FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hypostasis (religion)
Part of the series on
Christianity

History of Christianity
Jesus of Nazareth
The Apostles
Ecumenical councils
Great Schism
The Crusades
Reformation The history of Christianity is difficult to extricate from that of the European West (and several other culture-regions) in general. ... image of a Latin cross. ... This article outlines the history of Christianity and provides links to relevant topics. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ not being a name but rather a title meaning Anointed. He is also considered a very important prophet in Islam and a manifestation of... For the twelve apostles chosen by Jesus, see Apostles See also London Arch (formerly London Bridge) Loch Ard Gorge The Gibson Steps The Grotto Categories: Australia geography stubs | Cliffs | Geography of Australia ... In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, an ecumenical council or general council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... The East-West Schism, known also as the Great Schism (though this latter term sometimes refers to the later Western Schism), was the event that divided Chalcedonian Christianity into Western Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which emerged in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church in Western Europe. ...

The Trinity
God the Father
Christ the Son
The Holy Spirit Within Christianity, the catholic doctrine of the Trinity states that God is a single being who exists, simultaneously and eternally, as a communion of three Persons: the Father, the Son (the eternal Logos, incarnate as Jesus of Nazareth), and the Holy Spirit. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... This page is about the title, for the Christian figure, see Jesus Christ is the English representation of the Greek word Χριστός (transliterated as Khristós), which means anointed. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

The Bible
Old Testament
New Testament
Apocrypha
The Gospels
Ten Commandments
Sermon on the Mount The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Note: Judaism uses the term Tanakh instead of Old Testament, because it does not recognize the New Testament as being part of the Biblical canon. ... // What is the New Testament? The New Testament, sometimes called the Greek Testament or Greek Scriptures, is the name given to the part of the Christian Bible that was written after the birth of Jesus. ... Apocrypha is a Greek word (απόκρυφα, neuter plural of απόκρυφος), from αποκρυπτειν, to hide away. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... The Ten Commandments on a monument in the grounds of the Texas State Capitol This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated 1675 decalogue at the Esnoga synagogue of Amsterdam The Ten Commandments, or Decalogue, is a list of religious and moral imperatives which, according to the Bible, was... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ...

Christian theology
Salvation · Grace
Christian worship Christian theology practices theology from a Christian viewpoint or studies Christianity theologically. ... Salvation refers to deliverance from an undesirable state or condition. ... Divine grace is believed by Christians to be the sovereign favour of God exercised in the bestowment of blessings upon those who have no merit in them. ... This article is in need of attention. ...

Christian Church
Catholicism
Orthodox Christianity
Protestantism The term Christian Church expresses the idea that organised Christianity (the Christian religion) is seen as an institution. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... Orthodox Christianity is a generalized reference to the Eastern traditions of Christianity, as opposed to the Western traditions which descend from the Catholic Church. ... Protestantism is a movement within Christianity, representing a split from within the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-to-late Renaissance in Europe —a period known as the Protestant Reformation. ...


Christian denominations
Christian movements
Christian ecumenism
A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body, organization under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... Christian movements are theological, political, or philosophical intepretations of Christianity that are not generally represented by a specific church, sect, or denomination. ... Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ...

In Christianity, the Greek word hypostasis [1] is usually translated into Latin as natura and then into English as nature, although the specific Greek word for nature and substance is "physis." The Christian view of the Trinity is often described as a view of one God existing in three different persons (prosoponoi), but some early Christian writers -- who were condemned as heterodox or as heretics, believed that there were mutliple hypostases in God and in humanity. The actual literal translation of the term hypostasis is "that which abides under," or "that which gives meaning to" or, just simply, "understanding." The mystical significance of the term differs from words which translate as "substance," but are akin to the more ultimate idea of essence, as found in the Greek term "ousia." The history of Christianity is difficult to extricate from that of the European West (and several other culture-regions) in general. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Natura Cosméticos S/A (Bovespa: is one of the Brazilian leading manufacturers and marketers of skin care, solar filters, cosmetics, perfume and hair care products. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Nature Conservancy - a charitable organization devoted to preserving natural diversity worldwide English Nature UK government organization devoted to preserving natural diversity in the UK Nature Detectives An online research and education project for under 18s in the UK A Guide to Nature and Wildlife Conservation Categories: | ... Within Christianity, the catholic doctrine of the Trinity states that God is a single being who exists, simultaneously and eternally, as a communion of three Persons: the Father, the Son (the eternal Logos, incarnate as Jesus of Nazareth), and the Holy Spirit. ... Monotheism (in Greek μόνος = single and θεός = God) is the belief in a single, universal, all-encompassing deity. ...


Generally, in Eastern Christian theology, the whole universe is said to be essentially built out of the same essence that is the only ultimate Essence: God. However, Essence is said to become differentiated into essences, which take on ever denser concreteness, and this is more akin to the idea of a substance. Hence, the term "hypostasis" is usually fuzzily translated as "nature," and occasionally poorly translated as "substance." The word is used prominently in the original Greek version of the Nicene Creed in this sense. See also: Hypostatic union. The term has also been used and is still used in modern Greek (not just Koine Greek or common ancient Greek) to mean "existence" or "being-ness." Look up Substance on Wiktionary, the free dictionary * in philosophy, Substance is that element of an object without which it would not exist. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The hypostatic union (also known as the mystical union), in Christian theology, refers to the dual nature of Jesus Christ as being simultaneously God and Man. ... Koine Greek () is an ancient Greek dialect which marks the 2nd stage in the history of the Greek language. ...


In the formula defining the Hypostatic Union at the ecumenical Council of Chalcedon, the word is employed to explain that there is one existence which is purely Divine, and another existence that is truly human, and that these two distinct "being-ness-es" are united in the single person (in Greek, prosopon) of Jesus Christ. The Oriental Orthodox, bristling at the way the Chalcedonian definition was crafted, posit that this union of the two distinct natures in Jesus Christ actually births a third hypostasis, that of redeemed humanity, the new creation. After many centuries of struggle over this issue, the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox have come to agreement on the matter. This is to distingush them from the monphysites, who believe that there is only one nature (in Greek, physis) in Jesus Christ. The Council of Chalcedon was an ecumenical council that took place from October 8—November 1, 451 at Chalcedon, a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ...


In the concept of metousiosis, the theological basis of the doctrine of the Real Presence in the Eucharist, among the transformations that occur in the holy mystery is that the essential understanding -- or that which gives the thing meaning -- of the bread and of the wine are changed. Hence, the hypostases of bread and wine are mystically changed to be the hypostasis of the Risen Christ, as truly as Christ's own flesh and blood. While the physis of the bread and of the wine may remain, the ousia has changed. This is not a philosophical distinction, as in transubstantiation, as between "accidents" and "substance," but a mystical distinction between a substance and its essence. It is a mystical distinction in part because it is relational: the hypostases of the bread and wine have changed in the mystery so that the participants/partakers may be changed (in their very hypostasis) by the mystery, so that the mystery may be lived-forth by the participants/partakers in the world. Metousiosis is a Greek mystical term that literally means a great change of essence. ... Real Presence is a doctrine of many Christian traditions that Jesus the Christ is physically present in the bread and wine of the Eucharist or Holy Communion. ... The Eucharist is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... In modern colloquial English, a mystery is a subgenre of detective fiction (see mystery fiction). ... Transubstantiation is the belief held by many Christian denominations that the Eucharistic elements of bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus during Consecration. ... In modern colloquial English, a mystery is a subgenre of detective fiction (see mystery fiction). ...


The argument that somehow the Christian pan-en-theistic God, a monotheistic and monistic conception of the Divinity, would somehow be a polytheistic idea of Divinity which would include multiple hypostases has come from the writings of various theologians who were condemned as either heterodox or heretical. Christain orthodoxy conceives of three prosoponoi (personae) -- Source and Logos and Spirit -- within one Divine hypostasis.


As evidence that the idea of multiple hypostases is borrowed from pagan sources, anti-trinitarians often cite the apologist for a modalistic conception of God, the bishop Marcellus of Ancyra, who wrote in On the Holy Church, 9: Nontrinitarianism or (the Roman Catholic term) Antitrinitarianism, is the doctrine that rejects the Trinitarian doctrine that God subsists as three distinct persons in the single substance of the Holy Trinity. ... In Christianity, Sabellianism (also known as modalism) is the second-century belief that the three persons of the Trinity are merely different modes or aspects of God, rather than three distinct persons. ... Marcellus of Ancyra (? - c. ...

Now with the heresy of the Ariomaniacs, which has corrupted the Church of God...These then teach three hypostases, just as Valentinus the heresiarch first invented in the book entitled by him On the Three Natures. For he was the first to invent three hypostases and three persons of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and he is discovered to have filched this from Hermes, Plato and Aristotle. (Source: AHB Logan: Marcellus of Ancyra (Pseudo-Anthimus), On the Holy Church: Text, Translation and Commentary. Verses 8-9. Journal of Theological Studies, NS, Volume 51, Pt. 1, April 2000, p.95 ). Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Valentinius, more usually called Valentinus (c. ... A Heresiarch (also hæresiarch, according to the OED) is a founder or leader of a Heretical doctrine or movement, as considered by those who claim to maintain an orthodox religious tradition or doctrine. ... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles HermÄ“s (pronounced HUR-mees; Greek: Έρμης: pile of marker stones), in Greek mythology, is the god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators, literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and... Plato (Greek: Πλάτων Plátōn) (ca. ... Aristotle, marble copy of bronze by Lysippos. ... Alistair Logan (AHB Logan) is a professor of Biblical Studies at the University of Exeter in England. ...

Trinitarians defend the view of three prosoponoi in the single hypostasis of the Godhead by appeal to Jewish pneumatology (the "Spirit of God" and "Spirit of the Lord" and descriptions of God's breath or the Divine wind); from Wisdom writings (the "Angel of the Lord," the "Wisdom of the Lord," etc.) and a study of Jewish conceptions of the prophetic "word of the Lord" which comes to the prophets, and by the authority of which they declared "thus says the Lord"; the New Testament's doctrine of the identity of Christ which developed after the resurrection, and the pattern of prayer, devotion, and theological apologetics exhibited in the early Church. Within Christianity, the catholic doctrine of the Trinity states that God is a single being who exists, simultaneously and eternally, as a communion of three Persons: the Father, the Son (the eternal Logos, incarnate as Jesus of Nazareth), and the Holy Spirit. ... Pneumatology refers to the study of spiritual beings and phenomena, especially the interactions between humans and God. ... A prophet is a person who is believed to communicate with God, or with a deity. ... // What is the New Testament? The New Testament, sometimes called the Greek Testament or Greek Scriptures, is the name given to the part of the Christian Bible that was written after the birth of Jesus. ... This page is about the title, for the Christian figure, see Jesus Christ is the English representation of the Greek word Χριστός (transliterated as Khristós), which means anointed. ... It has been suggested that Resurrection of the dead be merged into this article or section. ... Apologetics is the field of study concerned with the systematic defense of a position. ... This article outlines the history of Christianity and provides links to relevant topics. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Llewellyn Encyclopedia: Celtic Religion (2070 words)
She represents that which is sexually appealing to men, and became the horseman’s guide when incarnate as a mare.
This local goddess was neither a maiden, matron, and crone of the moon (as a 20th-century theory would have it), and wasn’t necessarily remnant of "matriarchal" religion, for she was an ideal of male desire.
Druidic rituals were similar to the rituals of the Zoroastrian religion of the Magi (the Mobads).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m