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Encyclopedia > Hypertensive

In medicine, hypertension refers to the problem of abnormally high blood pressure.


There are three main types of hypertension, namely:

  1. arterial hypertension - with an elevated blood pressure in the systemic circulation
  2. pulmonary hypertension - with an elevated blood pressure in the pulmonary circulation
  3. portal hypertension with an elevated blood pressure in the portocaval system

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hypertension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2497 words)
Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure.
Hypertension produced by renal disease.A simple explanation for renal vascular hypertension is that decreased perfusion of renal tissue due to stenosis of a main or branch renal artery activates the renin-angiotensin system.
Malignant hypertension (or accelerated hypertension) is distinct as a late phase in the condition, and may present with headaches, blurred vision and end-organ damage.
hypertension - Columbia Encyclopedia article about hypertension (820 words)
hypertension or high blood pressure, elevated blood pressure blood pressure, force exerted by the blood upon the walls of the arteries.
Hypertension is generally defined as a blood pressure reading greater than 140 over 90; presssures of 120–139 over 80–89 are now considered prehypertension.
Known as the "silent killer," hypertension often produces few overt symptoms; it may, however, result in damage to the heart, eyes, kidneys, or brain and ultimately lead to congestive heart failure congestive heart failure, inability of the heart to expel sufficient blood to keep pace with the metabolic demands of the body.
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