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Encyclopedia > Ian Hislop
Ian Hislop

Hislop on the set of Have I Got News for You singing a Jimmy Somerville song
Born: 13 July 1960 (1960-07-13) (age 47)
Mumbles, Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom
Occupation: Satirical comedian, Editor

Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. Image File history File links Hignfy21. ... Jimmy Somerville – concert in Warsaw, 2006. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mumbles village, Wales Mumbles (otherwise The Mumbles – Welsh Y Mwmbwls) is an extremely large village and adjacent headland stretching into Swansea Bay. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... A managing editor is a senior member of a publications management team. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Highlights The so-called iTunes Law, which Apple has called state-sponsored piracy, is approved by the French Parliament (coat of arms pictured). ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions and a flagship programme for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... This list is poorly defined, permanently incomplete, or has become unverifiable or an indiscriminate list or repository of loosely associated topics. ...

Contents

Early life

Hislop was born in Mumbles, Swansea in Wales, to a Scottish father and a Channel Islander mother. When he was five months old, his family began to travel around the world in accordance with his father's job. During his infant years, Hislop lived in Nigeria, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Hong Kong. On his return to the United Kingdom, Hislop was educated at Ardingly College, an independent boarding school, where he started his satirical career, directing and appearing in revues, and also becoming Head Prefect. He then attended Magdalen College, Oxford, where he graduated with a degree in English literature in 1981. Mumbles village, Wales Mumbles (otherwise The Mumbles – Welsh Y Mwmbwls) is an extremely large village and adjacent headland stretching into Swansea Bay. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Ardingly College is a public (privately funded and independent) co-educational boarding and day school, founded in 1858 by Canon Nathaniel Woodard. ... A revue is a theatrical entertainment based around music with dancing and sketches or skits either on contemporary news or the venue or base of the theatre company concerned, such as college or medical school. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


At Oxford he founded and edited the magazine Passing Wind, in which he interviewed Richard Ingrams, who was then editor of Private Eye. He joined the latter immediately after leaving Oxford, and became editor in 1986 upon Ingrams' departure. It was revealed in an interview with The Independent that this was despite opposition from Eye hacks Peter McKay and Nigel Dempster, with the former taking the magazine's majority shareholder, Peter Cook, out for lunch in an attempt to dissuade him from appointing Hislop. However, Cook pressed on, and his new editor sacked both McKay and Dempster from the magazine without hesitation. Richard Ingrams (born August 19, 1937) was the second editor of British satirical magazine, Private Eye, taking over from Christopher Booker in 1963. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... Nigel Richard Patton Dempster (1 November 1941 in Calcutta, India – 12 July 2007 in Ham, Surrey) was a British journalist, author, broadcaster and diarist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Private Eye

As editor of Private Eye, Ian Hislop was once the most sued man in English legal history[1]. (He has since lost this title to various celebrities who, according to him, "sue for privacy".)[2] The most famous libel case involving Hislop and Private Eye was brought by the publishing magnate Robert Maxwell. After the case he quipped: "I've just given a fat cheque to a fat Czech". Ordered to pay £600,000 in damages after being sued for libel by Sonia Sutcliffe, wife of the Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe, Hislop told reporters waiting outside the High Court, "If that was justice then I'm a banana."[3] However, the award was dropped to £60,000 on appeal, and the magazine's attacks on Maxwell were fully vindicated by the revelations of massive fraud that followed his death. In his many court cases, Hislop has won only once.[4] Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and formerly Member of Parliament (MP), who rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing empire. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Hislop continues to be applauded for his wit and satire. In an interview with Third Way Magazine he said "Satire is the bringing to ridicule of vice, folly and humbug. All the negatives imply a set of positives. Certainly in this country, you only go round saying, ‘That’s wrong, that’s corrupt’ if you have some feeling that it should be better than that. People say, ‘You satirists attack everything.’ Well, we don’t, actually. That’s the whole point."[5] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Have I Got News for You

Hislop is the only person to have appeared in every episode of Have I Got News for You's 17-year history, despite suffering from appendicitis during one episode and having to go to hospital immediately afterwards. His satirical views and broad knowledge of politics complement the wry surrealism of fellow panellist Paul Merton, and this interaction contributes greatly to the success of the show. Hislop often suffixes potentially slanderous statements with "allegedly". This however provides no legal protection[6] and he has joked in the past that he does this to try and trick other panellists less familiar with the law into making deflationary statements[citation needed]. Paul Merton (born Paul Martin 9 July 1957[1]) is an English actor, deadpan comedian and writer, who is best known as a panellist on the BBC TV show Have I Got News for You and Radio 4s Just a Minute, as well as Channel 4s Whose Line...


Apart from one episode, where Hislop and Merton swapped places (and dress styles), he has only ever sat in the far right seat (far left from the audience's point of view).


Other television and radio work

His television debut was on the short lived Channel 4 chat show Loose Talk in 1983, an experience which so traumatised him he included it on his list of most hated items when he first appeared on Room 101. Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... Loose Talk was a chat show broadcast on Channel 4 in 1983. ... This page is about the TV series Room 101. ...


Hislop was also a scriptwriter on the 1980s political satire series Spitting Image, in which puppets were used to depict well-known figures, mostly politicians. He even had a puppet of himself which appeared as a background character in certain sketches. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ...


Hislop, along with Nick Newman, wrote the BBC Radio 4 series Gush, a satire based on the first Gulf War, in the style of Jeffrey Archer. With Newman, he also wrote the family-friendly satirical sitcom My Dad's the Prime Minister. Nick Newman is a topical cartoonist for the British satirical magazine, Private Eye. ... BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Combatants United States Saudi Arabia Egypt United Kingdom & US-led Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Khalid bin Sultan Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 240 killed in action, 776 wounded, 30 taken prisoner At least 183,000 victims of the Gulf War syndrome Est. ... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is a British best-selling author and politician. ... My Dads the Prime Minister is a British sitcom written by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman. ...


Hislop has also presented serious TV programmes. These include School Rules, a three-part Channel 4 study on the history of British education; an edition of the BBC's Who Do You Think You Are?, in which he attempted to trace his genealogy and Not Forgotten, a four-part series on Channel 4 detailing the lives of numerous individuals lost in the First World War. A further programme 'Not Forgotten: Shot at Dawn' offering an insight into British First World War soldiers executed for offences such as cowardice and desertion aired in January 2007. He also presented one episode of the BBC's Great Railway Journeys, in which he travelled across India. “TV” redirects here. ... Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Who Do You Think You Are? was a ten part television series shown on the UKs BBC2, in 2004, in which various celebrities go on a journey, in order to try and trace their family tree. ... Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Recently, he has also written and presented factual programmes for Radio 4 about such subjects as tax rebellions, female hymn composers, scouting and patron saints of the British Isles. Scouting, also known as the Scout Movement, is a worldwide youth movement with the stated aim of supporting young people in their physical, mental and spiritual development, so that they may play constructive roles in society. ... The British Isles in relation to mainland Europe The British Isles (French: , Irish: [1] or Oileáin Iarthair Eorpa,[2] Manx: Ellanyn Goaldagh, Scottish Gaelic: , Welsh: ), are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ...


In 2007 he became the only person to go on the BBC show Room 101 twice.


He has also been a comedy scriptwriter for Harry Enfield (providing the Tim Nice-but-Dim character). This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 2003, he was listed in The Observer as one of the 50 funniest acts in British comedy.[7] Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


He has also appeared in (at least) two episodes of Question Time. In one he made an open attack on Jeffrey Archer, who had been imprisoned for perjury, when his wife, Mary Archer, was a fellow panellist. She was noticeably angry that the issue had been raised and criticised Hislop after the recording had finished. Question Time is a topical debate television programme in the United Kingdom, based on Any Questions?. It is currently shown on BBC One at 22:35 on Thursdays, and typically features politicians from the three major political parties and other public figures who answer questions put to them by the... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is a British best-selling author and politician. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... Mary Doreen Archer, Baroness Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born Mary Doreen Weeden,on 22nd December 1944) is a British scientist specialising in solar power conversion. ...


Personal life

Ian is married to bestselling novelist Victoria Hislop, author of The Island. The couple have been married since 16 April 1988, and have two teenage children. They live in Sissinghurst, Kent. Victoria Hislop is a British author. ... Victoria Hislop is a British author. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...


Religious Views

In Caroline Chartres's book "Why I am still an Anglican", Hislop describes himself as, "Atheist with Doubts: a C of E don't know". In 1996 he presented an award-winning documentary series for BBC Channel 4 about the history of the Church of England called "Canterbury Tales". Recent works include the Radio 4 series, "The Real Patron Saints".


References

  1. ^ Byrne, Ciar. "Ian Hislop: My 20 years at the Eye", The Independent, 2006-10-23. Retrieved on 2006-10-23. 
  2. ^ "60 Seconds: Ian Hislop", Metro (Associated Metro Limited), 2006-12-06. Retrieved on 2006-12-06. 
  3. ^ "On this day 24 May 1989: Yorkshire Ripper's wife wins damages", BBC News. Retrieved on 2006-10-23. 
  4. ^ "60 Seconds: Ian Hislop", Metro (Associated Metro Limited), 2006-12-06. Retrieved on 2006-12-06. 
  5. ^ Third Way: interview (16 January 1995)
  6. ^ BBC News: Only joking — When having a laugh ends up in court
  7. ^ "The A-Z of laughter (part one)", The Observer, 2003-12-07. Retrieved on 2006-12-17. 

The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover for an issue of the Metro newspaper, October 25th 2004. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover for an issue of the Metro newspaper, October 25th 2004. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Ian Hislop at the Internet Movie Database
  • Ian Hislop interview (Evening Standard)
  • "There's no place like Gnome", profile by Nick Greenslade, The Observer, 22 October 2006
  • [1], interview by Ciar Byrne for the The Independent celebrating his 20th year as editor of Private Eye.
Media offices
Preceded by
Richard Ingrams
Editor of Private Eye
1986 - present
Succeeded by
Incumbent


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Richard Ingrams (born August 19, 1937) was the second editor of British satirical magazine, Private Eye, taking over from Christopher Booker in 1963. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...

Have I Got News for You
Ian Hislop | Paul Merton
Angus Deayton | Guest presenters
Episodes | The London Studios

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ian Hislop (181 words)
Ian Hislop (born July 13, 1960) is the editor of British satrical magazine Private Eye.
During Hislop's tenure Private Eye was sued for libel by corrupt publishing magnate Robert Maxwell.
Hislop is also a media pundit and a panellist on the popular current affairs[?] and satire program Have I Got News For You.
Ian Hislop at AllExperts (675 words)
Ian Hislop (born July 13, 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter.
Hislop was born in Mumbles, South Wales to a Scottish father and an English mother.
Ian is married to bestselling novelist Victoria Hislop, author of The Island.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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