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Encyclopedia > IPA chart for English

This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


See International Phonetic Alphabet for English for a more complete version and Pronunciation respelling for English for phonetic transcriptions used in different dictionaries. The symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet can be used to show pronounciation in English. ... Many dictionaries and other language references give pronunciation guides for some or all words listed. ...


RP = Received Pronunciation Of perceived British Accent. GA = General American the name of an American English accent and not to be confused with the way the General American population speaks. AuE = Australian English. NZE = New Zealand English. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Australian English is a non-rhotic variety of English spoken by most native-born Australians. ... New Zealand English (NZE) is the English spoken in New Zealand. ...

Note: An image of the chart is also available.
IPA: English Consonants
IPA Examples
p pen, spin, tip
b but, web
t two, sting, bet
d do, odd
chair, nature, teach
gin, joy, edge
k cat, kill, skin, queen, thick
ɡ go, get, beg
f fool, enough, leaf
v voice, have
θ thing, teeth
ð this, breathe, father
s see, city, pass
z zoo, rose
ʃ she, sure, emotion, leash
ʒ pleasure, beige
h ham
m man, ham
n no, tin
ŋ ringer, sing, drink
l left, bell
ɹ run, very[1]
w we
j yes
ʍ what[2]
IPA: English Vowels
IPA Examples
United Kingdom RP United States GA Australia AuE New Zealand NZE
ɑː ɑ ɐː father
ɪ ɪ ɪ ɘ sit
i i i i city
i see
ɛ ɛ e e bed[3]
ɜː ɝ ɜː ɵː bird
æ æ æ ɛ lad, cat, ran[4][5]
ɑː ɑɹ ɐː arm
ʌ ʌ a ɐ run, enough
ɒ ɑ ɔ ɒ not, wasp
ɔː ɔ law, caught[6]
ʊ ʊ ʊ ʊ put, wood
u ʉː ʉː soon, through
ə ə ə ɘ about
ə ɚ ə ɘ winner[7]
IPA: English Diphthongs
IPA Examples
United Kingdom RP United States GA Australia AuE New Zealand NZE
æɪ æe day, pain
ɑe ɑe my, wise
ɔɪ ɔɪ oe boy
əʊ əʉ ɐʉ no, tow
æɔ æo now
ɪə ɪɹ ɪə near, here
ɛə ɛɹ hair, there[8]
ʊə ʊɹ ʊə ʉə tour
IPA: Marginal Sounds
IPA Examples
x Scottish loch
ʔ uh-(ʔ)oh
IPA: Other symbols used in transcription of English pronunciation
IPA Explanation
ˈ Primary stress (placed before the stressed syllable), for example rapping /ˈɹæpɪŋ/
ˌ Secondary stress, for example battleship /ˈbætl̩ˌʃɪp/
. Syllable separator, for example ice cream /aɪs.krim/ vs. I scream /aɪ.skrim/
 ̩ Syllabic consonant, for example ridden /ˈɹɪdn̩/

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 193 × 598 pixelsFull resolution‎ (541 × 1,675 pixels, file size: 102 KB, MIME type: image/png) Screenshot of IPA chart for English Same as Image:IPA Chart for English. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... In phonetics, a diphthong (also gliding vowel) (Greek δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally with two sounds, or with two tones) is a monosyllabic vowel combination involving a quick but smooth movement from one vowel to another, often interpreted by listeners as a single vowel sound or phoneme. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... For the computer operating system, see Syllable (operating system). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Although the symbol r technically represents an alveolar trill, which is absent from most dialects of English, it is nevertheless widely used instead of ɹ in phonemic transcriptions.
  2. ^ Some accents, such as Scottish and much of the American South; see whine and wine and voiceless labiovelar approximant
  3. ^ Often transcribed /e/ for RP, for example in Collins English Dictionary.
  4. ^ Often transcribed /a/ for RP, for example in dictionaries of the Oxford University Press.
  5. ^ See bad-lad split for more discussion of this vowel in Australian English.
  6. ^ See low back merger for more discussion of this vowel in American English.
  7. ^ Sometimes transcribed for GA as [əɹ], especially in transcriptions that represent both rhotic and non-rhotic pronunciations, as [ə(ɹ)].
  8. ^ Alternative symbols used in British dictionaries are /ɛː/ (Oxford University Press) and /eə/.

The alveolar trill is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Scottish English is usually taken to mean the standard form of the English language used in Scotland, often termed Scottish Standard English. ... // Southern American English as defined by the monophthongization of to before obstruents (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006:126). ... // H-cluster reductions The h-cluster reductions are various consonant clusters beginning with /h/ that have in the occurred in the history of English that have lost the /h/ in certain dialects. ... The voiceless labiovelar approximant (traditionally called a voiceless labiovelar fricative) is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... // Trap-bath split The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English (including Received Pronunciation), in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened... // Father-bother merger The father-bother merger is a merger of the Early Modern English vowels and that occurs in almost all varieties of North American English (exceptions are accents in Eastern New England (such as the Boston accent) and New York-New Jersey English. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ...

See also

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (899x887, 255 KB) // Summary Description in terms of clock hours and compass azimuth: The diagram is a subjective, kinesthetic impression of the position of the mouth while pronouncing monophthongs which occur in broad transcription of English: the position of the mouth... FAA radiotelephony phonetic alphabet and Morse code chart. ... This article is about algorithms for encryption and decryption. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... A list of writing systems (or scripts), classified according to some common distinguishing features. ... Many dictionaries and other language references give pronunciation guides for some or all words listed. ... This is a concise version of SAMPA for MUTHER FUCKING English sounds. ...

References

  • Gimson, A. C. (1980). An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English, 3rd edn., London: Edward Arnold. ISBN 0-7131-6287-2. 
  • Kenyon, John Samuel (1950). American Pronunciation, 10th edn., Ann Arbor: George Wahr. 
  • Kenyon, John S.; Thomas A. Knott (1944/1953). A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster. ISBN 0-87779-047-7. 
  • Wells, J. C. (2000). Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 2nd edn., Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Limited. ISBN 0-582-36468-X. 

Alfred Charles Gimson (7 June 1917 - 22 April 1985) was an English phonetician. ... John Samuel Kenyon (1874-1959) was an American linguist. ... The Kenyon & Knott (or KK) system is a collection of symbols, most of which correspond to the symbols of the IPA, used for representing the pronunciation of standard American English. ... John Christopher Wells, MA (Cantab), Ph. ...

External links

  • Learning the IPA for English, (Standard American English)
  • Online keyboard with MP3 sound files for IPA symbols
  • IPA chart with AIFF sound files for IPA symbols
  • IPA chart with MP3 sound files for all IPA symbols on the chart (limited version is available to anyone)
  • The International Phonetic Alphabet (revised to 2005) Symbols for all languages are shown on this one-page chart.
  • lexconvert a GPL command-line program to convert between Unicode IPA and the ASCII notations of various English speech synthesizers

  Results from FactBites:
 
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  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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