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Encyclopedia > Ian MacDonald

Ian MacCormick (October 3, 1948August 20, 2003), who wrote under the pseudonym Ian MacDonald, was a British music critic and author, best known for his detailed history of The Beatles. October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A pseudonym (Greek: false name) is a fictitious name used by an individual as an alternative to his or her legal name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Music journalism. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ...

Contents

Early life and work

Ian MacCormick's brother, Bill MacCormick, played bass in Robert Wyatt's Matching Mole. He briefly attended King's College, Cambridge, at first studying English, but soon transfering to Archeology and Anthropology. He dropped out after a year. While at Cambridge he was vaguely acquainted with cult singer/songwriter Nick Drake. Bill MacCormick (born 1951 in London, UK) is a british bassist and vocalist who was a member of the bands Quiet Sun (with Phil Manzanera, Ian MacCormick aka Ian MacDonald et al. ... // Robert Wyatt, born Robert Ellidge, in Bristol on 28 January 1945, is an English musician, and a former member of the influential Canterbury scene band Soft Machine. ... -1... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Provost Prof. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Nicholas Rodney Drake (June 19, 1948 – November 25, 1974) was an English singer/songwriter and musician best known for his solo acoustic, autumnal songs. ...


Primarily a writer with interest in many kinds of music, he was Assistant Editor of the NME from 1972 to 1975. He began a songwriting collaboration as a lyricist with his brother's band Quiet Sun including future Roxy Music guitarist Phil Manzanera. This collaboration was resumed in the late 1970s when MacDonald provided lyrics for the album Listen Now. Later, Brian Eno would help MacDonald produce Sub Rosa, an album of his own songs, and release it on Manzanera's record label. For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Quiet Sun was a UK Canterbury Scene band consisting of Phil Manzanera (guitars), Bill MacCormick (bass), Dave Jarrett (keyboards) and Charles Hayward (drums). ... Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Phil Manzanera (born 31 January 1951 in London, England, UK as Philip Targett-Adams, educated at Dulwich College), played guitar with Quiet Sun, then Roxy Music. ... Brian Peter George St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In his book Revolution In The Head, first published in 1994, MacDonald carefully anatomised every record The Beatles made, drawing attention to broad themes, particular examples of inspiration and moments of human frailty alike. The book also includes his essay "Fabled Foursome, Disappearing Decade", an analysis of the social and cultural changes of the 1960s and their aftereffects. The book took a song-by-song approach. It was edited into 'The Beatles' No. 1 Hits' in 2002. The edit featured a new, shorter introduction, and only featured the essays on the songs on The Beatles' chart-topping album, 'One'. For several other people with similarly spelled names, see Ian McDonald. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


MacDonald wrote widely on classical music. His The New Shostakovich was one of the most talked-about classical books of the 1990s. It was the first western book that attempted to put the works of the great Russian composer in their political and social context. MacDonald's insistence on creating a cinematic scenario for every major piece — inevitably a bitter satire on Soviet brutality and Stalinism — polarised opinion sharply. Some rated his interpretations fanciful and musicologically worthless, while others believed they held some subjective truth. MacDonald was a regular reviewer for the UK magazine Classic CD, and was known for his passionate and opinionated views on twentieth-century music.


Later life and death

The success of Revolution In The Head motivated him to resume popular music writing and he began contributing to Mojo and Uncut music magazines. The People's Music, an anthology of these writings, was published in July 2003 just weeks before his death. He had been working on a book entitled: Birds, Beasts & Fishes: A Guide to Animal Lore and Symbolism. He was also working on a book about David Bowie, an artist whom MacDonald had written an essay about before, which is in 'The People's Music'. Neither of these books have been published. Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... Special Issue Example Queen UNCUT magazine is a popular monthly publication based in London, which is available across the English speaking world, and focuses on films, music and books. ...


In August 2003, MacDonald committed suicide following a lengthy period of clinical depression. Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... Clinical depression (also called severe depressive disorder, major depressive disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ...


Trivia

The track "Wish You Well" on Phil Manzanera's album 6PM is a tribute to MacDonald. Phil Manzanera (born 31 January 1951 in London, England, UK as Philip Targett-Adams, educated at Dulwich College), played guitar with Quiet Sun, then Roxy Music. ...


Publications

  • Revolution in the Head - The Beatles' Records and the Sixties – ISBN 1-84413-828-3
  • The New Shostakovich (1990) – ISBN 0-19-284026-6 ; reprinted & updated (2006)
  • The People's Music (2003)

External links


 
 

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