais' character Andy Millman in a play about gay lovers. McKellen received a 2007 Emmy nomination for his performance. Movie poster for the 2003 movie of Emile, featuring Ian McKellen. ... Asylum is a 2005 film directed by David Mackenzie. ... This article is about the film. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Today Show, officially known as Today, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on NBC. Debuting on January 14, 1952, it was the first of its genre, spawning similar morning news and entertainment television programs across the United States and around the world. ... Matthew Todd Lauer (December 30, 1957)[2] is an American television personality, best known as a co-host of NBCs The Today Show (since 1994)[2] after being a news anchor in New York [3] and a local talk-show host in Boston, Philadelphia, Providence, and Richmond. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... Not to be confused with Extra (TV series). ... Andy Millman is a character from the BBC/HBO co-production Extras. ... An Emmy Award. ...


LGBT rights campaigning

Ian McKellen (left) with Michael Cashman at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28 in 1988
Ian McKellen (left) with Michael Cashman at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28 in 1988

While McKellen had made his sexual deviance known to his fellow actors early on in his stage career, it was not until 1988 that he came out to the general public, in a programme on BBC Radio 3.[8] The context that prompted McKellen's decision — overriding concerns about a possible negative effect on his career — was that the controversial amendment known popularly as "Section 28" (see below) was under consideration in the United Kingdom Parliament.[8] By this time, McKellen's ten-year relationship with Mathias had ended, removing the additional concern of what effect his coming out would have on his partner's career. McKellen has stated that he was also influenced in his decision by the advice and support of his friends, among them noted gay author Armistead Maupin. 1988 With Michael Cashman at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28, the act outlawing local government funding of any pro-gay activity. ... 1988 With Michael Cashman at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28, the act outlawing local government funding of any pro-gay activity. ... Michael Cashman (right) with Ian McKellen at the Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest of Section 28 in 1988. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio 3 is a radio station operated by the BBC within the United Kingdom. ... Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Armistead Jones Maupin Jr. ...


In 2003, during an appearance on Have I Got News For You, McKellen claimed that when he visited Michael Howard, the Conservative Environment Secretary (the Environment Secretary had the brief for local government at the time), in 1988 to lobby against Section 28, Howard refused to change his position but did ask him to leave an autograph for his children. McKellen agreed, but wrote "Fuck off, I'm gay."[20] Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabinet position. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ...


The amendment in question, Section 28 of the Local Government Bill, proposed to prohibit local authorities from "promoting homosexuality" 'as a kind of pretended family relationship'. The drafting was open to several interpretations and the actual impact of the amendment was uncertain. McKellen became active in fighting the proposed law, and declared himself gay on a BBC Radio programme where he debated the subject of Section 28 with the conservative journalist Peregrine Worsthorne. He has said of this period: "My own participating in that campaign was a focus for people [to] take comfort that if Ian McKellen was on board for this, perhaps it would be all right for other people to be as well, gay and straight".[5] Section 28 was, however, enacted and remained on the statute books until 2003. In the intervening period McKellen continued to fight for its repeal and criticised British Prime Minister Tony Blair for failing to concern himself with the issue. Sir Ian McKellen with Michael Cashman at the 1988 Gay Rights March on Manchester in protest against Section 28. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... Sir Peregrine Gerard Worsthorne (born December 22, 1923) is a British Conservative journalist, writer and broadcaster. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


McKellen has continued to be very active in LGBT rights efforts. He is a co-founder of Stonewall, a LGBT rights lobby group in the United Kingdom, named after the Stonewall riots. McKellen is also Patron of LGBT History Month, GAY-GLOS and The Lesbian & Gay Foundation. LGBT social movements is a collective term for a number of movements that share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality and/or gender variance. ... 1988 Sir Ian McKellen and Michael Cashman of Stonewall. ... A lobby can be: An entryway or waiting area, such as a foyer, from the Latin word lobium, or vestibule. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between New York City police officers and groups of gay and transgender people that began during the early... LGBT History Month occurs during February in the United Kingdom, but during October in the United States. ...


In 1994, at the closing ceremony of the Gay Games, he briefly took the stage to address the crowd, saying, "I'm Sir Ian McKellen, but you can call me Serena." (This nickname, originally given to him by Stephen Fry, had been circulating within the gay community since McKellen's knighthood was conferred.)[5] In 2002, he attended the Academy Awards with his then-boyfriend, New Zealander Nick Cuthell - possibly a first for a major nominee since Nigel Hawthorne, the first openly gay performer to be nominated for an Academy Award, who attended the ceremonies with his partner, Trevor Bentham, in 1995. The Federation of Gay Games logo The Gay Games is the worlds largest sporting and cultural event organized by LGBT athletes, artists, musicians, and others. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... Sir Nigel Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was a renowned English actor. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Trevor Bentham (born in England in 1943) is a former stage manager and screenwriter. ...


In 2006, McKellen spoke at the pre-launch of the 2007 LGBT History Month in the UK, lending his support to the organisation and its founder, Sue Sanders, a personal friend. (A video of his speech is available in the external links below.) On 5 January, 2007, McKellen became a patron of The Albert Kennedy Trust, an organisation that provides support to young, homeless and troubled gay, lesbian and transgender people. LGBT History Month occurs during February in the United Kingdom, but during October in the United States. ... Sue Sanders, c. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Albert Kennedy Trust is a voluntary organisation based in England, created in 1989 to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) young people who are homeless,crosseyed, rabid, disfigured, been abducted by aliens, have 11 toes, sing songs from the Elvis Christmas Special Album, living in a hostile environment... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ...


In 2006, Sir Ian became a Patron of Oxford Pride. At the time he said; Front line of Gay Pride parade in Paris, France; June 2005 Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ...

I have been to many Pride occasions across the World, from being Grand Marshall in San Francisco to the first ever gay march in Johannesburg in post-apartheid South Africa. Wherever gay people gather publicly to celebrate their sense of community, there are two important results. First, onlookers can be impressed by our confidence and determination to be ourselves and, second, gay people, of whatever age, can be comforted by the occasion to take first steps towards coming out and leaving the closet forever behind. I send my love to all member of Oxford Pride, their sponsors and supporters, of which I am proud to be one.

This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Gay Parade is the third album released by the band of Montreal. ... This article is about the city in South Africa. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... For the small enclosed storage space, also known as a cupboard, see closet. ...

Awards

What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Playbill, 1981 For other uses, see Amadeus (disambiguation). ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... Wild Honey is an album released by The Beach Boys in 1967. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... Venturia at the Feet of Coriolanus by Gaspare Landi Photo courtesy of The VRoma Project. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... Othello and Desdemona in Venice by Théodore Chassériau (1819–1856) Othello: The Moor of Venice is a tragedy by William Shakespeare written around 1603. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... The European Movie Awards are the most prestigious paneuropean movie awards. ... Richard III may refer to: King Richard III of England Richard III, a play by William Shakespeare about the king Richard III may also refer to motion pictures based on the Shakespeare play: Richard III, 1995 (UK/USA), starring Ian McKellen Richard III, 1986 (Soviet Union) Richard III, 1980 (France... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Back Stage West Garland Awards, also referred to simply as the Garland Awards, are bestowed by the Back Stage West newspaper, honoring excellence in Southern California theatre. ... In performing arts and entertainment, a One Man Show or Solo Show is frequently performed by, but not limited to, stand-up comedians. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ... Gods and Monsters is a 1998 film which recounts the (somewhat fictionalized) last days of the life of troubled film director James Whale, whose homosexuality is a central theme. ... Founded in 1984, the Independent Spirit Awards were originally known as the FINDIE (Friends of Independents) Awards and presented winners with Plexiglas pyramids containing suspended shoestrings representing the paltry budgets of independent films. ... Gods and Monsters is a 1998 film which recounts the (somewhat fictionalized) last days of the life of troubled film director James Whale, whose homosexuality is a central theme. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Annie Awards are given to an animation award show created by the International Animated Film Society ASIFA-Hollywood, and are animations highest honor[1]. Originally designed to celebrate lifetime or career contributions to animation in the fields of producing, directing, animation, design, writing, voice acting, sound and sound... Flushed Away is a computer animated British film directed by David Bowers and Sam Fell. ... The Independents old (pre-compact) masthead. ...

Selected stage and screen credits

Theatre

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre is a building complex and theatre company located on the South Bank in London, England immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... Chichester Festival Theatre is one of the UKs flagship theatres with an international reputation for creating magical live performances. ... The Promise is a play written in 1965 by Russian playwright Aleksei Nicolaevich Arbuzov. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Edward II is an Elizabethan play written by Christopher Marlowe. ... There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus is a play by Christopher Marlowe, based on the Faust story (Faustus is Latin for Faust), in which a man sells his soul to the devil for power and knowledge. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... The Life and Death of King John is one of the Shakespearean histories, plays written by William Shakespeare and based on the history of England. ... For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Florizel and Perdita by Charles Robert Leslie. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... The Young Vic is a theatre in the South Bank area of central London, which specialises in giving opportunities to young actors and directors. ... David Garrick as Abel Drugger in Jonsons The Alchemist by Johann Zoffany. ... This article is about a play. ... Barbican Arts Centre and lakeside terrace Interior - concert hall foyer; library and gallery above The Barbican Arts Centre is an arts venue at the eastern edge of the Barbican Estate in the City of London, England. ... Chekhov in a 1905 illustration. ... The term bent may refer to: Look up bent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Playbill, 1981 For other uses, see Amadeus (disambiguation). ... Venturia at the Feet of Coriolanus by Gaspare Landi Photo courtesy of The VRoma Project. ... Wild Honey is an album released by The Beach Boys in 1967. ... Bust of Anton Chekhov at Badenweiler, Germany The Cherry Orchard (Вишнëвый сад or Vishniovy sad in Russian) is Russian playwright Anton Chekhovs last play. ... The Duchess of Malfi is a macabre, tragic play, written by the English dramatist John Webster and first performed in 1614 [1] at the Globe Theatre in London, and published for the first time in 1623. ... The Real Inspector Hound is a short play by Tom Stoppard. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... Anton Chekhov (left) and Maxim Gorky in Yalta. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ... The original frontpage of Henrik Ibsens En folkefiende, 1882. ... Ahmanson Theatre The Ahmanson Theatre is one of the four main venues that comprise the Los Angeles Music Center. ... Present Laughter is a comedic play written by Noel Coward and first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with his lower middle-class domestic drama This Happy Breed; in 1941 the double bill was expanded to include Cowards new play Blithe Spirit. ... Since opening in March 1990, West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds has established a reputation both nationally and internationally as one of Britains most exciting producing theatres, winning awards for everything from its productions to its customer service. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Chekhov in an 1898 portrait by Osip Braz. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Анто́н Па́влович Че́хов) (born January 29, 1860 (Jan. ... The New London Theatre is a theatre located on the corners of Drury Lane and Parker Street in the Covent Garden area of London. ... // West End most commonly refers to: West End of London West End theatre West End may also refer to: West End, Queensland in Brisbane West End, Queensland (Townsville) in Townsville West End, Vancouver of Vancouver, British Columbia West End of New Westminster, in British Columbia West End, Winnipeg of Winnipeg... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The New London Theatre is a theatre located on the corners of Drury Lane and Parker Street in the Covent Garden area of London. ... // West End most commonly refers to: West End of London West End theatre West End may also refer to: West End, Queensland in Brisbane West End, Queensland (Townsville) in Townsville West End, Vancouver of Vancouver, British Columbia West End of New Westminster, in British Columbia West End, Winnipeg of Winnipeg...

Filmography

Year Title Role Other notes
1969 The Promise Leonidik
Alfred the Great Roger
A Touch of Love George Matthews
1981 Priest of Love Lawrence
1982 The Scarlet Pimpernel Paul Chauvelin
1983 The Keep Dr. Theodore Cuza
1985 Plenty Sir Andrew Charleson
Zina Kronfeld () ()()
1989 Scandal John Profumo
1993 Six Degrees of Separation Geoffrey Miller
The Ballad of Little Jo Percy Corcoran
Last Action Hero Death
1994 To Die For Quilt Documentary Narrator (voice)
The Shadow Dr. Reinhardt Lane
I'll Do Anything John Earl McAlpine
1995 Restoration Will Gates
Richard III Richard III
Jack and Sarah William
1997 Swept from the Sea Dr. James Kennedy
Bent Uncle Freddie
1998 Apt Pupil Kurt Dussander
Gods and Monsters James Whale Academy Award nominated
2000 X-Men Eric Lensherr / Magneto
Cirque du Soleil: Journey of Man Narrator (voice)
2001 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Gandalf the Grey Academy Award nominated
2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Gandalf the Grey / Gandalf the White
2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Gandalf the White
Emile Emile
X2: X-Men United Eric Lensherr / Magneto
2004 Eighteen Jason Anders
2005 Neverwas Gabriel Finch
Asylum Dr. Peter Cleave
The Magic Roundabout Zebedee (voice)
2006 Displaced (voice)
Flushed Away The Toad (voice)
X-Men: The Last Stand Eric Lensherr / Magneto
The Da Vinci Code Sir Leigh Teabing
2007 Stardust Narrator
The Golden Compass Iorek Byrnison (voice)
2008 King Lear King Lear post-production
The Colossus Cecil Rhodes on hold

The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... Alfred the Great was a 1969 epic film which portrayed Alfred the Greats struggle to rid Wessex of the invading Danes, in the 870s AD. It starred David Hemmings in the title role. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... Priest of Love is a 1981 biographical film about D. H. Lawrence, released by Filmways Pictures. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... The Keep is a 1983 horror film directed by Michael Mann and starring Scott Glenn, Gabriel Byrne, Jürgen Prochnow, and a dubbed Ian McKellen. ... // Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Lea Thompson Rambo: First Blood Part II, starring Sylvester Stallone Rocky IV, starring Sylvester Stallone The Color Purple, starring Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey, Margaret Avery, Rae Dawn Chong, Adolph Caesar Out of Africa, starring Meryl Streep and... Plenty is a 1985 movie starring Meryl Streep, Charles Dance, Tracey Ullman, John Gielgud, Sting, Ian McKellen, Sam Neill and Burt Kwouk. ... Zina, tells a story of a twentieth century Antigone, Zina Bronstein, daughter of Leon Trotsky. ... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Scandal (1989) is a [[[United Kingdom|British]] drama film, a fictionalised account of the Profumo affair. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... For the Battlestar Galactica episode, see Six Degrees of Separation (Battlestar Galactica). ... The Ballad of Little Jo is a 1993 film inspired by the true story of a society woman who tries to escape the stigma of bearing a child out of wedlock by going out West, and living disguised as a man. ... Last Action Hero is a 1993 action comedy directed by John McTiernan. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... To Die For is a UK gay movie directed by Peter Mackenzie Litten in 1994. ... The Shadow is a 1994 motion picture based on the character of the same name created by Walter B. Gibson in 1937. ... Ill Do Anything is a 1994 film, starring Nick Nolte and Albert Brooks. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... Restoration is a 1995 film which tells the story of a young doctor, Robert Merivel, who finds himself in the service of King Charles II of England after having saved the Kings favorite spaniel. ... Richard III is a 1995 film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Richard III, starring Sir Ian McKellen, Annette Bening, Jim Broadbent, Robert Downey Jr. ... This article is about King Richard III of England. ... Jack and Sarah is a 1995 British romantic comedy film written and directed by Tim Sullivan. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... Swept from the Sea is a 1997 movie based on a 1903 story, Amy Foster by Joseph Conrad. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Apt Pupil is a 1998 film, directed by Bryan Singer and starring Ian McKellen and Brad Renfro. ... Gods and Monsters is a 1998 film which recounts the (somewhat fictionalized) last days of the life of troubled film director James Whale, whose homosexuality is a central theme. ... James Whale (July 22, 1889 – May 29, 1957) was a ground-breaking British Hollywood film director, best known for his work in the horror movie genre, making such pictures as Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, and The Invisible Man. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a film, released on Wednesday, December 19, 2001, directed by Peter Jackson with a runtime of 178 minutes (2 hours, 58 minutes). ... Sir Ian McKellen portrays Gandalf in The Two Towers. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... This title can refer to either: The Two Towers (book), the second part of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Movie poster for the 2003 movie of Emile, featuring Ian McKellen. ... This page is about the 2003 movie X2; see X2 (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... Asylum is a 2005 film directed by David Mackenzie. ... The Magic Roundabout (released in North America as Sprung! The Magic Roundabout and, in an amended form, as Doogal) is a film based on the television series of the same name. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... Displaced is an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, the 24th episode of the third season. ... Flushed Away is a computer animated British film directed by David Bowers and Sam Fell. ... This article is about the film. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... For the book, see Stardust (novel). ... The Golden Compass is an Academy Award-winning fantasy film based upon Northern Lights (also known as The Golden Compass), the first novel in Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials, and was released on December 5, 2007 by New Line Cinema. ... Iorek Byrnison is a Panserbjørne (armoured bear) from Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials. ... 2008 in film is expected to feature another battle of the sequels, as many properties release new installments, including: Rambo, Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay, The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, Lost Boys: The Tribe... Leir was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. ... Cecil Rhodes Cecil John Rhodes, PC, DCL, (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902[1]) was a British-born South African businessman, mining magnate, and politician. ...

Television

David Copperfield is a quasi-autobiographical novel by Charles Dickens. ... The family name Keats, a surname of England is believed to be descended originally from the Anglo Saxon race from old English word cyta or cyte which has been used to describe a worker at the shed, outhouse for animals, hence herdsman. ... Keats redirects here. ... Edward II is an Elizabethan play written by Christopher Marlowe. ... Title page of Richard II, from the fifth quarto, published in 1615. ... Actress Cate Blanchett in the title role of Hedda Gabler Hedda Gabler is both a play and a fictional character created by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... For the eponymous flower, see Scarlet pimpernel. ... Walter was drama shown on the first night of Channel 4 television on 2 November 1982. ... And the Band Played On is an Emmy award-winning 1993 television drama film based on the best-selling 1987 non-fiction book And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic. ... 1st US edition cover of the first book in the Tales of the City series This article is about the novel series; see also Tales of the City (novel) and Tales of the City (miniseries) Tales of the City is a series of six books, originally serialized in the San... Tsar Nicholas II (18 May 1868 to 17 July 1918)1 was the last crowned Emperor of Russia. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Hay Street may refer to: Hay Street, Hertfordshire, a village in England Hay Street, Perth, Australia Hay Street, Sydney, Australia Category: ... Not to be confused with Extra (TV series). ...

Miscellaneous

Heart was a song recorded by The Pet Shop Boys which reached #1 on the UK singles chart for three weeks in April 1988. ... Pet Shop Boys are an English dance music duo, consisting of Neil Tennant who provides main vocals, keyboards and occasionally guitar, and Chris Lowe on keyboards and occasionally on vocals. ...

References

  1. ^ (2006) Who's Who. London: A and C Black. ISBN 0713671645. 
  2. ^ London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 52382, pages 1–2, 1990-12-28. Retrieved on 2007-12-10.
  3. ^ London Gazette: no. 52543, page 8208, 1991-05-28. Retrieved on 2007-12-10.
  4. ^ London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 58557, page 4, 2007-12-29. Retrieved on 2007-12-31.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Steele, Bruce C.. "The Knight's Crusade: playing the wizard Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings may make Sir Ian McKellen the world's best-known gay man. And he's armed and ready to carry the fight for equality along with him (Cover Story)", The Advocate, December 11, 2001, pp. 36–38, 40–45. 
  6. ^ Bolton School
  7. ^ Bolton Little Theatre
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Stated in interview on Inside the Actors Studio
  9. ^ "Ian McKellen Biography", Tiscali Film and TV. Retrieved on 2005-04-11. 
  10. ^ "Sir Ian McKellen", The Times, August 27, 2005. Retrieved on 2005-09-10. 
  11. ^ Correspondence with Ian Mcellen—Vegetarianism from "online autobiography", accessed 2008-02-04.
  12. ^ a b c Empire, May 2006
  13. ^ Discover Southwark: Southwark borough council
  14. ^ Theatre Peckham Company Information. Theatre Peckham. Retrieved on 2008-04-02.
  15. ^ The Guardian, 4 June 2007: "brilliant...very notable theatrical milestones." The Sunday Times 10 June 2007: "[one] of the greatest Lears of the past 50 years."
  16. ^ Germaine Greer, So Ian McKellen drops his trousers to play King Lear. That sums up the RSC's whole approach, The Guardian, May 7, 2007
  17. ^ "Masterful McKellen triumphs in tragedy", The Financial Times, June 2, 2007
  18. ^ Philip Pullella, "Boycott Da Vinci Code film", Reuters 28 April 2006. Accessed 20 May 2006.
  19. ^ "Ian McKellen Unable to Suspend Disbelief While Reading the Bible", Us Weekly 17 May 2006. Video clip available here.
  20. ^ 10 things we didn't know this time last week. BBC News. 14 November 2003.
  21. ^ Independent on Sunday Pink List 2007

Whos Who, ISBN 0-713-662-751, is an annual British publication by A & C Black of very short biographies of about 30,000 famous and/or important Britons, published since 1849. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Inside the Actors Studio is the Emmy-nominated, longest-running original series on the Bravo cable television channel, hosted by James Lipton. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Internet Broadway Database The Internet Broadway Database (IBDb) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ... This article or section should be merged with Yahoo! Yahoo! Movies provides information on current movie theater releases, including showtimes, critical reviews and general popular opinion. ...

Interviews, blogs and clips

Awards
Preceded by
John Rubinstein
for Children of a Lesser God
Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play
1980-1981
for Amadeus
Succeeded by
Christopher Plummer
for Othello
Preceded by
Oliver Ford Davies
for Racing Demon
Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor
1991
for Richard III
Succeeded by
Nigel Hawthorne
for The Madness of George III
Preceded by
Donald Sutherland
for Citizen X
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television
1997
for Rasputin
Succeeded by
George C. Scott
for 12 Angry Men
Preceded by
Albert Finney
for Erin Brockovich
Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
2001
for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Succeeded by
Christopher Walken
for Catch Me if You Can
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Ian McKellen - MSN Encarta (497 words)
Ian McKellen, born in 1939, English actor with a gift for portraying inner turmoil.
Ian Murray McKellen was born in Burnley, a mill town in northern England, and he attended Cambridge University.
McKellen became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1974.
Ian McKellen Picture, Profile, Gossip, and News at CelebrityWonder.com (507 words)
In 1979, McKellen created the role of Max, a gay man who pretends to be Jewish when he is shipped to a concentration camp, in BENT.
McKellen has confessed he was offered the coveted role of Professor Dumbledore in the Harry Potter films before Richard Harris died -- the acclaimed thespian has not confirmed or denied whether he has been approached again or if he wants to take over the part.
McKellen has been tipped to replace the late Richard Harris in the third Harry Potter movie.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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