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A hyperlink, is a reference or navigation element in a document to another section of the same document or to another document that may be on a (different) website. For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... This article is about determination of position and direction on or above the surface of the earth. ... In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ... For the similarly-named Surrealist journal, see Documents (journal). ... Look up section in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML...

Embedded link

An embedded link is a link embedded in an object such as hyper text or a hot area. Example: The first word of this sentence is an "example" of an embedded link. In strictly mathematical branches of computer science the term object is used in a purely mathematical sense to refer to any thing. While this interpretation is useful in the discussion of abstract theory, it is not concrete enough to serve as a primitive datatype in the discussion of more concrete... Look up Example in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Hot area

A hot area (image map in HTML) is an invisible area of the screen that covers a text label or graphical images. A technical description of a hot area is a list of coordinates relating to a specific area on a screen created in order to hyperlink areas of the image to various destinations, disable linking via negative space around irregular shapes, or enable linking via invisible areas. For example, a map of the world may have each irregular shaped country hyperlinked to further information about that country. A separate invisible hot area interface allows for swapping skins or labels within the linked hot areas without repetitive embedding of links in the various skin elements. In HTML, an image map is a list of coordinates relating to a specific image, created in order to hyperlink areas of the image to various destinations (as opposed to a normal image link, in which the entire area of the image links to a single destination). ... Image of the Wikimedia Commons logo. ... An electronic page is a term to encompass the grouping of content between basic breaking points in documents that originate or remain as visual electronic documents. ... In computing, skins and themes are custom graphical appearances (GUIs) that can be applied to certain software and websites in order to suit the different tastes of different users. ...


Inline link

An inline link displays remote content without the need for embedding the content. The remote content may be accessed with or without the user selecting the link. Inline links may display specific parts of the content (e.g. thumbnail, low resolution preview, cropped sections, magnified sections, description text, etc.) and access other parts or the full content when needed, as is the case with print publishing software. This allows for smaller file sizes and quicker response to changes when the full linked content is not needed, as is the case when rearranging a page layout. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The ThumbsPlus image file manager showing folder tree in the upper left and 12 thumbnail-size images to the right. ... Image resolution describes the detail an image holds. ... In computing, a preview may be where output of a particular document, page, film, etc. ... Cropping refers to the removal of the outer parts of an image to improve framing, accentuate subject matter or change aspect ratio. ... Magnification is the process of enlarging something only in appearance, not physical size. ... Adobe InDesign CS2, one of many popular desktop publishing applications. ... Desktop publishing, or DTP, is the process of editing and layout of printed material intended for publication, such as books, magazines, brochures, and the like using a personal computer. ...


Random accessed

Random-accessed linking data are links retrieved from a data base or variable containers in a program when the retrieval function is from user interaction (e.g. dynamic menu from an address book) or non-interactive (e.g. random, calculated) process.


Hardware accessed

A hardware-accessed link is a link that activates directly via an input device (e.g. keyboard, microphone, remote control) without the need or use of a graphical user interface. An input device is a hardware mechanism that transforms information in the external world for consumption by a computer. ...


Hyperlinks in various technologies

Hyperlinks in HTML

Tim Berners-Lee saw the possibility of using hyperlinks to link any unit of information to any other unit of information over the Internet. Hyperlinks were therefore integral to the creation of the World Wide Web. Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...


Links are specified in HTML using the <a> (anchor) elements. In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ...


XLink: Hyperlinks in XML

Main article: XLink

The W3C Recommendation called XLink describes hyperlinks which offer a far greater degree of functionality than those offered in HTML. These extended links can be multidirectional, linking from, within, and between XML documents. It also describes simple links which are unidirectional and therefore offer no more functionality than hyperlinks in HTML. The XML Linking Language, or XLink, is an XML markup language used for creating hyperlinks within XML documents. ... The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—recommendations, as they call them—for the World Wide Web. ... The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—recommendations, as they call them—for the World Wide Web. ... The XML Linking Language, or XLink, is an XML markup language used for creating hyperlinks within XML documents. ...


Hyperlinks in other technologies

Hyperlinks are used in the Gopher protocol, e-mails, Text editors, PDF documents, word processing documents, spreadsheets, Apple's HyperCard and many other places. Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ... It has been suggested that Eddress be merged into this article or section. ... Notepad is the standard text editor for Microsoft Windows A text editor is a piece of computer software for editing plain text. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Word processing, in its now-usual meaning, is the use of a word processor to create documents using computers. ... A document is a writing that contains information. ... A spreadsheet is a rectangular table (or grid) of information, often financial information. ... Apple Inc. ... HyperCard was an application program from Apple Computer that was among the first successful hypermedia systems before the World Wide Web. ...


How hyperlinks work in HTML

A link has two ends, called anchors, and a direction. The link starts at the source anchor and points to the destination anchor. A link from one domain to another is said to be outbound from its source anchor and inbound to its target. An inbound link is a hyperlink transiting domains. ...


The most common destination anchor is a URL used in the World Wide Web. This can refer to a document, e.g. a webpage, or other resource, or to a position in a webpage. The latter is achieved by means of a HTML element with a "name" or "id" attribute at that position of the HTML document. The URL of the position is the URL of the webpage with "#attribute name" appended — this is a fragment identifier. // Uniform Resource Locator (URL) formerly known as Universal Resource Locator, is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: In popular usage and many technical documents, it is a synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI); Strictly, the idea of a uniform syntax for global identifiers of network-retrievable... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... A webpage or web page is a page of the World Wide Web, usually in HTML/XHTML format (the file extensions are typically htm or html) and with hypertext links to enable navigation from one page or section to another. ... In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ... A fragment identifier is a short string of characters that refers to a resource that is subordinate to another, primary resource. ...


When linking to PDF documents from an HTML page the "attribute name" can be replaced with syntax that references a page number or another element of the PDF, for example page=[pageNo] - "#page=386".


Link behavior in web browsers

A web browser usually displays a hyperlink in some distinguishing way, e.g. in a different colour, font or style. The behaviour and style of links can be specified using the Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) language. An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... A font can mean: A member of a typeface family; or digital font - file format that encapsulates a typeface family in a database. ... “Font” redirects here. ... In web development, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in a markup language. ...


In a graphical user interface, the appearance of a mouse cursor may change into a hand motif to indicate a link. In most graphical web browsers, links are displayed in underlined blue text when not cached, but underlined purple text when cached. When the user activates the link (e.g. by clicking on it with the mouse) the browser will display the target of the link. If the target is not an HTML file, depending on the file type and on the browser and its plugins, another program may be activated to open the file. Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... A blinking text cursor. ... For other uses, see Hand (disambiguation). ... This article is about the computer term. ... A file format is a particular way to encode information for storage in a computer file. ... For other uses, see Plug in. ...


The HTML code contains some or all of the five main characteristics of a link:

  • link destination ("href" pointing to a URL)
  • link label
  • link title
  • link target
  • link class or link id

It uses the HTML element "a" with the attribute "href" (HREF is an abbreviation for "Hypertext REFerence"[1]) and optionally also the attributes "title", "target", and "class" or "id": Anchor text is the visible text in a hyperlink. ... In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ... In web development, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in a markup language. ...

<a href="URL" title="link title" target="link target" class="link class">link label</a>

Example: To embed a link into a Page, blogpost, or comment, it may take this form:

<a href="http://www.wikipedia.org">Wikipedia</a>

Thus, the complex link string is reduced to, [Wikipedia]. This contributes to a clean, easy to read text or document.


When the cursor hovers over a link, depending on the browser and/or graphical user interface, some informative text about the link can be shown:

  • It pops up, not in a regular window, but in a special hover box, which disappears when the cursor is moved away (sometimes it disappears anyway after a few seconds, and reappears when the cursor is moved away and back). Mozilla Firefox, IE, Opera, and many other web browsers all shows the URL.
  • In addition, the URL is commonly shown in the status bar.

Normally, a link will open in the current frame or window, but sites that use frames and multiple windows for navigation can add a special "target" attribute to specify where the link will be loaded. Windows can be named upon creation, and that identifier can be used to refer to it later in the browsing session. If no current window exists with that name, a new window will be created using the ID. For other uses, see Window (disambiguation). ... Levitation is the process by which an object is suspended against gravity, in a stable position, by a force without physical contact. ... Firefox redirects here. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer abbreviated MSIE), commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... An example of a status bar A status bar is a component (widget) often found at the bottom of windows in a graphical user interface. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Creation of new windows is probably the most common use of the "target" attribute. In order to prevent accidental reuse of a window, the special window names "_blank" and "_new" are usually available, and will always cause a new window to be created. It is especially common to see this type of link when one large website links to an external page. The intention in that case is to ensure that the person browsing is aware that there is no endorsement of the site being linked to by the site that was linked from. However, the attribute is sometimes overused and can sometimes cause many windows to be created even while browsing a single site.


Another special page name is "_top", which causes any frames in the current window to be cleared away so that browsing can continue in the full window.


History of the hyperlink

The term "hyperlink" was coined in 1965 (or possibly 1964) by Ted Nelson at the start of Project Xanadu. Nelson had been inspired by "As We May Think," a popular essay by Vannevar Bush. In the essay, Bush described a microfilm-based machine (the Memex) in which one could link any two pages of information into a "trail" of related information, and then scroll back and forth among pages in a trail as if they were on a single microfilm reel. The closest contemporary analogy would be to build a list of bookmarks to topically related Web pages and then allow the user to scroll forward and backward through the list. Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Theodor Holm Nelson is an American sociologist, philosopher, and pioneer of information technology. ... Project Xanadu was founded by Ted Nelson in 1960 as the original hypertext project. ... Vannevar Bushs essay As We May Think, first published in The Atlantic Monthly in July 1945, argued that as humans turned from war, scientific efforts should shift from increasing physical abilities to making all previous collected human knowledge more accessible. ... Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... The memex was a theoretical analog computer described by the scientist and engineer Vannevar Bush in the 1945 The Atlantic Monthly article As We May Think. The word was a portmanteau of memory extender. Bush described the device as electronically linked to a library and able to display books and...


In a series of books and articles published from 1964 through 1980, Nelson transposed Bush's concept of automated cross-referencing into the computer context, made it applicable to specific text strings rather than whole pages, generalized it from a local desk-sized machine to a theoretical worldwide computer network, and advocated the creation of such a network. Meanwhile, working independently, a team led by Douglas Engelbart (with Jeff Rulifson as chief programmer) was the first to implement the hyperlink concept for scrolling within a single document (1966), and soon after for connecting between paragraphs within separate documents (1968). See NLS. Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Dr. Douglas C. Engelbart (born January 30, 1925 in Oregon) is an American inventor of German descent. ... Johns F. (Jeff) Rulifson (born August 20, 1941) is a computer scientist largely known for his involvement at the Augmentation Research Center, at then-named Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International) in implementing the On-Line System (NLS), a system that foreshadowed many future developments in modern computing and networking. ... A programmer or software developer is someone who programs computers, that is, one who writes computer software. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NLS workstation showing the CRT display, keyboard, pushbuttons, and mouse NLS, or the oNLine System, was a revolutionary computer collaboration system designed by Douglas Engelbart and the researchers at the Augmentation Research Center (ARC) at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) during the 1960s. ...


Legal issues

See also: Deep linking

While hyperlinking among pages of Internet content has long been considered an intrinsic feature of the Internet, some websites have claimed that linking to them is not allowed without permission. Deep linking, on the World Wide Web, is the act of placing on a Web page a hyperlink that points to a specific page or image within another website, as opposed to that websites main or home page. ...


In certain jurisdictions it is or has been held that hyperlinks are not merely references or citations, but are devices for copying web pages. In the Netherlands, for example, Karin Spaink was initially convicted of copyright infringement for linking, although this ruling was overturned in 2003. The courts that advocate it see the mere publication of a hyperlink that connects to illegal material to be an illegal act in itself, regardless of whether referencing illegal material is illegal. The term jurisdiction has more than one sense. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... For the thoroughbred, see Citation (horse). ... Karin Spaink (born December 20, 1957 in Amsterdam) is a journalist, writer and feminist. ... Look up publication in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 2000, British Telecom sued Prodigy claiming that Prodigy infringed its patent (U.S. Patent 4,873,662 ) on web hyperlinks. After litigation, a court found for Prodigy, ruling that British Telecom's patent did not cover web hyperlinks. [2] BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ... Prodigy Communications Corporation (Prodigy Services Corp. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ...


When linking to illegal or infringing copyrighted content the law of linking liability is currently considered a grey area. There are examples where sites have been proven liable such as Plaintiff Intellectual Reserve vs Utah Lighthouse Ministry, Universal City Studios, Inc. v. Reimerdes, and Comcast vs. Hightech Electronics Inc [3], and there are examples where sites have not been proven liable for linking, for example Perfect 10 v. Google Inc. Perfect 10 v. ...


See also

Object hyperlinking is a neologism that refers to extending the Internet to objects and locations in the real world. ... For advice on use of links in editing Wikipedia specifically, see Wikipedia:Manual of Style (links). ... In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ... Xenu, or Xenus Link Sleuth, is a computer program that checks websites for broken hyperlinks. ...

References

  1. ^ Tim Berners-Lee, Making a Server ("HREF" is for "hypertext reference")
  2. ^ CNET News.com, Hyperlink patent case fails to click. August 23, 2002.
  3. ^ WebTVWire.com, Linking to Infringing Video is probably Illegal in the US. December 10, 2006.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ...

External links

  • - Why a link is called hyperlink
  • UCSC Instructional Computing: Linking to Specific Pages in a PDF File - an excellent reference that outlines syntax and provides examples for linking to and controlling the way a PDF link opens.
  • Fact vs. Fiction: A Look at Link Building Ethical link building is a vital component to improve a website's rankings.
  • Anatomy and Deployment of Links - an in-depth guide to hyperlinks
  • Links & Law - Overview of legal issues and court rulings involving linking
  • Inlink Checker - A simple tool for determining who links to a particular URL

  Results from FactBites:
 
XHyperLink - yet another hyperlink control - The Code Project - Miscellaneous Controls (588 words)
XHyperLink is a simple drop-in hyperlink control with optional parent notification.
Recently I needed a hyperlink that would send a notification to the parent dialog.
This makes sense where the hyperlink only sends a notification to the parent window, but does not navigate.
Hyperlink - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1404 words)
A hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference in a hypertext document to another document or other resource.
Hyperlinks are used in PDF documents, word processing documents, spreadsheets, Apple's HyperCard and many others.
The term "hyperlink" was coined in 1965 (or possibly 1964) by Ted Nelson at the start of Project Xanadu.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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