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Encyclopedia > Hypostatic Union

The hypostatic union (also known as the mystical union), in Christian theology, refers to the dual nature of Jesus Christ as being simultaneously God and Man. The opposite of hypostatic union is monophysitism. Christianity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... A famous painting of Jesus from the Chapel of Łagiewniki Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from the Greek Ιησούς Χριστός ; transliteration: Iesous Christos). He is also considered an important prophet in Islam. ... Christ is the English representation of the Greek word Χριστός (transliterated as Khristós), which means anointed. ... God is the term used to denote the Supreme Being believed by monotheistic religions to exist and to be the creator and ruler of the Universe. ... Image of a man on the Pioneer plaque sent to interstellar space A man is a male human adult, in contrast to an adult female, which is a woman. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ...


Hypostatic union is a theological term used with reference to the Incarnation to express the revealed truth that in Christ one person subsists in two natures; the divine and the human. Hypostasis means, literally, that which lies beneath as the basis or foundation. It thus came to be used by the Greek philosophers to denote reality as distinguished from mere appearance (Aristotle, "Mund.", IV, 21). It occurs also in Saint Paul's Epistles (II Corinthians 9:4; 11:17; Hebrews I, 3:III, 14), but not in the sense of a person. Previous to the Council of Nicea (325), the term hypostasis was sometimes synonymous with ousios, and even St. Augustine (De Trin., V, 8) declared that he saw no difference between them. The distinction was in fact brought about gradually in the course of the controversies to which the Christological heresies gave rise and was definitively established by the Council of Chalcedon (451), which declared that in the Christ there are two natures; each retaining its own properties, and together united in one subsistence and in one single person (eis en prosopon kai mian hupostasin) (Denzinger, ed. Bannwart, 148). The two natures are not joined in a moral or accidental union (Nestorius), nor commingled (Eutyches), but nevertheless they are substantially united. The precise nature of this union is held to defy human comprehension, hence the alternative term "mystical union." Look up Incarnation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Incarnation, which literally means enfleshment, refers to the conception, and live birth of a sentient creature (generally human) who is the material manifestation of an entity or force whose original nature is immaterial. ... For information on the last book of the New Testament see the entry on the Book of Revelation. ... Christ is the English representation of the Greek word Χριστός (transliterated as Khristós), which means anointed. ... In Christianity, the Greek word hypostasis [1] is usually translated into Latin as persona and then into English as person. ... Aristotle, marble copy of bronze by Lysippos. ... An early portrait of the Apostle Paul. ... The word epistle is from the Greek word epistolos which means a written letter addressed to a recipient or recipients, perhaps part of exchanged correspondence. ... Council of Nicaea can refer to: First Council of Nicaea in AD 325 Second Council of Nicaea in AD 787 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events May 20 - First Council of Nicaea - first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church: The Nicene Creed is formulated, the date of Easter is discussed. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... St. ... Christology is that part of Christian theology that studies and defines who Jesus Christ is. ... The Council of Chalcedon was an ecumenical council that took place from October 8—November 1, 451 at Chalcedon, a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor. ... Events April 7 - The Huns sack Metz June 20 - Attila, king of the Huns is defeated at Troyes by Aetius in the Battle of Chalons. ... Nestorius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Eutyches (c. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia (also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia today) is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the The Encyclopedia Press, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. // History The writing of the encyclopedia began on January 11...


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Hypostatic union - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (230 words)
The hypostatic union (also known as the mystical union), in Christian theology, refers to the dual nature of Jesus Christ as being simultaneously God and Man.
Hypostatic union is a theological term used with reference to the Incarnation to express the revealed truth that in Christ one person subsists in two natures; the divine and the human.
The two natures are not joined in a moral or accidental union (Nestorius), nor commingled (Eutyches), but nevertheless they are substantially united.
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