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Encyclopedia > Ian McEwan
Ian McEwan, CBE
Born: June 21, 1948
Aldershot
Occupation: Author, screenwriter
Nationality: British
Writing period: 1975 - present
Genres: Recent history
Debut works: First Love, Last Rites
Website: http://www.ianmcewan.com

Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Aldershot is a town in the English county of Hampshire, located on heathland approximately 55 km (35 miles) southwest of London. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Cover of First Love, Last Rites First Love, Last Rites is a collection of short stories by Ian McEwan. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ...

Contents

Biography

McEwan was born in Aldershot in England and spent much of his childhood in East Asia, Germany and North Africa, where his army officer father was posted. He was educated at the University of Sussex and the University of East Anglia, where he was the first graduate of Malcolm Bradbury's pioneering creative writing course. Aldershot is a town in the English county of Hampshire, located on heathland approximately 55 km (35 miles) southwest of London. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Geographic East Asia. ... North Africa is the Mediterranean, northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The University of Sussex (also known colloquially as Sussex Uni) is an English campus university which is situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, and is four miles from Brighton. ... The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a leading campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Governments New Universities programme in the 1960s. ... Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ...


He has been married twice. His second wife, Annalena McAfee, is the editor of The Guardian's Review section. In 1999, his first wife, Penny Allen, absconded with McEwan's 13-year-old son after a court in Brittany, France, ruled that the boy should be returned to his father, who had been granted sole custody over him and his 15-year-old brother.[1] Annalena McAfee is a British writer, journalist and editor of The Guardians literary supplement, the Guardian Review. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


In March and April 2004, just months after the British government invited him to dinner with American First Lady Laura Bush, McEwan was denied entry into the United States by the Department of Homeland Security for not having the proper visa.[2] After several days publicity in the British press, McEwan was admitted because, as he quoted a customs official telling him, "We still don't want to let you in, but this is attracting a lot of unfavourable publicity."[3] The US government later sent a letter of apology.[4] First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies, from left, Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States of America George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), commonly known in the US as Homeland Security, is a Cabinet department of the Federal Government of the United States with the responsibility of protecting the territory of the United States from terrorist attacks and responding to natural disasters. ...


He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was awarded the Shakespeare Prize by the Alfred Toepfer Foundation, Hamburg, in 1999. Ian McEwan is also a Distinguished Supporter of the British Humanist Association. He was awarded a CBE in 2000.[5] The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. External link The Royal Society of Literature Categories: Literature stubs | Literature of the United Kingdom ... The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a British multi-disciplinary institution, based in London. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The British Humanist Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes Humanism. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander...


In 2002, Ian McEwan discovered that he had a brother who had been given up for adoption during World War II - the story became public in 2007.[6] The brother, a bricklayer named David Sharpe, was born six years earlier than McEwan, when his mother was married to a different man. Sharpe has the same two parents as McEwan but was born from an affair between McEwan's parents that occurred before their marriage. After her first husband was killed in combat, McEwan's mother married her lover, and Ian was born a few years later.[7] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Works

His first published work was a collection of short stories, First Love, Last Rites (1975), which won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1976. The Cement Garden (1978) and The Comfort of Strangers (1981) were his two earliest novels. The nature of these works caused him to be nicknamed "Ian Macabre" .[8] These were followed by three novels of some success in the 1980s and early 1990s. Cover of First Love, Last Rites First Love, Last Rites is a collection of short stories by Ian McEwan. ... The Somerset Maugham Award is a British literary prize given each May by the Society of Authors. ... The Cement Garden is a 1978 novel by Ian McEwan. ... The Comfort of Strangers is a 1990 film directed by Paul Schrader. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ...


His 1997 novel, Enduring Love, about a person with de Clerambault's syndrome, is regarded by many as a masterpiece, though it was not shortlisted for the Booker Prize.[9][10] In 1998, he was awarded the Booker Prize for his novel Amsterdam. His next novel, Atonement, received considerable high acclaim; Time Magazine named it the best novel of 2002, and it was short-listed for the Booker Prize. His next work, Saturday, follows an especially eventful day in the life of a successful neurosurgeon. Henry Perowne, the main character, lives in a house on a well known square in central London, where McEwan now lives after having relocated from Oxford. Saturday won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for 2005. Enduring Love (1997) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ... Erotomania is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that another person, usually of a higher social status, is in love with them. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... Amsterdam book cover Amsterdam (1998) is a novel by Ian McEwan, winner of the 1998 Booker Prize. ... Atonement (2001) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The British hardcover edition, with the BT Tower in the background Saturday (2005) is a novel by the British author Ian McEwan that charts the day of a 48 year old London neurosurgeon called Henry Perowne. ... Insertion of an electrode during neurosurgery for Parkinsons disease. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book awards in Britain. ...


McEwan has also written a number of produced screenplays, a stage play, children's fiction, and an oratorio. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ...


Controversy

In late 2006, Lucilla Andrews' autobiography No Time for Romance became the focus of a posthumous controversy when it was alleged that McEwan plagiarized from this work while writing his highly acclaimed novel Atonement.[8][11] McEwan publicly protested his innocence; in The Guardian newspaper, he responded to the claim, stating he had acknowledged Andrews' work in the author's note at the end of Atonement.[12][13] McEwan has been defended by many leading writers, including the American novelist Thomas Pynchon.[8] Lucilla Andrews (21 November 1919, Suez - 3 October 2006, Edinburgh) was a British romantic novelist. ... Atonement (2001) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ...


Bibliography

Novels

Short fiction collections The Cement Garden is a 1978 novel by Ian McEwan. ... The Comfort of Strangers is a 1990 film directed by Paul Schrader. ... the child in time ... The Innocent is a 1989 novel by British writer Ian McEwan, also written as a screenplay. ... Black Dogs is a 1992 novel by the Booker Prize-winning British author Ian McEwan. ... Enduring Love (1997) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ... Amsterdam book cover Amsterdam (1998) is a novel by Ian McEwan, winner of the 1998 Booker Prize. ... Atonement (2001) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ... The British hardcover edition, with the BT Tower in the background Saturday (2005) is a novel by the British author Ian McEwan that charts the day of a 48 year old London neurosurgeon called Henry Perowne. ... On Chesil Beach is a 2007 novel by British writer Ian McEwan. ...

Childrens' fiction Cover of First Love, Last Rites First Love, Last Rites is a collection of short stories by Ian McEwan. ... In Between the Sheets (1978) is a collection of short stories by Ian McEwan. ...

  • Rose Blanche (1985)
  • The Daydreamer (1994)

Plays

  • The Imitation Game (1981)

Screenplays

Oratorio Richard Eyre directed The Ploughmans Lunch, a 1983 issues film whose subtext, according to the BFI, is the way countries and people re-write their own history to suit the needs of the present; the films title is a metaphor for the rewriting said to have occurred in... The Good Son is a 1993 thriller film directed by Joseph Ruben and written by Ian McEwan. ...

  • or Shall We Die? (1983)

Film Adaptations

The Comfort of Strangers is a 1990 film directed by Paul Schrader. ... Enduring Love is a 2004 British film directed by Roger Michell with screenwriter Joe Penhall, based on a British novel by Ian McEwan. ...

External links

Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ... The Hour is a Canadian television newsmagazine broadcast on CBC Television. ... George Paul Stroumboulopoulos (born August 16, 1972 in Malton, now part of the City of Mississauga, Ontario), commonly nicknamed Strombo, is a Canadian television and radio personality. ...

Further reading

  • Rooney, Anne (2006), Atonement, York Notes. ISBN 1-405-83561-3.
  • Malcolm, David (2002), Understanding Ian McEwan, University of South Carolina. ISBN 1-57003-436-2.
  • Reynolds, Margaret & Noakes, Jonathan (2002), Ian McEwan: The Essential Guide, Vintage. ISBN 0-09-943755-4.
  • Slay Jr., Jack (1996), Ian McEwan (Twayne's English Authors Series)), Twayne Publishers. ISBN 0-8057-4578-5.
  • Childs, Peter (2005), The Fiction of Ian McEwan (Readers' Guides to Essential Criticism), Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 1-4039-1909-7.
  • Ryan, Kiernan (1994), Ian McEwan (Writers and Their Work), Northcote House. ISBN 0-7463-0742-X.
  • Byrnes, C. (2002), The Work of Ian McEwan: A Psychodynamic Approach, Pauper Press. ISBN 0-946650-75-6.
  • Byrnes, Christina (1995), Sex and Sexuality in Ian McEwan's Work, Paupers' Press.
  • D'Eliva, Gaetano & Williams, Christopher (1986), La Nuova Letteratura Inglese Ian McEwan, Schena Editore.
  • Pedot, Richard (1999), Perversions Textuelles dans la Fiction d'Ian McEwan, Editions l'Harmattan.
  • Williams, Christopher (1993), Ian McEwan's The Cement Garden and the Tradition of the Child/Adolescent as 'I-NarratorPDF (209 KiB), Biblioteca della Ricerca, Schena Editore.

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the file format created by Adobe Systems, in 1993, for document exchange. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

References

  1. ^ "Novelist's ex-wife 'gagged'", BBC News, 1999-09-07. Retrieved on 2006-06-03. 
  2. ^ Gillan, Audrey. "Novelist McEwan barred from US", Guardian Unlimited, 2004-04-01. Retrieved on 2006-06-03. 
  3. ^ Harden, Blaine. "Acclaimed novelist denied entry to U.S.", San Francisco Chronicle, 2004-04-03. Retrieved on 2006-06-03. 
  4. ^ "US apologises for barring author", BBC News, 2004-04-22. Retrieved on 2006-06-03. 
  5. ^ Ian McEwan. Contemporary Writers. British Council. Retrieved on 2006-06-03.
  6. ^ Cowell, Alan. "Ian McEwan's life takes twist with discovery of a brother", International Herald Tribune, 2007-01-17. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  7. ^ "Novelist McEwan discovers brother", BBC News, 2007-01-11. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  8. ^ a b c Walsh, John. "Ian McEwan: Here's the twist", Independent Online Edition, 2007-01-27. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  9. ^ Knorr, Katherine. "Enduring Love", International Herald Tribune, 1997-10-09. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  10. ^ Ian McEwan's Family Values. Boston Review. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  11. ^ Langdon, Julia. "Ian McEwan accused of stealing ideas from romance novelist", Daily Mail, Associated Newspapers Ltd., 2006-11-25. Retrieved on 2006-12-14. 
  12. ^ McEwan, Ian. "An inspiration, yes. Did I copy from another author? No", Guardian Unlimited, 2006-11-27. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  13. ^ Hoyle, Ben. "McEwan hits back at call for atonement", Times Online, Times Newspapers Ltd., 2006-11-27. Retrieved on 2006-11-27. 


Persondata
NAME McEwan, Ian
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Author
DATE OF BIRTH June 21, 1948
PLACE OF BIRTH Aldershot, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
McEwan, Ian | Authors | Guardian Unlimited Books (370 words)
McEwan wrote the unsuccessful film The Good Son (Joseph Ruben, 1993), about a sociopathic child, intended to reverse Macaulay Culkin's goody-goody image.
McEwan now describes the precociously macabre nature of his first short-story collections as "a sort of willed extravagance", a reaction to the class-bound social writers of the time.
Natasha Walter applauds Ian McEwan's subtle tale of a wedding night on the eve of the sexual revolution, On Chesil Beach.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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