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Encyclopedia > Iain Macleod
The Rt. Hon. Iain Macleod

In office
20 June 1970 – 20 July 1970
Prime Minister Edward Heath
Preceded by Roy Jenkins
Succeeded by Anthony Barber

Born 11 November 1913(1913-11-11)
Skipton, Yorkshire
Died 20 July 1970 (aged 56)
Political party Conservative

Iain Norman Macleod, PC (11 November 191320 July 1970) was a British Conservative Party politician and government minister. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... The Right Honourable Anthony Perrinott Lysberg Barber, Baron Barber, PC (4 July 1920 - 16 December 2005), was a Conservative member of the House of Lords. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Skipton is a town in North Yorkshire, England that lies along the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ...

Contents

Early life

Iain Macleod was born at Skipton, Yorkshire on 11 November 1913. His parents were from the Western Isles of Scotland and he grew up with strong personal and cultural ties to Scotland. He was briefly educated at Ermysted's Grammar School in Skipton and then at Fettes College in Edinburgh and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, receiving a Lower Second in History. Skipton is a town in North Yorkshire, England that lies along the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... A view of the old building from the School Drive Ermysteds Grammar School is a LEA-funded selective Boys Grammar School in Skipton, North Yorkshire teaching over 700 pupils. ... Skipton is a town in North Yorkshire, England that lies along the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Fettes College is an independent boarding and day school in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto - Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Graduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known as Caius (though pronounced... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... HIStory - Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double-disc album (one half greatest hits, one half studio album) by American musician Michael Jackson released in June of 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc, (HIStory Begins) contains fifteen hit singles from the past...


He was one of the great British bridge players, won the Gold Cup in 1937 and authored a book, Bridge is an Easy Game which contains a description of the Acol bidding system. A bridge connection earned him a job offer with a printing company, but by the late 1930s he was living the life of a playboy off his bridge earnings; he only gave up playing seriously (and relying on his bridge earnings) in the early 1950s when his developing political career became his priority. Contract bridge, usually known simply as bridge, is a trick-taking card game of skill and chance (the relative proportions depend on the variant played). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Acol is a bridge bidding system. ...


He fought briefly in France in 1940, suffering a serious war wound to the thigh which, particularly when combined with a later spinal condition (ankylosing spondylitis), was to leave him with pain and a limp for the rest of his life. Following his recovery from injury (and attendance at staff college), he landed in France on D-Day as DAQMG (Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General) of the 50th Northumbrian division and continued to serve in France until November 1944. He ended the war as a Major. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ...


He unsuccessfully contested a Scottish Western Isles constituency at the 1945 general election (there was no Conservative Party in the seat, so his father appointed himself Association Chairman). In 1946, he joined the Conservative Parliamentary Secretariat, subsequently merged into the Conservative Research Department. Here he became friends with Enoch Powell (the two would fall out over Powell's 1968 Rivers of Blood speech; Macleod did not speak to Powell ever again after the speech). Na h-Eileanan an Iar is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, created in 1918. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Research Department (CRD) was an integral part of the central organisation of the Conservative Party of the United Kingdom. ... Simon Heffers biography of Enoch Powell, published in 1999 John Enoch Powell, MBE (June 16, 1912 – February 8, 1998) was a British politician, linguist, writer, academic, soldier and poet. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... On April 20, 1968, the British politician Enoch Powell made a controversial speech in Birmingham to the annual meeting of the West Midlands Conservative Political Centre, in which he warned his audience of what he believed would be the consequences of continued immigration from the Commonwealth to Britain. ...


Political career

After the General Election of February 1950 he represented the parliamentary constituency of Enfield, West. Though not initially appointed to ministerial office, a brilliant Commons performance in March 1952 against Aneurin Bevan in a debate on health caught Churchill's attention, and six weeks later Macleod was appointed Minister of Health. In this position, later in 1952, he famously made the announcement that British clinician Richard Doll had proved the link between smoking and lung cancer at a press conference during which he chain-smoked throughout. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Borough of Enfield is the most northerly London borough and forms part of Outer London. ... A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll CH OBE FRS (28 October 1912–24 July 2005) was a British physiologist who became the foremost epidemiologist of the 20th century, turning the subject into a rigorous science. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ...


In the Eden and Macmillan governments he served first as Minister of Labour and National Service (1957-9) and then as Secretary of State for the Colonies (1959-61). Here he presided over considerable decolonisation, seeing Nigeria, British Somaliland, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Kuwait and British Cameroon become independent, and in Kenya he stopped the state of emergency and freed Kenyatta. He made a tour of Sub-Saharan Africa in 1960. His support as Minister for decolonisation, though it enjoyed Macmillan's personal support, was resisted by the Conservative Right; his role in negotiations over the future of Rhodesia attracted the damaging and much-remembered description of Macleod by the party grandee Robert Arthur James Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury as "too clever by half". The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... The British Somaliland was a British protectorate in the north part of the Horn of Africa, and later part of Somalia and presently the unrecognized Republic of Somaliland. ... Cameroons was a British Mandate territory in Nigeria and Cameroon. ... Jomo Kenyatta (October 20, 1892?–August 22, 1978) was an African politician, the first Prime Minister (1963–1964) and President (1964–1978) of an independent Kenya. ... A political map showing national divisions in relation to the ecological break (Sub-Saharan Africa in green) A geographical map of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is the term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Arthur James Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury KG (August 27, 1893-February 23, 1972) was a grandson of the great 3rd Marquess. ...


Not helping his acceptance by the more right-wing elements of his own party at the time, Macleod was against the death penalty and supported legalisation of abortion and homosexuality. Macleod established very good personal relations with both Aneurin Bevan and James Callaghan, even though he clashed with Callaghan numerous times at the dispatch box whilst serving as Shadow Chancellor in the 1960's. He did not get on with Callaghan's successor, Roy Jenkins, however, after the November 1967 government reshuffle, finding him both vain and arrogant. A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... The dispatch box in Australias Houses of Parliament in Canberra The dispatch box is a wooden box which serves as a lectern. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1961 he became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, leader of the House of Commons, and chairman of the Conservative Party organization. When Harold Macmillan resigned as Prime Minister in 1963, Macleod, despite his ability, was not considered a serious prospect for the leadership. Having lent his support to Rab Butler, and strongly opposed the successful candidacy of the Earl of Home (later Sir Alec Douglas-Home), Macleod (along with Enoch Powell) refused to serve under the latter as Prime Minister (though he did return to the shadow cabinet under Home after the 1964 election). Macleod did not contest the first ever party leadership election in 1965, but backed Edward Heath. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel,[1] KT, PC (2 July 1903 - 9 October 1995) 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October... Simon Heffers biography of Enoch Powell, published in 1999 John Enoch Powell, MBE (June 16, 1912 – February 8, 1998) was a British politician, linguist, writer, academic, soldier and poet. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


The coinage of the word stagflation is attributed to him. Speaking in the House of Commons on November 17, 1965, he said: "We now have the worst of both worlds — not just inflation on the one side or stagnation on the other, but both of them together. We have a sort of 'stagflation' situation. And history, in modern terms, is indeed being made." [1][dubious ] This article uses excessive clichés and jargon. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ...


While out of office in the mid-1960s he served as editor of The Spectator, where he caused further controversy by publishing in early 1964 a candid account of the 1963 party leadership contest. The Spectator is a conservative British political magazine, established 1828, published weekly. ...


On 20 June 1970, two days after the Conservative Party's election victory, Macleod was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer by Prime Minister Edward Heath. On 7 July 1970 he was rushed to hospital with appendicitis. He was discharged 11 days later but at 10.30pm on 20 July 1970, whilst at home in 11 Downing Street, he suffered a severe heart attack and died at 11.35pm. There seems little doubt that the long years of illness and pain had shortened his life. is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix[1]. While mild cases may resolve without treatment, most require removal of the inflamed appendix, either by laparotomy or laparoscopy. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ...


Macleod left behind him an outline budget which some observers found surprisingly hard-line in its proposals for control of public spending. He also bequeathed his successors a detailed plan for tax reform, much of which was put into action. Hardline was a radical deep ecology movement that had its roots in the straight edge hardcore scene. ...


Orator

Many Conservative politicians of generations following Macleod recalled him as a highly effective speaker. He famously humiliated Aneurin Bevan in a Commons debate on health in 1952, and said of the Labour Party under Gaitskell that, when offered their choice of weapons, they invariably chose boomerangs. He was reputed to be the only speaker that Harold Wilson was afraid of - he compared Wilson to a kipper, which has two faces. John Major specifically cited his example on taking office. Many believe he would have made a good leader for the party had he lived. A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Family

He married Evelyn Esther Mason (nee Blois) on 25 January 1941. They had a son and a daughter. Mrs. Macleod was struck in 1952 by meningitis and polio, but subsequently managed to walk again with the aid of sticks and worked hard to support her husband's career. After her husband's death she accepted a peerage and took her seat in the House of Lords as Baroness Macleod of Borve. Macleod's daughter Diana Heimann was a UK Independence Party candidate at Banbury in the 2005 general election. For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a right-wing political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... , The modern Castle Quay Shopping Centre in Banbury alongside the Oxford Canal, with Banbury Museum in the background. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ...


Offices held

Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
new constituency
Member of Parliament for Enfield West
1950–1970
Succeeded by
Cecil Parkinson
Political offices
Preceded by
Harry Crookshank
Minister of Health
1952–1955
Succeeded by
Robin Turton
Preceded by
Walter Monckton
Minister of Labour and National Service
1955–1959
Succeeded by
Edward Heath
Preceded by
Alan Lennox-Boyd
Secretary of State for the Colonies
1959–1961
Succeeded by
Reginald Maudling
Preceded by
Rab Butler
Chairman of the Conservative Party
1963: jointly with Lord Poole

1961–1963
Succeeded by
Lord Blakenham
Preceded by
Rab Butler
Leader of the House of Commons
1961–1963
Succeeded by
Selwyn Lloyd
Preceded by
Charles Hill
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1961–1963
Succeeded by
The Viscount Blakenham
Preceded by
Roy Jenkins
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1970
Succeeded by
Anthony Barber
Media offices
Preceded by
Iain Hamilton
Editor of The Spectator
1963–1965
Succeeded by
Nigel Lawson

Notes

  1. ^ House of Commons’ Official Report (also known as Hansard), 17 November 1965, page 1,165.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Entertainment - Home Page (245 words)
Iain Finlay Macleod is a writer and director from the Isle of Lewis in Scotland.
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Iain Macleod - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (434 words)
Iain Norman Macleod was born at Skipton, Yorkshire on 11 November 1913.
Macleod was from the liberal wing of the party and was against the death penalty, supported legalisation of abortion and homosexuality and the orthodox economic stance of the time.
Macleod's daughter Dianna Heimann was a UK Independence Party candidate in the 2005 general election.
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