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Encyclopedia > Hyperdrive

Hyperdrive is a name given to certain methods of traveling faster than light (FTL) in science fiction. Related concepts are jump drive and warp drive. Hyperdrive is a British television science fiction sitcom produced by the BBC created under the working title of Set in 2151 (the same year as the first season of Star Trek: Enterprise), it follows the crew of HMS Camden Lock as they stumble through their heroic mission to protect British... For other uses, see Faster than the speed of light (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jump drive is a name given to a method of traveling faster than light in science fiction. ... For other uses, see Warp drive (disambiguation). ...


The idea of hyperdrive in most science fiction relies on the existence of a separate and adjacent dimension most commonly called "hyperspace," though various other names have been used: "Drivespace," "The Immaterium," "slipspace," "Space2," "subspace," "Zero-space," etc. When activated, the hyperdrive shunts the starship into this other dimension, where it can cover vast distances in an amount of time greatly reduced from the time it would take in "real" space. Once it reaches the point in hyperspace that corresponds to its destination in real space, it re-emerges. Usually, hyperdrive refers to a method of travel in which it takes a measurable amount of time to go from one point to another. When the distance is covered instantaneously, the term jump drive is often used. Scene from Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope depicting the inside of the Millenium Falcon when entering hyperspace. ... Star*Drive is a science fiction campaign setting that was published in 1998 by TSR, Inc. ... The Immaterium (also referred to as the Empyrean or Warp) is an alternate dimension in the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe. ... Gene Roddenberrys Andromeda is an American science fiction television series, based on unused material by Gene Roddenberry developed by Robert Hewitt Wolfe, and produced posthumously by his widow, Majel Roddenberry. ... This page is about the book series. ... One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... Jump drive is a name given to a method of traveling faster than light in science fiction. ...


Fictional explanations of why ships can travel faster than light in hyperspace vary. Distances in hyperspace may be smaller than or geometrically inverse in relation to real space; it may provide a shortcut between two points in real space, thus effectively increasing the ship's speed by reducing distance travelled rather than time taken; perhaps the speed of light in hyperspace is not a speed barrier as it is in real space. Whatever the reasoning, the general effect is that ships traveling in hyperspace seem to have broken the speed of light, appearing at their destinations much quicker and without the shift in time that the Theory of Relativity would suggest. Technobabble (a portmanteau of technology and babble) is a form of prose using jargon, buzzwords and highly esoteric language to give an impression of plausibility through mystification and misdirection. ... Two-dimensional analogy of space-time curvature described in General Relativity. ...

Contents

Characteristics

While in hyperspace, spaceships are typically isolated from the normal universe; they cannot communicate with nor perceive things in real space until they emerge. Often there can be no interaction between two ships even when both are in hyperspace. To people traveling in hyperspace, time typically moves at its normal pace, with little or no time dilation; 24 hours in hyperspace equates to 24 hours in real space. One exception is David Brin's Uplift Universe; here, hyperspace is divided into "levels" where time passes at different rates. Hyperspace itself may be portrayed as swirling colors, total blackness, featureless gray, or as something that would drive a human mind insane should it be viewed. Time dilation is the phenomenon whereby an observer finds that anothers clock which is physically identical to their own is ticking at a slower rate as measured by their own clock. ... Glen David Brin, Ph. ... The Uplift Universe is a fictional universe created by science fiction writer David Brin. ...


In much science fiction, hyperdrive jumps require a considerable amount of planning and calculation, with any error carrying a threat of dire consequences. Therefore, jumps may cover a much shorter distance than would actually be possible so that the navigator can stop to "look around" -- take his bearings, plot his position, and plan the next jump. The time it takes to travel in hyperspace also varies. Travel times may be in hours, days, weeks or more.


Hyperdrives allow for drama in science fiction by eliminating the single biggest problem with space as a setting for a story: the vast majority of space is empty and thus more or less uninteresting. As in most depictions of hyperspace ships with hyperdrive can typically only interact with other ships while in "normal space", they would have to drop out of hyperspace to interact, and the chance of two ships appearing at the same location in deep space to take a navigation bearing at the same time is infinitesimal. Therefore, hyperdrive ships will encounter each other most often around contested planets or space stations, which can be light-years apart. Hyperdrive may also allow for dramatic escapes as the pilot "jumps" to hyperspace in the midst of battle to avoid destruction. Dramatic tension can also be evoked by the use of "Jump Calculations" in the same way. "Will the computer or crew be able to calculate the needed equations before being sucked into a black hole or before a group of missiles hits the ship?" Hyperspace also provides the means by which the literally astronomical distances between stars can be traversed in such a way that would enable an author to have a plot that deals with multiple star systems in a reasonable amount of time, something generally impossible if speeds less than the speed of light are observed. Authors that write about interstellar cultures without hyperdrives generally wind up with plots that last for centuries or more, something not all authors are willing to do. Infinitesimals have been used to express the idea of objects so small that there is no way to see them or to measure them. ...


In some science fiction, hyperspace travel is portrayed as potentially dangerous due to the chance that the route through hyperspace may take the ship too close to a celestial body with a large gravitational field, such as a star, or a black hole. In such scenarios, if a starship passes too close to a large gravitational field while in hyperspace, the ship is forcibly pulled out of hyperspace and reverts to normal space, or in some stories, is destroyed. Therefore, certain hyperspace "routes" may be mapped out that are safe, not passing too close to stars or other dangers. In some science-fiction universes, such as Star Wars, artificial gravity wells may be used to force another vessel to drop out of hyperspace. Other portrayals show less interaction between normal space and hyperspace, so that ships may actually pass through the position taken up by a celestial body in real space, without being affected. Given how critical transportation is to every human culture, it is unsurprising that in an interstellar culture, which must deal with distances orders of magnitude greater than terrestrial cultures, the unique ways in which interstellar travel is described in various fictional universes tends to create major plot elements in that universe.


Examples

Hyperdrives are the main FTL technology in many science fiction universes including:

Jack McDevitt (1935-) is an American science fiction author whose novels frequently deal with attempts to make contact with alien races and archaeology (or xenoarchaeology). ... Gene Roddenberrys Andromeda is an American science fiction television series, based on unused material by Gene Roddenberry developed by Robert Hewitt Wolfe, and produced posthumously by his widow, Majel Roddenberry. ... Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... This page is about the book series. ... K.A. Applegate is the author of the Animorphs, Remnants, and Everworld book series. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... Original run April 3, 1998 – April 23, 1999 Episodes 26 Movie: Knockin on Heavens Door (天国の扉) Director Shinichiro Watanabe Writer Keiko Nobumoto Studio Sunrise BONES Bandai Visual[2] Released {{{released}}} Runtime 115 min. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Descent: Freespace Screenshot Freespace 2 Screenshot Descent: FreeSpace is a space simulation computer game series developed by Volition Inc. ... Disgaea: Hour of Darkness (魔界戦記 ディスガイア; Makai Senki Disgaea, lit. ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American Jewish author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... EVE Online is a player-driven persistent-world massively multiplayer online game set in a science fiction space setting in which players pilot a wide array of customizable ships. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... Halos protagonist, the Master Chief. ... For the term used in science-fiction, see Core worlds. ... Honor Stephanie Harrington is a fictional character, the eponymous heroine of a series of science fiction books set in the Honorverse, written by David Weber and published by Baen Books. ... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ... Nick Frost as Henderson Kevin Eldon as York Hyperdrive is a British television science fiction sitcom produced by the BBC created under the working title of Set in 2151, it follows the crew of HMS Camden Lock as they stumble through their heroic mission to protect British interests in a... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos form a tetralogy of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Midshipmans Hope is a 1994 science fiction novel by David Feintuch, and the first book in the Seafort Saga. ... David Feintuch (July 7, 1944-March 16, 2006) was a science fiction and fantasy author and attorney. ... Norby is a fictional robot created by Isaac Asimov and Janet Asimov who stars in his own series of childrens science fiction books, The Norby Chronicles. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American Jewish author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The Star Control series is a trilogy of computer games with a cult following. ... Stargate Atlantis is an American-Canadian science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise owned by MGM. Developed by longtime SG-1 producers Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper, it is a spin-off from the television series Stargate SG-1. ... Brad Wright is probably best known as the co-creator and executive producer of the hit Sci-Fi Television Series Stargate SG-1 and Stargate: Atlantis. ... Robert C. Cooper is a Canadian writer and producer. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... Brad Wright is probably best known as the co-creator and executive producer of the hit Sci-Fi Television Series Stargate SG-1 and Stargate: Atlantis. ... Jonathan Glassner is a television writer, director, and producer. ... For other uses, see Starship Troopers (disambiguation). ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... This article is about the series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... The Cage is the original pilot episode of the original Star Trek science fiction series and resulting franchise. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ...

See also

Heim Theory - A controversial theory of physics that posits for a "real life hyperdrive". This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. ...


External links

  • Damn Interesting
  • New Scientist article
  • Sci Tech Today article
  • Hyperdrive Theory (Mathematics)
  • Space.com article

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hyperdrive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (733 words)
Hyperdrive is a name given to certain methods of traveling faster than light (FTL) in science fiction.
Usually, hyperdrive refers to a method of travel in which it takes a measurable amount of time to go from one point to another.
Hyperdrive may also allow for dramatic escapes as the pilot "jumps" to hyperspace in the midst of battle to avoid destruction.
Hyperdrive (TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1224 words)
Hyperdrive is a British television science fiction sitcom produced by the BBC created under the working title of "Full Power." Set in 2151, it follows the crew of HMS Camden Lock as they stumble through their heroic mission to protect British interests in a changing galaxy.
The series is written by Kevin Cecil and Andy Riley; the first episode was broadcast on BBC 2 on January 11, 2006.
Hyperdrive was shot entirely on Kodak Super 16mm film much to the insistence of director John Henderson after an initial 'test shoot' with digibeta video tape proved to be unsatisfactory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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