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Encyclopedia > Hyperbole

Hyperbole (pronounced /haɪˈpɝbəli/ or "hy-PER-buh-lee"; "HY-per-bowl" is a mispronunciation) is a figure of speech in which statements are exaggerated. It may be used to evoke strong feelings or to create a strong impression, and is not meant to be taken literally. In mathematics, a hyperbola (Greek literally overshooting or excess) is a type of conic section defined as the intersection between a right circular conical surface and a plane which cuts through both halves of the cone. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... A figure of speech, sometimes termed a rhetoric, or elocution, is a word or phrase that departs from straightforward, literal language. ...


Hyperbole is used to create emphasis. It is often used in poetry and is a literary device as well as a referendum. Bold and Boldface redirect here. ... This article is about the art form. ... Novels and short stories do not simply come from nowhere. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


Some examples include:

  • "He has a brain the size of a pea."
  • "I could eat a horse."
  • "I've heard that a million times."
  • "She is a hundred feet tall."

Antonyms to hyperbole include meiosis, litotes, and understatement. Look up Antonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Meiosis is a figure of speech which intentionally understates something or implies that it is less in significance, size, than it really is. ... In rhetoric, litotes is a figure of speech in which a speaker, rather than making a certain claim, denies its opposite; for example, rather than call a person attractive, one might say shes not too bad to look at. Litotes can be used to weaken a statement — Its... Understatement is a form of speech in which a lesser expression is used than what would be expected. ...


In show business and in the political arena, hyperbole (known as hype or media hype) is the practice of spending money on public relations, or expending political commentary in an attempt to bolster public interest in (for example) a movie, television show, performing artist,[1] politician, or proposed public policy. Often the entertainment or political value of the thing being hyped is exaggerated. Consequently, hype (but not traditional, literate hyperbole) has a bad connotation. Show business is a vernacular term for the business of entertainment. ... // The term Public Relations was first used by the US President Thomas Jefferson during his address to Congress in 1807. ...


In a similar tendency, it is difficult to distinguish where art and artists receive objective or hyperbolic praise, because of the subjective way that both art and artists are appreciated. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ...


Derived from the Greek ὑπερβολή (literally 'overshooting' or 'excess'), it is a cognate of hyperbola. In mathematics, a hyperbola (Greek literally overshooting or excess) is a type of conic section defined as the intersection between a right circular conical surface and a plane which cuts through both halves of the cone. ...


Bathos is the opposite of a hyperbole. Bathos is the 'let down' after a hyperbole in a phrase. For the Aarni album, see Bathos (album). ...


The modern slang term hype, in its usage as meaning extravagant publicity, may be derived from the word hyperbole. An example of the use of this slang term is in the 1988 song "Don't Believe the Hype" by the hip hop group Public Enemy. For other uses, see Slang (disambiguation). ... Dont Believe the Hype is the second single off of Public Enemys second album, It Takes a Nation of Million to Hold Us Back. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ...


The word is also incorrectly pronounced as "HY-per-bowl" in the song These Words by British artist Natasha Bedingfield. These Words (also known as These Words (I Love You, I Love You) and These Words (I Love You)) is a song by Natasha Bedingfield, and is the second European single (the first North American) from her debut album Unwritten. ... Natasha Anne Bedingfield (born 26 November 1981) is an English singer and songwriter who debuted in the 1990s as a member of the Christian dance/electronic group The DNA Algorithm with her siblings Daniel Bedingfield and Nikola Rachelle. ...


See also

Look up hyperbole in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Adynaton (from Greek: a-: without and dynasthai: to be possible) is a figure of speech in the form of hyperbole taken to such extreme lengths as to suggest a complete impossibility. ... Ironic redirects here. ... The Garter Group is an analyst/research house, based in the United States, that provides opinions, advice and data on the global information technology industry. ... In rhetoric, litotes is a figure of speech in which a speaker, rather than making a certain claim, denies its opposite; for example, rather than call a person attractive, one might say shes not too bad to look at. Litotes can be used to weaken a statement — Its... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... A simile is a comparison of two unlike things, typically marked by use of like, as, than, or resembles. Common examples are Curley was flopping like a fish on a line(extract of Mice and Men) etc. ... Technological hype is sensational promotion of technology. ... The term zillions can seriously mean all the possible -illions, as in million, billion, trillion, etc. ... INS agents recover Elián González by force from his uncles house; this photo, taken by AP photographer Alan Diaz won him a Pulitzer Prize. ...

References

  1. ^ Austin, Thomas (2002). Hollywood, hype and audiences: selling and watching popular film in the 1990s. Manchester: Manchester University Press, p. 45. ISBN 0-7190-5775-2. “Even in an era well used to the mechanisms of film ‘hype' — aggressive marketing, engineered controversy, press sensationalism” 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hyperbole at AllExperts (350 words)
Largely synonymous with exaggeration and overconsulting, hyperbole is a figure of speech in which statements are exaggerated or extravagant.
The antonym to hyperbole is understatement or meiosis (figure of speech).
In show business, hyperbole (known as hype or media hype) is the practice of spending money on public relations in an attempt to bolster public interest in (for example) a movie, television show, or performing artist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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