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Encyclopedia > Ian Hacking

Ian Hacking, CC (born 1936 in Vancouver) is a philosopher, specializing in the philosophy of science. He has undergraduate degrees from the University of British Columbia (1956) and the University of Cambridge (1958), where he was a student at Peterhouse College, Cambridge. Hacking also took his Ph.D. at Cambridge (1962), under the direction of Casimir Lewy, a former student of Wittgenstein's. After teaching for several years at Stanford University, he joined the University of Toronto in 1982, was made a University Professor there in 1991 (he is now a professor emeritus). In 2001 he was appointed to the Chair of Philosophy and of the History of Scientific Concepts at the Collège de France. Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Philosophy of science studies the philosophical assumptions, foundations, and implications of science, including the formal sciences, natural sciences, and social sciences. ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a public university with its main campus located at Point Grey, in the University Endowment Lands adjacent to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and another smaller campus known as UBC Okanagan located in Kelowna, British Columbia. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peters Church (now little St Marys Church) Previous names - Established 1284 Sister College Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyron Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 271 Graduates 128 Homepage Boatclub Peterhouse is the oldest college in the University of Cambridge. ... Casimir Lewy (Warsaw1919-1991) was a Polish-born British philosopher. ... Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), pictured here in 1930, made influential contributions to Logic and the philosophy of language, critically examining the task of conventional philosophy and its relation to the nature of language. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a coeducational public research university in Toronto, Ontario. ... A professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) (or prof for short) is a senior teacher, lecturer and/or researcher usually employed by a college or university. ... Courtyard of the Collège de France. ...


Hacking is known for bringing a historical approach to the philosophy of science and was one of the important members of the "Stanford School" in philosophy of science, a group that also included John Dupre, Nancy Cartwright, and Peter Galison. Despite his strong interest in historical revolutions in science (following the work of Thomas Kuhn), Hacking defends a realism about science, "entity realism", albeit only on pragmatic grounds: the electron is real because human beings use it to make things happen. This form of realism encourages a realistic stance towards the entities postulated by mature sciences but skepticism towards scientific laws. In his later work (from 1990 onward), his focus has shifted from the physical sciences to psychology, partly under the influence of the work of Michel Foucault. Foucault was an influence as early as The Emergence of Probability (1975), in which Hacking proposed that the modern schism between subjective or personalist probablity, and the long-run frequency interpretation, emerged in the early modern era as an epistemological "break" involving two incompatible models of uncertainty and chance. Foucault's approach to knowledge systems and power is also reflected in Hacking's work on the social construction of psychiatric disorders and institutional roles for statistical reasoning in the 19th century. Nancy Cartwright (born 1943) is a professor of philosophy at the London School of Economics and the University of California at San Diego. ... Peter Galison is a professor of physics and the history of science at Harvard University. ... Thomas Samuel Kuhn (July 18, 1922 – June 17, 1996) was an American intellectual who wrote extensively on the history of science and developed several important notions in the philosophy of science. ... Entity realism is a philosophical position within the debate about scientific realism. ... Michel Foucault (IPA pronunciation: ; English-speakers pronunciation varies) (October 15, 1926 – June 25, 1984) was a French philosopher and historian. ...


In 2002, he was awarded the first Killam Prize for the Humanities, Canada's most distinguished award for outstanding career achievements. In 2004, he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada. From the Killam Prize website: // Paul Corkum, National Research Council of Canada, natural sciences Jean-Marie Dufour, Université de Montréal, social sciences B. Brett Finlay, University of British Columbia, health sciences Roderick I.L. Guthrie, McGill University, engineering Susan Sherwin, Dalhousie University, humanities Luc Devroye, McGill University, engineering Brian... Seal of the Order of Canada The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, with membership awarded to those who exemplify the Orders Latin motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam, which means (those) desiring a better country. ...


Selected works

Hacking's works have been translated into several languages.

  • The Logic of Statistical Inference (1965)
  • The Emergence of Probability (1975)
  • Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? (1975)
  • Representing and Intervening (1983)
  • The Taming of Chance (1990)
  • Scientific Revolutions (1990)
  • Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory (1995)
  • Mad Travellers: Reflections on the Reality of Transient Mental Illness (1998)
  • The Social Construction of What? (1999)
  • An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic (2001)
  • Historical Ontology (2002)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ian Hacking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (350 words)
Ian Hacking, CC (born 1936 in Vancouver) is a philosopher, specializing in the philosophy of science.
Hacking also took his Ph.D. at Cambridge (1962), under the direction of Casimir Lewy, a former student of Wittgenstein's.
Hacking is known for bringing a historical approach to the philosophy of science and was one of the important members of the "Stanford School" in philosophy of science, a group that also included John Dupre, Nancy Cartwright, and Peter Galison.
Historical Ontology - Ian Hacking - Reviewed by: David Hyder University of Konstanz (2071 words)
Ian Hacking’s newest book is many things at once: an anthology of occasional pieces, a reflection on the uses of history in philosophy, a treatment of the work of Michel Foucault, a contraction and extension of ideas in Hacking’s earlier work.
Hacking concedes that he is arguing for a species of conceptual scheme; however, he contends that his notion is immune to the usual Davidsonian critique.
Hacking’s thinking bifurcates at this point as well: the critical intuition is developed further in the work on styles of reasoning; whereas the strong, ontological version is preserved in what he calls “dynamic nominalism”, even though the latter holds only for a restricted domain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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