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Encyclopedia > Iacchus
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Chthonic deities
Hades and Persephone,
Gaia, Demeter, Hecate,
Iacchus, Trophonius,
Triptolemus, Erinyes
Heroes and the Dead

In Greek mythology, Iacchus is an uncertain person. It may be an epithet for Dionysus (in Eleusis, a son of Zeus and Demeter) or a separate deity, a son of Persephone or Demeter. Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτᾶνες) are among a series of gods who oppose Zeus and the Olympian gods in their ascent to power. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... Hades (Greek: - HadÄ“s or - HáidÄ“s) (unseen) means both the ancient Greek abode of the dead and the god of that underworld. ... Bust of Persephone In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Classical Greek PersephónÄ“, Modern Greek Persefóni) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter. ... Image:Titans gaia. ... Dêmêtêr (or Demetra) (DEH-MEH-ter) (mother-goddess or perhaps distribution-mother) is the Greek goddess of agriculture, the pure nourisher of youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death, and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. ... In later Greek mythology, Hecate (or Hekate; Greek Ἑκάτη HekátÄ“) was scarcely more than the goddess of witchcraft and sorcery. ... Trophonius (the Latinate spelling) or Trophonios (in the transliterated Greek spelling) was a Greek hero or daimon or god - it was never certain which one - with a rich mythological tradition and an oracular cult at Lebadaea in Boeotia. ... Triptolemus (also Buzyges), in Greek mythology, was the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica. ... In Greek mythology the Erinyes or Eumenides (the Romans called them the Furies) were female personifications of vengeance. ... Hero cult was one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion. ... Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... Bacchus by Caravaggio The god Dionysus is occasionally confused with one of several historical figures named Dionysius, a theophoric name that simply means [servant] of Dionysus. ... Eleusis (Greek, Modern: Ελεύσινα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -is) was a small town about 30 km NW of Athens. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... Dêmêtêr (or Demetra) (DEH-MEH-ter) (mother-goddess or perhaps distribution-mother) is the Greek goddess of agriculture, the pure nourisher of youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death, and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. ... Bust of Persephone In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Classical Greek PersephónÄ“, Modern Greek Persefóni) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter. ... Dêmêtêr (or Demetra) (DEH-MEH-ter) (mother-goddess or perhaps distribution-mother) is the Greek goddess of agriculture, the pure nourisher of youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death, and preserver of marriage and the sacred law. ...


Iacchus was the torch bearer of the procession from Eleusis, he was sometimes regarded as the herald of the 'divine child' of the Goddess, born in the underworld, and sometimes the child itself. He was called ‘the light bearing star of the nocturnal mysteries’, giving him possible associations with Sirius and Sothis (see later for more details). Eleusis (Greek, Modern: Ελεύσινα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -is) was a small town about 30 km NW of Athens. ... This article is about the star. ... Sothis is the Greek name of a star that the Egyptians considered unusually significant. ...


Also, in Euripedes' The Bacchae, according to the translation by Philip Vellacott, the Bacchants cry out "To dance, calling in unison on the son of Zeus, "Iacchus! Bromius!" Euripides (c. ... In Greek mythology, Maenads [MEE-nads] were female worshippers of Dionysus, the Greek god of mystery, wine and intoxication. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ...


This suggests that they speak of Dionysus. Noting also that Bromius is a epithet of Dionysus, it can be assumed that Iacchus is too.


In Dion Fortune's novel "The Winged Bull", the main character invokes the name of Iacchus when he is unsure what to call a particular god he wishes to summon.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Iacchus information - Search.com (331 words)
In Greek mythology, Iacchus is an epithet of Dionysus, particularly associated with the Mysteries at Eleusis, where he was considered to be the son of Zeus and Demeter.
Iacchus was the torch bearer of the procession from Eleusis, sometimes regarded as the herald of the 'divine child' of the Goddess, born in the underworld, and sometimes as the child itself.
The most famous mention of Iacchus is in the Frogs of Aristophanes, where the Mystae invoke him as a riotous dancer in the meadow, attended by the Charities, who 'tosses torches' and is likened to a star bringing light to the darkness of the rites (Harrison, p.
Iacchus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (198 words)
It may be an epithet for Dionysus (in Eleusis, a son of Zeus and Demeter) or a separate deity, a son of Persephone or Demeter.
Iacchus was the torch bearer of the procession from Eleusis, he was sometimes regarded as the herald of the 'divine child' of the Goddess, born in the underworld, and sometimes the child itself.
In Dion Fortune's novel "The Winged Bull", the main character invokes the name of Iacchus when he is unsure what to call a particular god he wishes to summon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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