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Encyclopedia > Hyperspace (science fiction)
Scene from Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope depicting the inside of the Millenium Falcon when entering hyperspace.

Hyperspace is a fictional plot device sometimes used in science fiction. It is typically described as an alternate region of space co-existing with our own universe which may be entered using an energy field or other device. Travel in hyperspace is frequently depicted as faster than travel in normal space. Image File history File links Hyperspace. ... A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Universe is defined as the summation of all particles and energy that exist and the space-time in which all events occur. ...


Hyperspace is sometimes used to enable and explain faster than light (FTL) travel in science fiction stories where FTL is necessary for interstellar travel or intergalactic travel. Spacecraft able to use hyperspace for FTL travel are sometimes said to have hyperdrive. For other uses, see Faster than the speed of light (disambiguation). ... Artists depiction of a hypothetical Wormhole Induction Propelled Spacecraft, based loosely on the 1994 warp drive paper of Miguel Alcubierre. ... Intergalactic travel is travel between galaxies, and is considered much more technologically demanding than even interstellar travel. ... The Space Shuttle Discovery as seen from the International Space Station. ... Hyperdrive is a name given to certain methods of traveling faster than light (FTL) in science fiction. ...


Detailed descriptions of the mechanisms of hyperspace travel are often provided in stories using the plot device, sometimes incorporating some actual physics such as relativity or string theory in order to create the illusion of a prima facie plausible explanation. Hyperspace travel is nevertheless a fictional technology. This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... In physics, the term relativity is used in several, related contexts: Galileo first developed the principle of relativity, which is the postulate that the laws of physics are the same for all observers. ... Interaction in the subatomic world: world lines of pointlike particles in the Standard Model or a world sheet swept up by closed strings in string theory String theory is a model of fundamental physics whose building blocks are one-dimensional extended objects called strings, rather than the zero-dimensional point... Look up prima facie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Normal Space

In normal space, the "shortest path" in 3-D space between two events A and B is found in the following way. First, look at all paths in 4-D space-time between A and B, and find the space-time path that takes the shortest time to traverse. Because of relativity, there is no such thing as universal time: so let the time be measured with respect to a clock whose motion matches the space-time path. Call this space-time path "P". Then the shortest path in space is simply the path in space traced by the space-time path P.


In strict mathematical terms, it may be impossible to define such a path, along which matter can travel. However, it usually is possible to find an infinite sequence of paths that converge uniformly to some limit, that is, some "limiting" path. Of course, under relativity, matter may not be able to travel along this limiting path, but light can travel along this path. In fact, the path of the light beam from A to B is the theoretical limit. No ship in normal space could follow the path of light in 4-D space time, but it can get arbitrarily close (until the energy required to go any faster exceeds the energy available).


This path (or limiting path) may not be unique: there may be many "shortest paths." Also, no path may exist; for example, suppose A lies in a black hole and B lies outside the same black hole (Hawking radiation is irrelevant, since it is random and carries neither information nor matter to the outside). Finally, because of the general relativity, this path is not a "straight line" in the strict Euclidean sense, but is "curved." For example, if we aimed a rocket at the Moon travelling near the speed of light, the shortest path to the Moon is still a curved path. In fact, even if we aimed a photon of light at the Moon, it will follow a curved path, since gravity bends all things, even light. It is still possible to travel in a straight line to the Moon, yet since the curved light beam is the best, the curved path close to this beam is better than the straight path. Of course, if we take energy expenditures into account, then the minimum energy paths are just the good-old transfer orbits and gravity boosts that Earth space agencies use all the time. Yet these are not "fast." In physics, Hawking radiation (also known as Bekenstein-Hawking radiation) is a thermal radiation thought to be emitted by black holes due to quantum effects. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ...


Hyperspace Travel

Generally speaking, the idea of hyperspace relies on the existence of a separate and adjacent dimension. When activated, the hyperdrive shunts the starship into this other dimension, where it can cover vast distances in an amount of time greatly reduced from the time it would take in "normal" space. Once it reaches the point in hyperspace that corresponds to its destination in real space, it re-emerges. One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ...


In other words, some (or all) paths in hyperspace may have a travel-time less than the time it takes to traverse the "shortest-path" in normal space, defined above. The time it takes to travel in hyperspace is measured in the same way time is measured in normal space, unless the hyperspace is discontinuous. For example, the path in hyperspace may not be smooth but a sequence of points, and the time change from jumping from one point to another may be abrupt. In this case, add the time jumps. Some may be positive (jumps to the future), and some negative (jumps to the past), depending on how the hyperspace is defined.


Explanations of why ships can travel faster than light in hyperspace vary; hyperspace may be smaller than real space and therefore a starship's propulsion seems to be greatly multiplied, or else the speed of light in hyperspace is not a barrier as it is in real space. Whatever the reasoning, the general effect is that ships traveling in hyperspace seem to have broken the speed of light, appearing at their destinations much quicker and without the shift in time that the Theory of Relativity would suggest. Two-dimensional analogy of space-time curvature described in General Relativity. ...


In much science fiction, hyperdrive jumps require a considerable amount of planning and calculation, with any error carrying a threat of dire consequences. Therefore, jumps may cover a much shorter distance than would actually be possible so that the navigator can stop to "look around" -- take his bearings, plot his position, and plan the next jump. The time it takes to travel in hyperspace also varies. Travel may be instantaneous or may take hours, days, weeks or more.


A different concept, sometimes also referred to as 'hyperspace' and similarly used to explain FTL travel in fiction, is that the manifold of ordinary three-dimensional space is curved in four or more 'higher' spacial dimensions (a 'hyperspace' in the geometric sense; see hypersurface, tesseract, Flatland). This curvature causes certain widely separated points in three-dimensional space to nonetheless be 'adjacent' to each other four-dimensionally. Creating an aperture in 4D space (a wormhole) between these locations can allow instantaneous transit between the two locations; a common comparison is that of a folded piece of paper, where a hole punched through two folded sections is more direct than a line drawn between them on the sheet. This idea probably arose out of certain popular descriptions of General Relativity and/or Riemannian manifolds, and may be the original form from which later concepts of hyperspace arose. This form often restricts FTL travel to specific 'jump points'. See jump drive, Alcubierre drive. In mathematics, a hypersurface is some kind of submanifold. ... In geometry, the tesseract, also called 8-cell or octachoron, is the four-dimensional analog of the (three-dimensional) cube, where motion along the fourth dimension is often a representation for bounded transformations of the cube through time. ... For various uses of the term Flatlander, see Flatlander (disambiguation) Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a 1884 novella by Edwin Abbott Abbott, still popular among mathematics and computer science students, and considered useful reading for people studying topics such as the concept of other dimensions. ... Analogy to a wormhole in a curved 2D space (see Embedding Diagram) Artists impression of a wormhole as seen by an observer crossing the event horizon of a Schwarzschild wormhole, which is similar to a Schwarzschild black hole but with the singularity replaced by an unstable path to a... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ... In Riemannian geometry, a Riemannian manifold is a real differentiable manifold in which each tangent space is equipped with an inner product in a manner which varies smoothly from point to point. ... Jump drive is a name given to a method of traveling faster than light in science fiction. ... This article is about the Alcubierre metric. ...


Early hyperspace depictions

Though the concept of hyperspace did not emerge until the 20th century, stories of an unseen realm outside of our normal world are part of earliest oral tradition. Some stories, before the development of the science fiction genre, feature space travel using a fictional existence outside of what humans normally observe. In "Somnium" (published 1634), Johannes Kepler tells of travel to the moon with the help of demons. From the 1930s through 1950s, many stories in the science fiction magazines, Amazing Stories and Astounding Science Fiction introduced readers to hyperspace as a fourth spatial dimension. John Campbell’s "Islands of Space," which first appeared in Amazing Stories in 1931, features an early reference to hyperspace. Oral tradition or oral culture is a way of transmitting history, literature or law from one generation to the next in a civilization without a writing system. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Somnium (Latin for The Dream) is a fantasy written between 1620 and 1630 by Johannes Kepler in which a student of Tycho Brahe is transported to the Moon by occult forces. ... Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer, and a key figure in the 17th century astronomical revolution. ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Oct. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... The cover of , volume 1, with a picture of Campbell drawn by Frank Kelly Freas John Wood Campbell, Jr. ...


Writers of stories in magazines used the hyperspace concept in various ways. In The Mystery of Element 117 (1949) by Milton Smith, a window is opened into a new 'hyperplane of hyperspace' containing those who have already died on earth. In Arthur C. Clarke's Technical Error (1950), an accident causes a man to be laterally reversed due to a brief encounter with "hyperspace." Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (born 16 December 1917) is a British science-fiction author and inventor, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ...


Hyperspace travel became widespread in science fiction due to the perceived limitations of FTL travel in ordinary space. In E.E. Smith’s, Grey Lensman (1939) a '5th order drive' allows travel to anywhere in the universe while hyperspace weapons are used to attack spaceships. In Nelson Bond’s The Scientific Pioneer Returns (1940), the hyperspace concept is described. Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series, first published between 1942 and 1944 in Astounding Science Fiction, featured a Galactic Empire traversed through hyperspace. Asimov's short story, Little Lost Robot (1947), features a 'Hyperatomic Drive' shortened to 'Hyperdrive' and goes on to describe how "...fooling around with hyper-space isn't fun." Grey Lensman in Astounding Oct. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American Jewish author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Hari Seldons holographic image, pictured on a paperback edition of Foundation, appears at various times in the First Foundations history, to guide it through the social and economic crises that befall it. ... Galactic empires are a fairly common theme in science fiction. ... Little Lost Robot (1947) is science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. ...


Popular depictions in science fiction

By the 1950s, hyperspace travel was established as a typical means for traveling . Many stories feature hyperspace as a dangerous place, and others require a ship to follow set Hyperspatial 'highways'. Hyperspace is often described as being an unnavigable dimension where straying from one's preset course can be disastrous.


In some science fiction, the danger of hyperspace travel is due to the chance that the route through hyperspace may take a ship too close to a celestial body with a large gravitational field, such as a star. In such scenarios, if a starship passes too close to a large gravitational field while in hyperspace, the ship is forcibly pulled out of hyperspace and reverts to normal space. Therefore, certain hyperspace "routes" may be mapped out that are safe, not passing too close to stars or other dangers.


Starships in hyperspace are typically isolated from the normal universe; they cannot communicate with nor perceive things in real space until they emerge. Often there can be no interaction between two ships even when both are in hyperspace. This effect can be used as a plot device; because they are invisible to each other while in hyperspace, ships will encounter each other most often around contested planets or space stations. Hyperdrive may also allow for dramatic escapes as the pilot "jumps" to hyperspace in the midst of battle to avoid destruction.


In many stories, for various reasons, a starship cannot enter or leave hyperspace too close to a large concentration of mass, such as a planet or star; this means that hyperspace can only be used after a starship gets to the outside edge of a solar system, so the starship must use other means of propulsion to get to and from planets. The reasons given for such restrictions are usually technobabble, but their existence is just a plot device allowing for interstellar policies to actually form and exist. Science fiction author Larry Niven published his opinions to that effect in N-Space. According to him such an unrestricted technology would give no limits to what heroes and villains could do. In fact, every criminal would have the ability to destroy colonies, settlements and indeed whole worlds without any chance of stopping him. STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... Technobabble (a portmanteau of technology and babble) is a form of prose using jargon, buzzwords and highly esoteric language to give an impression of plausibility through mystification and misdirection. ... A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the short story collection. ...


Other writers have limited access to hyperspace by requiring a very large expenditure of energy in order to open a link (sometimes called a jump point) between hyperspace and normal space; this effectively limits access to hyperspace to very large starships, or to large stationary jump gates that can open jump points for smaller vessels. These restrictions are often plot devices to prevent starships from easily escaping by slipping into hyperspace, thus ensuring epic space battles. Hyperspace is often depicted as blue, pulsing with Cherenkov radiation. Detailed depictions are listed below. A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... Cherenkov radiation glowing in the core of a TRIGA reactor Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Cerenkov or sometimes ÄŒerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle passes through an insulator at a speed greater than the speed of light in that medium. ...


Robot/Foundation series Isaac Asimov

The concept of traveling between stellar systems via the hyperspace drive or "jump" is described or mentioned in several of Isaac Asimov's short stories and novels written from the 1940s through to the 1990s. Hyperspace seems to enable teleportation on a pre-calculated route, the ends of which are in normal space. Although the timeline is not consistent, it appears to start with the development of a hyperdrive from a theoretical construct by The Brain, a positronic supercomputer built by US Robots. Interplanetary travel has already been developed, and in 2002, when US Robots demonstrates its first primitive positronic robot, it is intended to be used for mining operations on the planet Mercury. Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American Jewish author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Space has been an interest for philosophers and scientists for much of human history. ... A positronic brain is a fictional technological device, originally conceived by science fiction writer Isaac Asimov. ... A supercomputer is a computer that led the world (or was close to doing so) in terms of processing capacity, particularly speed of calculation, at the time of its introduction. ... US Robots and Mechanical Men, Inc. ... This article is about the planet. ...


Simultaneously, the theories of the spacewarp are developed by a research project under military control, with the assistance of positronic robots, until the first hypership is built at Hyper Base on an asteroid. Once perfected however, the drive is little used, as it is fearfully heavy in energy use and still very risky. But once the existence of habitable planets around the nearer stars to Earth is established (also with robot help), the drive is further developed, and over centuries colonies are established on these planets. 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ...


The collection of more and more data on stellar systems and the analysis of stellar spectra allows the compilation of what becomes the Standard Galactic Ephemeris, with which hyperspace navigation (see The Stars, Like Dust) becomes less of an art and more of a science. It still requires complex calculations; not until the fall of the Galactic empire and expansion of the Foundation thousands of years after the first drives were developed would a ship be developed (as in Foundation's Edge) that allows the total computerization of the calculation of single or multiple hyperspace jumps and the control of the jump without human intervention. There is no description of the hyperspace environment, as travel through it is instantaneous (it must be mentioned however, that in all of Asimov's book where hyperspace travel is described-except for Foundation's Edge, where the time in hyperspace is very short-the travel is said to involve a feeling of momentary "insideoutness"). An ephemeris (plural: ephemerides) (from the Greek word ephemeros = daily) is a device giving the positions of astronomical objects in the sky. ... The Stars, Like Dust is a book by science fiction writer Isaac Asimov. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Foundations Edge Foundations Edge is a novel by Isaac Asimov, the fourth book in the Foundation Series. ...


Dune

A somewhat unusual depiction of hyperspace travel is found in Dune (published in 1965). In the Dune milieu, space is folded using a complicated distortion technology. Travel is nearly instantaneous but very dangerous because of the extremely complex calculations required, compounded by the fact that computers are forbidden by religious decree. Mutated Guild Navigators (employees of the Spacing Guild) megadose on an addictive substance called melange from the planet Arrakis (also known as Dune), the unique properties of which enhance the humans' nascent ability to see into the future and fully comprehend the underlying nature of the universe. It is this prescient ability that allows them to see a safe passage and guide the ships safely through folded space. The Spacing Guild and also whoever controls Arrakis holds a monopoly and wields great power in the Dune universe as a result. Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... In the Dune universe, Guild Navigators are humans, mutated through high consumption of the spice melange, who are safely able to navigate interstellar space in a Heighliner. ... Look up Melange in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Universe is defined as the summation of all particles and energy that exist and the space-time in which all events occur. ... The Spacing Guild is a fictional organization in Frank Herberts Dune universe created in a series of science fiction novels starting in Dune and ending with Chapterhouse Dune. ... A monopoly (from the Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service, in other words a firm that has no competitors in its industry. ...


Instrumentality of Mankind series Cordwainer Smith

In the short stories of Cordwainer Smith (written in the 1950s and 1960s), FTL travel can be accomplished through a hyperspace known as Space2. Cordwainer Smith – pronounced CORDwainer Smith – was the pseudonym used by American author Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger (July 11, 1913 – August 6, 1966) for his science fiction works. ...


During the early eras of interstellar travel, crossing open space far from a star presented an incomprehensible danger: ordinary lifeforms, even protected within a hull environment, would die horribly for no apparent cause. Initially, this danger was met with the creation of the Habermen (humans, usually criminals, given cyborg modifications which removed their self-identity) and the Scanners (elite volunteers who underwent a modified form of the Haberman process and served as ship's officers), who could survive whatever this unknown threat was unharmed. They would crew STL light sail ships, while the passengers were kept in suspended animation. Later it was determined that if a large number of living organisms (clams, specifically) were used as a 'living shield', organisms further inward could survive unharmed. A cyborg is a cybernetic organism (i. ... Solar sails (also called light sails, especially when they use light sources other than the Sun) are a proposed form of spacecraft propulsion. ... Suspended animation is the slowing of life processes by external means without termination. ...


With the discovery of Space2 and the 'planoform' drive, the cause of this mysterious threat was finally determined: living entities, sometimes referred to as 'dragons', which existed in Space2 and fed on life energies. Since these creatures were disrupted and killed by bright physical light, they avoided the areas near stars. Thus, the practice of 'pinlighting' developed: ships would be accompanied by smaller vessels piloted by genetically engineered telepathic housecats, who, guided by human telepaths on-board the ships, would attack the creatures (which they perceived as enormous rats) with miniature nuclear flares.


Aside from this, and the strange effects of the first attempts to travel through Space2 (and later, Space3), little is known about the planoform drive.


Star Trek

Main articles: Warp drive and subspace

The Star Trek (first broadcast 1966) universe equivalent of hyperspace is known as subspace. Although similar in concept to hyperspace, subspace plays a slightly different role in FTL travel. Subspace exists in layers, all of which are "below" normal three-dimensional spacetime much like the different layers of a cake. When a starship is traveling at FTL speeds (commonly known as "warp" in the Star Trek universe), the ship itself does not enter subspace. Instead, the ship either reacts a steady stream of deuterium and anti-deuterium together, or else taps the massive energy of an artificial quantum singularity in order to power large subspace field-generating coils ("warp engines"). The field (known as a warp field) extends into subspace, allowing the enclosed starship to travel at FTL speeds while it remains within an inner sphere of normal spacetime (similar in concept to a 20th century hydrofoil). Wrapping a spaceship within the warp field prevents the relativistic time dilation normally associated with standard FTL travel, and allows interstellar travel to continue in a reasonable amount of time. This does not cite any references or sources. ... Screenshot (from SSCX Star Warzone). ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... In the Star Trek fictional universe, subspace is a feature of space-time which facilitates faster-than-light transit, in the form of interstellar travel or the transmission of information. ... In physics, spacetime is any mathematical model that combines space and time into a single construct called the space-time continuum. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Deuterium, also called heavy hydrogen, is a stable isotope of hydrogen with a natural abundance in the oceans of Earth of approximately one atom in 6500 of hydrogen (~154 PPM). ... For the physics of antimatter, see the article on antiparticles; for other senses of this term, see antimatter (disambiguation). ... In science fiction, the term quantum singularity is used to refer to many different phenomena, which often approximately resemble a gravitational singularity in the scientific sense in that they are massive, localized distortions of space and time. ... The Jetfoil Toppi is a ferry which connects Yakushima, Tanegashima Island and Kagoshima port in Japan. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to special relativity. ...


(Despite warp drive's incredible speed compared to current day travel speed, it can still take years to travel across a mere fraction of the galaxy, around a year per 1000 light years.)


Of course this concept of FTL travel is asymptotically limited by the idea that if the warp field is too strong, the ship itself will be too deeply submerged in subspace, which has negative genetic effects on living things. In addition, at high warp factors the energy required to sustain the field grows exponentially. In mathematics, exponential growth (or geometric growth) occurs when the growth rate of a function is always proportional to the functions current size. ...


Among the uses of subspace in Star Trek is as a medium for propagating audio and visual signals at FTL speeds, thus allowing nearly instantaneous communication across vast interstellar distances. This is commonly referred to in the Star Trek world as "subspace communication".


—In later Star Trek spin-offs, the main protagonists begin to experiment with unusual forms of FTL drives such as transwarp drive, soliton wave drive, wormholes, and even subspace.There are also similarities between the Hyperspace Drive of Star Wars and the Quantum Slipstream Drive of Star Trek Voyager. Also include in the Star Trek Voyager series is the use of the much fabled Warp factor 10 although in Earlier original season’s the Enterprise was able to travel at Warp drive 14.1 (That Which Survives), this was changed however for the Star Trek: The Next Generation series to be a maximum unattainable speed of 10. Every series such has followed suite except the Pre-series to the original Star Trek: The Original Series which being before the warp scale rearrangement, meant they still abide by that original scale. In Star Trek: Voyager episode Threshold, the speed of warp 10 is achieved with disastrous results. Crew member Tom Paris takes the Shuttlecraft Cochrane out to test his theory. He makes it back after disappearing off the sensors and tells of what he saw at warp 10. He was in every point in the universe at once. After this he begins to evolve into a anthropomorphic newt. The TransWarp drive allows a player to travel between distant sectors in the fictional TradeWars 2002 universe. ... In mathematics and physics, a soliton is a self-reinforcing solitary wave (a wave packet or pulse) that maintains its shape while it travels at constant speed; solitons are caused by a delicate balance between nonlinear and dispersive effects in the medium. ... Analogy to a wormhole in a curved 2D space (see Embedding Diagram) Artists impression of a wormhole as seen by an observer crossing the event horizon of a Schwarzschild wormhole, which is similar to a Schwarzschild black hole but with the singularity replaced by an unstable path to a... Slipstream is a science fiction term for a fictional method of faster-than-light space travel, similar to hyperspace travel, warp drive, or transfer points from David Brins Uplift series. ... For other uses, see Warp drive (disambiguation). ... Look up Enterprise in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... That Which Survives is a third season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast January 24, 1969 and repeated July 29, 1969. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... Look up Threshold in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Thomas Eugene Paris, played by Robert Duncan McNeill, is a fictional character in the Star Trek television series Star Trek: Voyager. ... Shuttlecraft of the USS Voyager (NCC-74656). ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... “Eft” redirects here. ...


Known Space

In the Known Space series first introduced in Ringworld (1970), hyperspace is a dimension in which (apparently) all objects move at a rate of 0.3 light years per terrestrial day relative to light moving in the physical universe. Prevailing theories hold that attempting to engage a hypershunt within the gravity well of a sufficiently large celestial body supposedly causes the drive (and possibly the ship) to careen wildly into an even 'higher' level of hyperspace, which cannot be reached normally and is thought to cause matter within the hyperspace field to disintegrate (though Niven revised this in a later work, Ringworld's Children; according to the new model, other-dimensional entities which exist near large masses consume ships which enter hyperspace in their vicinity). Because of this, the only species known to have developed hyperspace on their own are the Outsiders, a species whose biology is based on superfluid helium and who thus were more readily able and inclined to perform experiments in interstellar space. Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... Ringworlds Children is a 2004 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, the fourth in the Ringworld series set in the Known Space universe. ... The Outsiders are an alien race in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... Helium II will creep along surfaces in order to find its own level - after a short while, the levels in the two containers will equalize. ... General Name, Symbol, Number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 4. ...


When travelling within hyperspace, attempting to view anything outside of the ship (through a porthole or, as in the short story 'Flatlander', through a transparent hull) interacts with the human optic nerve such as to be perceived as a 'blind spot'; this effect is extremely unnerving to most people, and prolonged viewing can lead to madness.


(In this connection in "Combing Back Through Time" by Mike Atkinson, a 2006 'hard-sf' novella, quite the opposite visual outcome - albeit a recording - is had by the 360 degree view that a front mounted camera has, from a probe within a described "interspace" employed in 4th. dimensional movement or time travel.)


Space Battleship Yamato

In the animated series Space Battleship Yamato (first broadcast in 1974) and its sequels, spacetime is described as having a wave form in four or more spatial dimensions. By activating a 'wave motion drive' at a 'crest' in this wave, you can travel instantaneously to another point in space where a similar crest in the spacetime wave exists, allowing jumps across vast regions of space. Activating the drive at other points would result in the vessel being 'submerged' in subspace, remaining stationary but invisible; this is used by the antagonists of the series, the Gamelons, as a form of cloaking technology. Space Battleship Yamato ) is a Japanese science fiction anime series and the name of its eponymous space craft. ... A Klingon Bird of Prey from Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country fires while using a cloaking device In several science fiction universes, a cloaking device is an advanced stealth system which causes a spaceship or individual to be invisible and extremely difficult to detect with normal sensors. ...


Star Wars

The computer role-playing game Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic gives one of the more substantial explanations of how hyperspace travel works in the Star Wars universe. There are established safe hyperspace routes that were scouted out by an unknown species 25,000 years prior to the events in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977). These routes made interstellar trade and eventually the establishment of the Republic possible. New routes are almost never scouted out, mostly due to the fact that the end coordinates might place the traveling ship inside some star or planet. For example, the Deep Core Systems are especially hard to navigate because of the high density of stars. A pilot's skill in hyperspace has a lot to do with how he or she navigates the tangled web of hyperspace routes that criss-cross the galaxy. According to George Lucas, that is why Han Solo brags about the Millennium Falcon making the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs when a parsec is a measure of distance rather than time: apparently, his real gift is as a navigator (although in the Star Wars IV: A New Hope novel by Lucas, published in 1975, Solo says "she made the Kessel run in less than twelve Standard Time measures"). This appears to make no sense within the context of the original dialogue, however, as Solo's statement about the Falcon making the Kessel Run in under 12 parsecs was in response to Obi-Wan Kenobi saying, "If it's a fast ship." However, to get to Kessel, a ship must pass through The Maw, an incredibly dense cluster of black holes. To achieve a shorter distance, the ship must be moving faster, to avoid being sucked into a black hole. Traveling through hyperspace requires the aid of a Navi-Computer (Navigational Computer). Traveling through hyperspace is also apparently quite complex as Han Solo tells Luke that "It ain't like dustin' crops; boy". This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (KotOR) is an RPG video game originally for the Microsoft Xbox and later for PCs running Microsoft Windows. ... Star Wars is an epic space opera saga and a fictional universe initially developed by George Lucas during the 1970s and expanded since that time. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... // Events In the Academy Awards, Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight win Best Actor and Actress and Supporting Actress awards for Network. ... The Galactic Republic is the name of the interplanetary government used in the fictional Star Wars universe prior to the establishment of the Galactic Empire. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Han Solo is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... The Millennium Falcon is a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe commanded by smuggler Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and his Wookiee firstmate, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). ... The Kessel Run is a pathway from planet Kessel in the Star Wars galaxy used frequently by smugglers in the transport of precious Glitterstim spice. ... A parsec is the distance from the Earth to an astronomical object which has a parallax angle of one arcsecond. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi or Ben Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... // Kalakar VI was a volcanic moon of Dromund Kalakar in the Outer Rim. ... In the fictional Star Wars Expanded universe, The Maw is a seemingly unstable and mostly unnavigable cluster of black holes. ...


In any case, hyperspace is an extremely fast method of travel, as Obi-Wan and Luke Skywalker's journey from Tatooine to Alderaan is theorized to have only taken two days maximum, whereas these two planets are separated by half a galaxy or more. Darth Maul took approximately seven hours to travel from Coruscant to Tatooine. The movies, as well as multiple Expanded Universe sources, show hyperspace as having a mottled, blue-and-black appearance. An entry into hyperspace shows the stars stretch into starlines, then turn into the mottled appearance. Externally, a ship entering hyperspace is described in Timothy Zahn's novels as displaying a flicker of pseudomotion before disappearing. Like the above-mentioned Star Trek series, "holocomm" transmissions are featured in Star Wars as long-range, faster-than-light communications signals, sent through hyperspace. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... In the fictional Star Wars universe, Alderaan is the home of Princess Leia, Bail Organa and also, in 4000 BBY, Ulic Qel Droma who fought in the Great Sith War. ... Darth Maul is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Coruscant Coruscant (pronounced //) is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... Timothy Zahn (born September 1, 1951) is a science fiction novelist. ...


The hyperspace speed of a ship is represented by "class," an arbitrary and abstract measure. Lower numbers indicate proportionally lower travel time, and thus higher speed. For instance, an X-Wing happens to have class 1. The Death Star is class 3, which means it can travel through hyperspace only one-third as fast as the X-Wing. A more standard capital ship such as a Star Destroyer may clock in at class 2, and a civilian bulk freighter at class 4. Very fast ships, with class lower than 1, are relatively rare; the remarkably speedy Millennium Falcon is class 0.5, or twice as fast as the X-Wing. X-wing fighters on their way into battle in a still from Star Wars. ... The Death Star is a fictional planet-destroying superweapon as well as an enormous mobile military garrison in the Star Wars universe. ... A group of Imperial Star Destroyers. ...


Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy opens with the destruction of the planet Earth by Vogons in order to "make way for a hyperspace bypass". Hyperspace travel is not described very clearly, however. The general impression is that a ship travels for a short time along a bypass through an alternate dimension and emerges at its destination. The sensation of hyperspace travel is described by Ford Prefect as "unpleasantly like being drunk." When Arthur Dent asks why that is so bad, Prefect answers "You ask a glass of water." The experience is further described in the narrative as follows: The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... This is a list of races, fauna and flora featured in various incarnations of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... David Dixon as Ford Prefect in Episode One of the TV adaptation of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... Information Species Human Gender Male Age 30 (approx. ...

"At that moment, the bottom fell out of Arthur Dent's mind. His eyeballs turned inside out. His feet began to leak out the top of his head. The room folded flat about Arthur, spun around, shifted out of existence and left him sliding into his own navel."

It is at one point stated that one of the reasons for the development of the Infinite Improbability Drive is to allow people to cross vast interstellar distances quickly "without all that tedious mucking about in hyperspace". This was fitted to the starship 'Heart of Gold'. The Infinite Improbability Drive is a fictional faster-than-light drive in Douglas Adams The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series of books. ...


Macross and Robotech

In the Macross and also the Robotech universe, first introduced by the originial 1982 Chou Jikuu Yousai Macross TV series, hyperspace travel also involves the notion of space folding. Hyperspace folding involves a large hyperspace bubble around the vessel travelling through hyperspace. Everything within this bubble is transported along with the vessel itself to its destination. Thus when Captain Global/Gloval is forced into making a hyperspace fold from close to the surface of the earth and fold into behind the moon, an entire island, its sea, and its inhabitants are caught in the hyperspace bubble and accidentally transported to near Pluto's orbit along with the SDF-1 Macross. Elsewhere in the series, space folds looks as if the ship turns into a beam of energy which disappears as the ship goes into spacefold. The same happened in the 1994 Macross 7 TV series. In other entries in the Macross franchise, spacefolding seems to be a bit more conventional. For instance, in Macross Plus, Isamu Dyson and Yang Neumann travel to Earth in a Variable Fighter modified with a space fold drive. There, the fold process seems to look like an iridescent tunnel which the ship flies through. The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (Japanese: 超時空要塞マクロス, Chou Jikuu Yousai Macross) is an anime television series. ... Robotech science fiction and anime universe. ... Captain Bruno J. Global Bruno J. Global is the fictional captain of the SDF-1 Macross in the anime series The Super Dimension Fortress Macross. ... Adjectives: Plutonian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... The SDF-1 Macross is a fictional interstellar spacecraft from The Super Dimension Fortress Macross, an anime series that aired in Japan in 1982–1983, and its American adaptation Robotech (1985). ... Macross 7 ) is an anime television series. ... Macross Plus ) is a four-episode anime OVA and theatrical movie in the Macross series. ... Yang Neumann is a fictional character in the Macross universe. ...


The Voyage of the Star Wolf

An idea similar to hyperspace, called hyperstate, was introduced by David Gerrold in the novel The Voyage of the Star Wolf (1990). In this setting starships used artificially-produced gravitational singularities (the space-time distortions found at the center of black holes) to transition between normal space and so-called irrational space, where faster than light travel was possible. The primary limitation of hyperstate was that the resulting gravitational distortions could be easily detected by other starships, so stealthy movement at faster-than-light speeds was effectively impossible. David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... A gravitational singularity (sometimes spacetime singularity) is, approximately, a place where quantities which are used to measure the gravitational field become infinite. ... For other uses, see Black hole (disambiguation). ...


Babylon 5

In the television show Babylon 5 (1993-1998), hyperspace is treated as an alternate dimension where the distances between spatial bodies are significantly shorter. The primary energy expenditure in hyperspace travel is the act of "jumping" into hyperspace. While in hyperspace itself, ships use their normal propulsion systems and interstellar travel is enabled by the shortened distances. Ships must either use a jumpgate, which are artificial constructs that create a rift into hyperspace, or they can have their own jump-engine. The latter is restricted to large vessels, as opening a rift requires a staggering amount of power. Jump gates are used by larger vessels whenever possible, to save energy. Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... A typical Jump Gate. ...


Hyperspace in Babylon 5 is utterly featureless, with no points of reference. Therefore, ships have to use the hyperspace beacon system - a network of transmitters located in known points in realspace (usually jumpgates) - in order to navigate. If a ship travels off the beacon network, it will become lost in hyperspace. Babylon 5 is slightly unusual in that ships in hyperspace require no energy fields to protect themselves, so a ship that becomes lost in hyperspace can theoretically drift forever, and be rediscovered millennia later (this has been used as a plot point). Hyperspace also has currents, which will pull a disabled ship off the beacon network in a relatively short period of time.


While the hyperspace background appears to the naked eye to be a reddish/black, stormy environment, this is inconsistent with Babylon 5 science. The "Technomage Trilogy" states that hyperspace should have no color or other visual aspects. According to the trilogy, it has yet to be determined why the naked eye sees anything at all in hyperspace.


A jump point allowing entry into hyperspace from normal space is characterized by a yellow whirlpool, while jump points for ships emerging from hyperspace are characterized by a blue whirlpool. This is likely dependent on the design of the jump gate or jump engines, as Shadow vessels are seen entering and exiting hyperspace by appearing to simply fade away, and some of the other First Ones have other visual effects associated with hyperspace travel. Battles in hyperspace are infrequent and avoided; it appears that most such battles in history have ended disastrously for both sides. In the Babylon 5 fictional history, Earth acquired hyperspace technology from the Centauri who allowed humans use of their pre-existing jump gates. Earth used these already established jumpgates to explore the galaxy, and presumably later researched the ability to build their own jumpgates. By the 23rd century, larger Earth ships have the ability to create their own jump point without the use of a jump gate. No specific metric has ever been given to exact hyperspace distances in the Babylon 5 universe, and series creator JMS has stated on at least one occasion that distances are not linear.[citation needed] Earth In the Babylon 5 universe, Earth was located in a relatively uncontested portion of the Galaxy. ... Peter Jurasik as Londo Mollari in Babylon 5 The Centauri are a humanoid species in the fictional Babylon 5 universe. ... JMS may refer to: J. Michael Straczynski, contemporary fiction and television writer. ...


On a sidenote, in the spinoff series Crusade, there is a scene where the crew of the Excailbur encounter several large jellyfish like entities in hyperspace, resulting in one of the aliens attempting to mate with the ship.


Xenosaga

In the video game series Xenosaga (published 1998-present) for the PlayStation 2 console, people routinely travel long distances in space through hyperspace. Hyperspace in the Xenosaga universe is a realm of alternate space that looks like a long tube or column similar to a wormhole. In this space a starship can accelerate to faster than light speeds without experiencing the time dilation effects normally experienced when approaching the speed of light in normal space. Only spaceships equipped with a special force field can enter hyperspace, because exposure to hyperspace even for short period of time is hazardous to unprotected humans. In order to enter hyperspace a ship must go to a specific area in space known as a Column Area. Column Areas are places where ships can safely gate into and out of hyperspace. They can be found all over the universe and are separated by less than a day's travel at sub-light speeds. Navigating hyperspace requires entering a Column Area and finding a corresponding point within the universe-spanning navigation network known as the Unus Mundus Network (U.M.N.). The U.M.N. Transportation Gate management facility controls the use of Column Areas, and clearance must be granted before hyperspace can be entered. It has been suggested that List of Xenosaga cast members be merged into this article or section. ... “PS2” redirects here. ... Analogy to a wormhole in a curved 2D space (see Embedding Diagram) Artists impression of a wormhole as seen by an observer crossing the event horizon of a Schwarzschild wormhole, which is similar to a Schwarzschild black hole but with the singularity replaced by an unstable path to a... One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... A reference from the PS2 game series Xenosaga. U.M.N. Control Center on Second Miltia U.M.N., short for Unus Mundus Network, is an informational network that spans the entire universe. ...


Star Control II (computer game)

In Star Control II, hyperspace is depicted as a different plane of existence, that provides the means of feasible interstellar travel. Star Control II: The Ur-Quan Masters (officially II, often written as 2) was written by Toys for Bob (Fred Ford and Paul Reiche III) and originally published by Accolade in 1992 for PC; it was later ported to the 3DO with an enhanced multimedia presentation, allowed by the CD...


In SC2, the physical laws of hyperspace travel are slightly different than the travel in normal space: the ship travelling in hyperspace must continuously provide its own propulsion, or it stops (in normal space, propulsion is only needed to change the course).


Stars in the hyperspace are represented as gravity wells, which suck the ship into normal space when entering it too close.


SC2 also has a quasispace, which is even another plane of existence, of a different colour, and harder to access. The access points in quasispace lead into several different locations in the hyperspace. A dimension where distances between points in realspace are even shorter than in hyperspace. ...


Sword of the Stars

In the computer game Sword of the Stars, each race has it's own form of hyperspace, and therefore interstellar travel. Sword of the Stars is a space 4X game by small developer Kerberos Productions. ...


Humans, for example, utilize "Nodespace," a degenerate form of normal space formed by 'cracks' between areas of heavy gravity such as stars. In Nodespace distances are greatly reduced, allowing ships to use ordinary sublight propulsion and yet still cover distances that would require FTL propulsion if traveling in normal space. Without the special 'Bell Drive' nothing can cross between normal space and Nodespace, rendering traveling ships effectively invisible while in Nodespace, though they cannot see what they are traveling toward either. As well, Nodespace fractures form naturally and somewhat randomly, meaning that the shortest path between stars may still be somewhat circuitous.


The Hivers do not utilize any form of fast travel, instead employing Jumpgates to physically connect two or more points in space. Though it takes substantial amounts of time for a ship to travel between stars at sublight speeds, once a jumpgate is constructed within an intense gravity field it is essentially 'next to' all other jumpgates, allowing instant travel between any worlds in the network.


Liir ships can not use normal drives due to their special requirements (their ships are much more massive than normal due to having to be filled with water, and thus would require enormously larger amounts of power to move). They instead perfect a form of instantaneous teleportation allowing them to transport from one location to another without moving at all. Eventually they can teleport far enough and quickly enough to achieve 'speeds' that are effectively FTL over long distances.


The Tarkas are the only race to truly develop an FTL drive. Their ships fold space around them, allowing them to move at faster than light speeds.


Zuul Slavers, introduced in the expansion Born of Blood, utilize Nodespace in a similar manner to humans. Rather than exploiting natural Nodespace fractures, however, Zuul ships rip paths into Nodespace directly. This allows them to travel between stars as they wish, rather than being subject to the whims of nature. However, these artificial fractures are unstable and must be continually reinforced or they will collapse, destroying any matter in them at the time. As Zuul and Humans both use Nodespace in their travel, they may actually contact or intercept each other while in transit.


Frontier universe

The Frontier universe of space trading/combat games Frontier: Elite II and First Encounters depicts a rather classic type of hyperspace: traversing several light years through hyperspace jumps takes days or weeks, depending on the type of vessel and hyperdrive. For the player, this time passes instantaneously. The jumps consume fuel in direct proportion to the distance traveled and the (empty) mass of the vessel. The destination is always some distance away from large masses in the target star system - in systems of one medium-sized star (such as Sol), typically around 10 astronomical units; more in systems with a large white star or multiple stars. Elite is a seminal space trading-game, originally published by Acornsoft in 1984 for the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron computers and subsequently ported to many others. ... First Encounters is a video game released in 1995. ... A light-year or lightyear (symbol: ly) is a unit of measurement of length, specifically the distance light travels in vacuum in one year. ... A star system or stellar system is a small number of stars that orbit each other,[1] bound by gravitational attraction. ... Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... For the British white cider, see White Star (cider) The White Star is a fictional, medium-sized combat spacecraft type employing a mix of Vorlon and Minbari technology in the science fiction television series Babylon 5. ...


A hyperspace cloud is created in the entry and exit points. These can be analyzed by those wishing to intercept and destroy the jumping ship, as a faster ship can reach the destination sooner. Sometimes, more often with engines that have not been maintained properly, mis-jumps occur, which leave the player in interstellar space, where the ship will be forever stranded if sufficient fuel to reach a star system is not available (sub-light drive cannot be used to reach nearby stars, even if this were physically feasible). The interstellar medium (or ISM) is the name astronomers give to the tenuous gas and dust that pervade interstellar space. ...


Due to the danger of mutations caused by the powerful engines, hyperspace jumps are impossible (due to built-in restrictions in the engines) near large populations (around 15 kilometers from an inhabited planet's surface or any large space station). It has been suggested that mutant be merged into this article or section. ...


The Culture

In The Culture Series by Iain M Banks, hyperspace is an energy grid underlying the universe that separates it from its smaller antimatter twin. In the book Consider Phlebas it is described as being viewed from a ship as it flies through Hyperspace as a "vast and glittering ocean seen from a great height. The sun burning on a billion tiny wavelets." It is then described as having a smooth black blanket of cloud, which is suspended high above the ocean. The reader is then told to keep the sparkle of the sea despite the fact that there is no sun. The cloud is then described as to have "many sharp and tiny lights, scatterd on the base of the inky overcast like glinting eyes: some singular some in pairs, or in larger groups". The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Consider Phlebas is a science fiction novel by Scottish writer Iain M. Banks, first published in 1987. ...


All ships with hyperspace capabilities fly through by finding traction with its engine fields on. The irregularities in the grid that are the waves, while the Sparkles on the ocean are the ships source of power, while the sharp lights on the cloud are stars. Black holes are described as being like water spouts.


Ships are ordinarily unable to enter hyperspace whilst in a strong gravity well, however facing destruction during the Culture/Indiran war of Consider Phlebas, a Culture Mind not only manages to navigate a gravity well, but also exits hyperspace within the confines of a subsurface tunnel network.


Early Video Games

Early video games in which hyperspace was featured include Asteroids and Defender along with its sequel Defender II (aka Stargate). This was a way of escaping danger by having your ship vanish and reappear in a random area on the play screen. However, there was always the chance that the player's ship would reappear in a more dangerous spot. Defender and Defender II had a bug in which a ship could explode upon re-emerging from hyperspace. It was explained away as having the ship rematerialize in the same space as an enemy ship or missile. Asteroids is a popular vector-based video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari. ... Defender is a horizontally-scrolling shoot em up arcade game created by Williams Electronics in 1980. ... This article is about the 1980s Stargate video game. ...


Others

This section has been identified as trivia. ... Original run April 3, 1998 – April 23, 1999 No. ... The Stones of Blood is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 28 to November 18, 1978. ... For the term used in science-fiction, see Core worlds. ... Map of the Honorverse. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... Stargate Atlantis is a Canadian-American science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise. ... Space Runaway Ideon ), also known as Legendary Giant God Ideon, is an anime television series produced by Sunrise. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... Halo is video game series created by Bungie Studios. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... Slipspace travel, also called slipstream travel, is a fictional means of faster-than-light travel used by spaceships. ... Descent: Freespace Screenshot Freespace 2 Screenshot Descent: FreeSpace is a space simulation computer game series developed by Volition Inc. ... For the movie adaptation, see A Wrinkle in Time (film) . A Wrinkle in Time is a childrens fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle, written between 1959 and 1960[1] and published in 1962 after at least 26 rejections by publishers[2] because it was, in LEngles words... Madeleine LEngle (b. ... Sonic X ) is an animated television series, featuring video game hero Sonic the Hedgehog based on the storylines of the Sonic Adventure series. ... For the science fiction film, see Event Horizon (film). ... The Animorphs logo Animorphs is an English language science fiction series of young adult books written by K. A. Applegate and published by Scholastic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Gene Roddenberrys Andromeda is an American science fiction television series, based on unused material by Gene Roddenberry developed by Robert Hewitt Wolfe, and produced posthumously by his widow, Majel Roddenberry. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Other forms of Hyperspace

Other forms of hyperspace usually have the same properties, however, some allow travel throughout time as well as space (eg the Time Vortex). Popular names include warpspace, slipspace and subspace. Time portal created by The Pastmaster by using his magical pocketwatch. ... Slipspace travel, also called slipstream travel, is a fictional means of faster-than-light travel used by spaceships. ... Screenshot (from SSCX Star Warzone). ...


Slipspace is a method of travelling faster-than-light in the television series Andromeda. According to the show, a Gravity Field Generator drastically reduces the mass of the ship and then a slipstream drive opens a slippoint which the ship enters. The pilot then navigates the series of slipstream "tunnels" until they reach the desired slippoint where they exit the slipstream. Slipspace has the unusual property that it cannot be navigated by machine-based intelligence, however advanced. Only organic sentient beings are capable of selecting the correct path.


Interspace (see also a footnote above under "Known Space Series", Niven) In "Combing Back Through Time" by Mike Atkinson, this is used to step a visual history recording probe through the fourth dimension.


References

  • Surfing through Hyperspace: Understanding Higher Universes in Six Easy Lessons (Oxford University Press) by Clifford A. Pickover
  • The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality (Knopf) by Brian Greene
  • Hyperspace A Vanishing Act by P. Hoiland
  • http://www.astronomycafe.net/anthol/scifi2.html

Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension (1994) is a book by Michio Kaku, a theoretical physicist from the City College of New York. ... Professor Michio Kaku Michio Kaku (born January 24, 1947 in the United States) is a theoretical physicist, tenured professor, and co-creator of string field theory, a branch of string theory. ... Clifford A. Pickover is an author, editor, and columnist in the fields of science, mathematics, and science fiction. ...

See also


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