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Encyclopedia > IV Corps (ACW)

There were two corps of the Union Army called IV Corps during the American Civil War. They were separate units, one serving with the Army of the Potomac and the Department of Virginia in the Eastern Theater, 186263, the other with the Army of the Cumberland in the Western Theater, 186365. A corps (a word that immigrated from the French language, pronounced like English core, but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, a administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America between the United States of America, called the Union and the Confederate States of America, a new nation formed by 11 seceding states. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Contents


IV Corps (Eastern Theater)

The IV Corps, Army of the Potomac, was created on March 13, 1862, and placed under the command of Erasmus D. Keyes, who had commanded a brigade at First Bull Run. It consisted initially of three divisions, under Darius N. Couch, Silas Casey, and William F. “Baldy” Smith. Couch's division was transferred to join VI Corps during the Antietam Campaign and remained with them for the duration of the war. The corps' peak strength (in early 1862) was 37,000 men. March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 28,450 32,230 Casualties 460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing 387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 captured/missing The First Battle of Bull Run, known as... Darius N. Couch Darius Nash Couch (July 23, 1822 – February 12, 1897) was a U.S. Army officer, naturalist, and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Silas Casey Silas Casey (July 12, 1807 – January 22, 1882) was a career United States Army officer who rose to the rank of Major General during the American Civil War. ... William F. Baldy Smith William Farrar Smith (February 17, 1824 – February 28, 1903), was a civil engineer, a police commissioner, and Union general in the American Civil War. ... The VI Corps (Sixth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Confederate dead at Antietam The Maryland Campaign, or the Antietam Campaign, took place during September 1862 and is widely accepted as one of the major turning points of the American Civil War. ...

Union Army 1st Division Badge, IV Corps
Union Army 1st Division Badge, IV Corps

The corps took part in George B. McClellan's Peninsula Campaign of 1862, playing a major role in repulsing Confederate attacks at Seven Pines and Malvern Hill. After the campaign, IV Corps remained on the Peninsula, with Couch's division later detached. The corps was attached to the Department of Virginia under John A. Dix, and took part (along with VII Corps) in minor diversionary actions against Richmond during the Gettysburg Campaign. The corps was officially discontinued on August 1, 1863. Image File history File links IVcorpsbadge1. ... Image File history File links IVcorpsbadge1. ... George McClellan George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general (and briefly the general-in-chief of all the Union armies) during the American Civil War. ... Eastern Theater operations in 1862 Map of the events of the Peninsula Campaign The Peninsula Campaign (also known as the Peninsular Campaign) of the American Civil War was a major Union offensive operation launched in southern Virginia in March through July of 1862. ... The Battle of Seven Pines, also known as the Battle of Fair Oaks or Fair Oaks Station, took place from May 31 – June 1, 1862, in Henrico County, Virginia, as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Battle of Malvern Hill Conflict American Civil War Date July 1, 1862 Place Henrico County, Virginia Result Union victory The Battle of Malvern Hill, also known as the Battle of Poindexter’s Farm, took place on July 1, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798–April 21, 1879) was an American politician. ... Two corps of the Union Army were called VII Corps during the American Civil War. ... Eastern Theater operations in 1863, showing Chancellorsville and the Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3) The Gettysburg Campaign was a series of battles fought in June and July, 1863, during the American Civil War. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ...


Command History

Erasmus D. Keyes March 13, 1862 – August, 1862 Army of the Potomac
Erasmus D. Keyes August, 1862 – August 1, 1863 Department of Virginia

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ...

IV Corps (Western Theater)

This corps was created on October 10, 1863, from the remnants of XX and XXI Corps, both of which had suffered heavy casualties at Chickamauga. It was initially commanded by Gordon Granger and its division commanders were Philip Sheridan, John Palmer, and Thomas J. Wood. It served with distinction in the famous unordered attack on Missionary Ridge at Chattanooga, and served in the Knoxville and Atlanta Campaigns. During John B. Hood's Franklin-Nashville Campaign, General William T. Sherman left the IV (and XXIII Corps), under the overall command of General George H. Thomas, to defend Tennessee, and the corps was heavily engaged in the battles at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Two corps of the Union Army were called XX Corps during the American Civil War. ... XXI Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (66,000) Casualties 1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing 2,312 killed, 14,674 wounded, 1... Gordon Granger (November 6, 1822 – January 10, 1876) was a Union Major General during American Civil War. ... Philip Sheridan Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the great generals in the American Civil War. ... John McAuley Palmer (September 13, 1817 – September 25, 1900) was a Union Major General during the American Civil War. ... Thomas J. Wood was a Union General during the American Civil War. ... Missionary Ridge is a geographic feature in Chattanooga, Tennessee, site of the Battle of Missionary Ridge, a battle in the American Civil War, fought on November 25, 1863. ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ... Palisades and chevaux-de-frise in front of the Potter House, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. ... John Bell Hood John Bell Hood (June 1, 1831–August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... The Franklin-Nashville Campaign, also known as Hoods Tennessee Campaign, was a series of battles fought in the fall of 1864 in Alabama, Tennessee, and northwestern Georgia during the American Civil War. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... XXIII Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... General George H. Thomas George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870), the Rock of Chickamauga, was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general during the American Civil War. ... Battle of Spring Hill Conflict American Civil War Date November 29, 1864 Place Maury County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Spring Hill was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on November 29, 1864 in Maury County, Tennessee. ... Battle of Franklin II Conflict American Civil War Date November 30, 1864 Place Williamson County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Franklin was a major engagement of the American Civil War fought at Franklin, Tennessee on November 30, 1864. ... The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle in the Franklin-Nashville Campaign that represented the end of large-scale fighting in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ...


Records differ regarding the further history of the corps. Two sources[1] report that it was deactivated on August 1, 1865. A third[2] reports that after the war it was sent to Texas as part of the U.S. Army detachment dispatched to persuade French Emperor Napoleon III to withdraw his troops from Mexico, and was not disbanded until December 1865. August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (20 April 1808, Paris, France - 9 January 1873, Chislehurst, Kent, England) was President of France from 1849 to 1852, and then Emperor of the French under the name Napoléon III from 1852 to 1870. ...


Command History

Gordon Granger October 10, 1863April 10, 1864 Chattanooga and Knoxville
Oliver O. Howard April 10, 1864July 27, 1864 to Atlanta
David S. Stanley July 27, 1864December 1, 1864 wounded at Franklin
Thomas J. Wood December 1, 1864January 31, 1865 Nashville
David S. Stanley January 31, 1865August 1, 1865  

Gordon Granger (November 6, 1822 – January 10, 1876) was a Union Major General during American Civil War. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, ca. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Portrait of David Sloane Stanley by Mathew Brady, ca. ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas J. Wood was a Union General during the American Civil War. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Portrait of David Sloane Stanley by Mathew Brady, ca. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Notes

  1. ^  Eicher and Phisterer.
  2. ^  Fox. Stanley's personnel records indicate he commanded the Central District of Texas in June and July 1865, so a corps commander for the entire disputed period cannot be identified.

References

  • Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Fox, William F., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, reprinted by Morningside Bookshop, Dayton, Ohio, 1993, ISBN 0685721949.
  • Phisterer, Frederick, Statistical Record of the Armies of the United States, Castle Books, 1883, ISBN 0-7858-1585-6.

  Results from FactBites:
 
62nd New York Volunteer Infantry (380 words)
The regiment was attached to the IV Corps for its first months of service in Washington, DC.
The 62nd NY was transferred to the VI Corps of the Army of the Potomac, where it remained for the remainder of the war, except for brief service with the Army of the Shenandoah.
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VI Corps (ACW) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1843 words)
The VI Corps (Sixth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.
Despite being the largest corps in the Union army at the time, the VI Corps was held in reserve to the east of Gettysburg, excepting Alexander Shaler's Brigade, which was sent into action as a support to the XII Corps; several casualties, also occurred in Henry L. Eustis's and Frank Wheaton's Brigades, of Newton's Division.
The place of the 3rd Division was filled by the 3rd Division of the III Corps, that corps having been discontinued; the command of this division was given to Maj. Gen.
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