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Encyclopedia > Hysteria
Hysteria
Classifications and external resources
ICD-10 F41.8, F44
ICD-9 300.1

Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. The fear is often centered on a body part, most often on an imagined problem with that body part (disease is a common complaint). People who are "hysterical" often lose self-control due to the overwhelming fear. Image File history File links Information_icon. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) is a detailed description of known diseases and injuries. ... The following codes are used with International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) is a detailed description of known diseases and injuries. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... Emotion, in its most general definition, is an intense neural mental state that arises subjectively rather than through conscious effort and evokes either a positive or negative psychological response to move an organism to action. ... A disease or medical condition is an abnormality of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, distress, or death to the person afflicted or those in contact with the person. ...


Because of its association with female hysteria the term hysteria fell out of favor in the latter half of the 20th century. [1] The word "hysterical" was replaced with synonyms such as functional, nonorganic, psychogenic and medically unexplained. [1] In 1980 the American Psychiatric Association officially changed the diagnosis of “hysterical neurosis, conversion type” to “conversion disorder.”[1] Water massages as a treatment for hysteria c. ... The American Psychiatric Association is a professional organization of psychiatrists whose members are American and international physicians who are trained in psychiatry. ... // Definition Conversion Disorder is a DSM-IV diagnosis which describes neurological symptoms such as weakness, sensory disturbance and attacks that look like epilepsy but which can not be attributed to a known neurological disease. ...

Contents

History

Main article: Female hysteria

The term originates with the Greek medical term, hysterikos. This referred to a medical condition, thought to be particular to women, caused by disturbances of the uterus, hystera in Greek. The term hysteria was coined by Hippocrates, who thought that the cause of hysteria was irregular movement of blood from the uterus to the brain. Water massages as a treatment for hysteria c. ... This article is about the field and science of medical practice and health care. ... Diverse women. ... The uterus or womb is the major female reproductive organ of most mammals, including humans. ... Hippocrates of Cos II. or Hippokrates of Kos (c. ... Human circulatory system. ... In animals, the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system. ...


The same general definition, or under the name female hysteria, came into widespread use in the middle and late 19th century to describe what is today generally considered to be sexual dissatisfaction.[2] Typical "treatment" was massage of the patient's genitalia by the physician and later vibrators or water sprays to cause orgasm.[2] By the early 1900s the practice, and usage of the term, had fallen from use, until it was again popularised when the writings of Sigmund Freud became known and influential in Britain and the USA in the 1920s. The Freudian psychoanalytic school of psychology uses its own, somewhat controversial, ways to treat hysteria. Water massages as a treatment for hysteria c. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vibrators are devices intended to vibrate against the body (including insertion in a body cavity), thereby stimulating the nerves and giving a pleasurable and possibly erotic feeling. ... It has been suggested that Dry orgasm be merged into this article or section. ... // First flight by the Wright brothers, December 17, 1903. ... Sigmund Freud Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939; IPA pronunciation: []) was an Austrian neurologist and the co-founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... The 1920s was a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Sigmund Freud founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Psychology is an academic and applied field involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ...


The knowledge of hysterical processes was advanced by the work of Jean-Martin Charcot, a French neurologist. However, many now consider hysteria to be a legacy diagnosis (i.e., a catch-all junk diagnosis),[3] particularly due to its long list of possible manifestations: one Victorian physician catalogued 75 pages of possible symptoms of hysteria and called the list incomplete.[4]. Categories: People stubs | French physicians | 1825 births | 1893 deaths | History of medicine ... Neurology is the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it. ...


Mass hysteria

Main article: Mass hysteria

The term also occurs in the phrase mass hysteria to describe mass public near-panic reactions. It is commonly applied to the waves of popular medical problems that "everyone gets" in response to news articles. In psychology collective hysteria is the name given to a phenomenon of the manifestation of the same hysterical symptoms by more than one person. ...


A similar usage refers to any sort of "public wave" phenomenon, and has been used to describe the periodic widespread reappearance and public interest in UFO reports, crop circles, and similar examples. Also, when information, real or fake, becomes misinterpreted but believed, e.g. penis panic. A UFO or Unidentified Flying Object is any real or apparent flying object which cannot be identified by the observer and which remains unidentified after investigation. ... This article is about the band, Crop Circles, for information about the controversial phenomenon, see crop circle. ... Genital retraction syndrome (GRS), generally considered a culture-specific syndrome, is a condition in which an individual is overcome with the belief that his/her external genitals - or also, in females, breasts - are retracting into the body, shrinking, or in some male cases, may be imminently removed or disappear. ...


Hysteria is often associated with movements like the Salem Witch Trials, McCarthyism, the First Red Scare, the Second Red Scare, Terrorism, and Satanic ritual abuse, where it is better understood through the related sociological term of moral panic. 1876 illustration of the courtroom; the central figure is usually identified as Mary Walcott The Salem witch trials, which began in 1692 (also known as the Salem witch hunt and the Salem witchcraft episode), resulted in a number of convictions and executions for witchcraft in both Salem Village and Salem... Senator Joseph McCarthy McCarthyism is the term describing a period of intense anti-Communist suspicion in the United States that lasted roughly from the late 1940s to the late 1950s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Satanism Associated organizations Church of Satan First Satanic Church Prominent figures Anton LaVey | Blanche Barton | Peter H. Gilmore | Peggy Nadramia | Karla LaVey Associated concepts Left-Hand Path | Moral Majority | Pentagonal Revisionism | Suitheism | Survival of the fittest | Objectivism | Might is Right Books and publications The Satanic Bible | The Satanic Rituals | The... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Social mania. ...


External links

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c KINETZ, ERIKA. "Is Hysteria Real? Brain Images Say Yes", New York Times, 2006-09-26. Retrieved on 2006-09-26. (in English)
  2. ^ a b Rachel P. Maines (1999). The Technology of Orgasm: "Hysteria," the Vibrator, and Women's Sexual Satisfaction. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-6646-4.
  3. ^ Mark S. Micale (1993). "On the "Disappearance" of Hysteria: A Study in the Clinical Deconstruction of a Diagnosis". Isis 84: 496-526.
  4. ^ Laura Briggs (2000). "The Race of Hysteria: "Overcivilization" and the "Savage" Woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obsterics and Gynecology". American Quarterly 52: 246-73.
  • The H-Word, Guardian Unlimited, http://www.guardian.co.uk/weekend/story/0,3605,782338,00.html
  • Halligan, P.W., Bass, C., & Marshall, J.C. (Eds.)(2001). Contemporary Approach to the Study of Hysteria: Clinical and Theoretical Perspectives. Oxford University Press, UK.
  • Sander Gilman, Roy Porter, George Rousseau, Elaine Showalter, and Helen King (1993). Hysteria Before Freud (Berkeley, Los Angeles, and Oxford: University of California Press).

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Isis is an academic journal published by the University of Chicago devoted to the history of science, history of medicine, and the history of technology, as well as their cultural influences, featuring both original research articles as well as extensive book reviews and review essays. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
hysteria.html (739 words)
Attempts to account for 'hysteria' have included pointing to a particular affliction which causes the womb to 'wander', to patients' propensity to lie and manipulate, to lesions of the nerves, to ecstatic states, to demonic possession, to forms of protest, to inexplicable epidemics.
While the word 'hysteria' remains in current use, the formal diagnosis of hysteria, with its particular symptomatology, has largely ceased to be deployed in the course of the 20th century.
The 19th century was the period of hysteria's heyday, and it was then that the metaphorical slippage between symptom and behaviour, the illness and its sufferers, came to the fore.
Hysteria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (504 words)
Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses.
The term hysteria was coined by Hippocrates, who thought that the cause of hysteria was irregular movement of blood from the uterus to the brain.
Hysteria is often associated with movements like the Salem Witch Trials, the Red Scare, Terrorism, and Satanic ritual abuse, where it is better understood through the related sociological term of moral panic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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