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Encyclopedia > Hymn

A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure. The word hymn derives from Greek ὕμνος hymnos "a song of praise", which itself is derived from the Proto-Indo-European stem *sh2em- "to sing" and is related to Hittite išḫamai "he sings" and Sanskrit sāman "song".[1] A hymn is a song specifically written as a song of praise, adoration or prayer, see Hymn. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term Deity in the context of mysticism and theology. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... Hittite is the extinct language once spoken by the Hittites, a people who created an empire centered on ancient Hattusas (modern BoÄŸazkale) in north-central Anatolia (modern Turkey). ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...


A writer of hymns is known as a hymnist or hymnodist, and the practice of singing hymns is called hymnody; the same word is used for the collectivity of hymns belonging to a particular denomination or period (e.g. "nineteenth century Methodist hymnody" would mean the body of hymns written and/or used by Methodists in the nineteenth century). A collection of hymns is called a hymnal. These may or may not include music. A student of hymnody is called a "hymnologist", and the scholarly or scientific study of hymns, hymnists and hymnody is hymnology. Hymnology is the scholarly study of religious song, or the hymn, in its many aspects, with particular focus on choral and congregational song. ...


Strictly speaking a hymn consists of words only, and the music to which a hymn may be sung is a hymn tune. For example, the hymn "Amazing Grace" is sung to the hymn tune NEW BRITAIN, and "Rock of Ages" is sung to TOPLADY. Many hymns are sung to several different hymn tunes; for example, "Lo! he comes, with clouds descending" is often sung to both HELMSLEY and ST. THOMAS. (It is a conventional practice to spell names of hymn tunes in capital letters, in small caps, or in italics, so as to differentiate them from hymn titles.) It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Hymn. ... For other uses, see Amazing Grace (disambiguation). ...


Ancient hymns include the Great Hymn to the Aten, composed by the pharaoh Akhenaten, and the Vedas, a collection of hymns in the tradition of Hinduism. The Western tradition of hymnody begins with the Homeric Hymns, a collection of ancient Greek hymns, the oldest of which were written in the 7th century BC in praise of the gods of Greek mythology. The Great Hymn to the Aten was found in the tomb of Ay, in the rock tombs at Akhetaten. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Akhenaten (disambiguation). ... The Vedas are part of the Hindu Shruti; these religious scriptures form part of the core of the Brahminical and Vedic traditions within Hinduism and are the inspirational, metaphysical and mythological foundation for later Vedanta, Yoga, Tantra and even Bhakti forms of Hinduism. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... The anonymous Homeric Hymns are a collection of ancient Greek hymns. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...

Contents

Christian tradition

Christian hymnody, originally modeled on the Psalms of David and other poetic passages ("canticles") in the scriptures, is generally directed as praise and worship to God. Many refer to Jesus either directly or indirectly. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Christian Hymns are often written with special or seasonal themes and these are used on holy days such as Christmas, Easter and the Feast of All Saints, or during particular seasons such as Advent and Lent. Others are used to instill reverence to the Bible or celebrate Christian practices such as the eucharist or baptism. Some hymns praise or address individual saints, particularly the Blessed Virgin Mary; such hymns are particularly prevalent in Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy and to some extent "High Church" Anglicanism. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... This article is about the Christian holiday. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ...


It is interesting to note that in most Evangelical churches, traditional songs are classified as hymns while more contemporary worship songs are not considered hymns. The reason for this distinction is unclear, but according to some it is due to the radical shift of style and devotional thinking that began with the Jesus movement and Jesus music. For the first century movement surrounding Jesus of Nazareth, see Early Christianity The Jesus movement was the major Christian element within the hippie counterculture, or, conversely, the major hippie element within the Christian Church. ... Jesus music, also known as gospel beat music in the United Kingdom, is a style of Christian music which originated on the West Coast of the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s as part of the Jesus movement before the Christian music industry had begun to take...


Accompaniment

Since the very earliest times, Christianity has incorporated the singing of "psalms and hymns and spiritual songs" (Matthew 26:30; 1 Corinthians 14:26; Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16; James 5:13; cf. Revelation 5:8-10; 14:1-5), either in private devotions, by the congregation or by a selected choir, often using various forms of accompaniment. In ancient and medieval times, stringed instruments such as the harp, lyre and lute were used with psalms and hymns. Modern hymnody accompanied on normal scales by a piano and/or organ ranging up to the symphony orchestra, share many elements with classical music, much of which had religious themes. Contemporary Christian worship, such as with Evangelicalism and Pentecostalism may include the use of electric guitars and the drum kit. Other Christian denominations, notably the Church of Christ (non-instrumental) and certain Reformed churches such as the Free Church of Scotland (Presbyterian), believe that the use of instruments in worship was only for the period before Christ came into the world, and adhere to a cappella congregational singing of hymns. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A typical accompaniment pattern of a Mozart concert or aria. ... A string instrument (also stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... “Lyres” redirects here. ... A medieval era lute. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ... This article is about the vocal technique. ...


The development of Christian hymnody

Thomas Aquinas, in the introduction to his commentary on the Psalms, defined the Christian hymn thus: "Hymnus est laus Dei cum cantico; canticum autem exultatio mentis de aeternis habita, prorumpens in vocem." ("A hymn is the praise of God with song; a song is the exultation of the mind dwelling on eternal things, bursting forth in the voice.") Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ...


Since there is a lack of musical notation in early writings, the actual musical forms in the early church can only be surmised. During the Middle Ages a rich hymnody developed in the form of Gregorian chant or plainsong. This type was sung in unison, in one of eight Church modes, and most often by monastic choirs. While they were written originally in Latin, many have been translated. A familiar hymn of this type is the 11th century plainsong Divinum Mysterium, (although the words Of the Father's Love Begotten date back to around the 4th century), that is a common part of church Christmas repertoires in the English language. Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


The Protestant Reformation produced a burst of hymn writing and congregational singing. Martin Luther is notable not only as a reformer, but as the author of many hymns including Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott (A Mighty Fortress Is Our God) which is sung today even in Roman Catholicism. Luther and his followers often used their hymns, or chorales, to teach tenets of the faith to worshipers. The earlier English writers tended to paraphrase biblical text, particularly Psalms; Isaac Watts followed this tradition, but is also credited as having written the first English hymn which was not a direct paraphrase of Scripture. Later writers took even more freedom, some included allegory and metaphor in their texts. Four part harmony also became the norm, rather than unison singing. Reformation redirects here. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Rare early printing of A Mighty Fortress. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Isaac Watts (July 17, 1674 – November 25, 1748) is recognised as the Father of English Hymnody, as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ...


Charles Wesley's hymns spread Methodist theology, not only within Methodism, but in most Protestant churches. He developed a new focus - expressing one's personal feelings in the relationship with God as well as the simple worship seen in older hymns. Wesley wrote: Charles Wesley (18 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ...

Where shall my wondering soul begin?
How shall I all to heaven aspire?
A slave redeemed from death and sin,
A brand plucked from eternal fire,
How shall I equal triumphs raise,
Or sing my great deliverer's praise.

Wesley's contribution, along with the Second Great Awakening in America led to a new style called gospel, and a new explosion of sacred music writing with Fanny Crosby, Ira D. Sankey, and others who produced testimonial music for revivals, camp meetings and evangelistic crusades. The Second Great Awakening  (1800–1830s) was the second great religious revival in United States  history and consisted of renewed personal salvation experienced in revival meetings. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Frances Jane Crosby (March 24, 1820 - February 12, 1915) usually known as Fanny Crosby, was one of the most prolific hymnists in history. ... Ira D. Sankey (1840-1908) was an American Gospel singer and composer associated with evangelist Dwight L. Moody. ...


African-Americans developed a rich hymnody from spirituals during times of slavery to the modern, lively black gospel style. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... == Historical background on spiritual music Spirituals were often expressions of religious faith, although they may also have served as socio-political protests veiled as assimilation to white, American culture. ...


The Methodist Revival of the eighteenth century created an explosion of hymnwriting in Welsh, which continued into the first half of the nineteenth century. The most prominent names among Welsh hymn-writers are William Williams Pantycelyn and Ann Griffiths. The second half of the nineteenth century witnessed an explosion of hymntune composition and choir singing in Wales. The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... William Williams William Williams, Pantycelyn (also known as Williams Pantycelyn, and Pantycelyn) (1717–January 11, 1791) is generally acknowledged as Waless most important hymn writer. ... Ann Griffiths (née Thomas, 1776-1805) was a Welsh poet. ... This article is about the country. ...


Some Christians today are using Christian lyrics in the rock music style although this often leads to some controversy between older and younger congregants. This is not new; the Christian pop music style began in the late 1960s and became very popular during the 1970s, as young hymnists sought ways in which to make the music of their religion relevant for their generation. Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ...


This long tradition has resulted in a rich lode of hymns. Some modern churches include within hymnody, the traditional hymn (usually addressed to God), praise choruses (often sung scripture texts) and gospel (expressions of one's personal experience of God). This distinction is not perfectly clear; and purists remove the second two types from the classification as hymns. It is a matter of debate, even sometimes within a single congregation, often between revivalist and traditionalist movements.


Well-known hymnists and hymns

Some Christian hymnists and their better-known hymns are:

Christian hymns, especially in more recent centuries, were often written in four-part vocal harmony. Today, except for choirs, more musically inclined congregations, and a cappella congregations, hymns are typically sung in unison. In some cases complementary full settings for organ are also published, in others, organists and other accompanists are expected to mentally transcribe the four-part vocal score for their instrument of choice. Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Pange Lingua is a hymn written by St. ... Verbum Supernum Prodiens is a Catholic hymn by St Thomas Aquinas. ... Eucharistic theology treats doctrines of the Holy Eucharist. ... Carl Gustaf Boberg How Great Thou Art lyricist Carl Boberg (August 16, 1859 – January 17, 1940) was a Swedish poet, writer and legislator best known for writing the Swedish Hymn O Store Gud. ... How Great Thou Art is: A famous hymn by Carl Boberg An album by Elvis Presley Category: ... Thomas of Celæno, also known as Thomas of Celano (around 1200 - around 1255), was a Franciscan monk and hymnodist whose chief claim to fame is his authorship of the Dies Iræ. Thomas was one of the first disciples of St Francis of Assisi and joined the order around 1215. ... For other uses, see Dies Irae (disambiguation). ... Portrait of William Cowper attributed to Romney. ... There is a Fountain Filled with Blood is a well-known hymn written by William Cowper. ... Frances Jane Crosby (March 24, 1820 - February 12, 1915) usually known as Fanny Crosby, was one of the most prolific hymnists in history. ... Blessed Assurance is a Christian hymn. ... Charlotte Elliott, March 18, 1789 - September 22, 1871 was an English poet and hymn writer. ... Paul Gerhardt (c. ... Paul Gerhardt, hymnist O Sacred Head, Now Wounded, a Christian Passion hymn, has been translated into at least two languages and is sung in numerous countries. ... Julia Ward Howe Julia Ward Howe (May 27, 1819 – October 17, 1910) was a prominent American abolitionist, social activist, and poet. ... The Battle Hymn of the Republic is a patriotic anthem, written by Julia Ward Howe in December 1861, that was made popular during the American Civil War. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Rare early printing of A Mighty Fortress. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Edward Mote was a pastor and hymn writer. ... John Newton John Newton (July 24, 1725 – December 21, 1807) was an an Anglican clergyman who had, at one time, been a slaveship master. ... For other uses, see Amazing Grace (disambiguation). ... Michael Saward, born in Blackheath in South East London, UK on 14th May 1932, grew up in Petts Wood, was educated at Eltham College, and became a practising Christian in 1946. ... Dan Schutte (Daniel L. Schutte) is a contemporary Christian hymnist best known for composing the hymn, This hymn, while popular in contemporary worship, is unusual in that it also has achieved some popularity for use in traditional services and is featured in some hymnals. ... Joseph Medlicott Scriven, 1820 - October 10, 1886 was a hymnist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... // Sonnet 29 by William Shakespeare begins with the speaker describing moments of great sadness, in which he cries over his outcast state by himself. ... Timothy Dudley-Smith (born 26 December 1926) is an English hymnwriter and clergyman of the Church of England. ... Beulah Land is a well-known gospel hymn written by Edgar Page Stites (1836-1921) in either 1875 or 1876. ... Theodulfus, Anglicised as Theodulph or Theodulfe, was Bishop of Orléans, a writer skilled in poetic forms and a learned theologian. ... Godfrey Thring (March 25, 1823–September 13, 1903), Anglican hymn writer // Born in Somerset, England, Son of Rev. ... Augustus Montague Toplady Augustus Montague Toplady (November 4, 1740 – August 11, 1778), was an Anglican clergyman and hymn-writer. ... ‘Rock of Ages’ is a popular Christian hymn by Reverend Augustus Montague Toplady. ... Isaac Watts (July 17, 1674 – November 25, 1748) is recognised as the Father of English Hymnody, as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. ... The hymn, When I Survey the Wondrous Cross, was written by Isaac Watts, and published in Hymns and Spiritual Songs in 1707. ... Joy to the World is one of the best-known and best-loved of Christmas carols. ... O God, Our Help in Ages Past, a hymn by Isaac Watts and William Croft, is considered to be one of the grandest in the whole realm of English hymnody. ... Charles Wesley (18 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... Christ the Lord Is Risen Today is a Christian hymn traditionally associated with Easter. ... Hark! The Herald Angels Sing is a Christmas hymn or carol written by Charles Wesley, the brother of John Wesley. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Love Divine, All Loves Excelling is a Christian hymn by Charles Wesley. ... O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing is a Christian hymn written by Charles Wesley. ... John Greenleaf Whittier (December 17, 1807 – September 7, 1892) was an American Quaker poet and forceful advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. ... Miriam Therese Winter (born 1938 as Gloria Winter in Passaic, New Jersey) is a Roman Catholic Medical Mission Sister, theologian and author of songs, e. ... Robert Lowry was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 12th March 1826. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ...


Hymn meters

Following Isaac Watts it has been common for English hymnody to use a conventionally named poetic meters to pair lyrics with melodies. The intention is that any words of a particular meter can be used with a tune of the same meter. The numbers in the following sections indicate the number of syllables per line in a tune, for example, 8.7.8.7 means that the first and third lines have 8 syllables, and the second and fourth lines have 7 syllables. Numeric specifications such as 8.7.8.7 or 87.87 (same thing) are often used in addition to the names below. The names below have an implied poetic foot, whereas numeric specifications don't, although some hymnals and psalm books differentiate, eg. "87.87" (which normally has Trochaic feet) and "87.87 (Iambic)" (which obviously has iambic feet). Meter (British English spelling: metre) describes the linguistic sound patterns of a verse. ... In verse, many meters use a foot as the basic unit in their description of the underlying rhythm of a poem. ... A trochee is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. ... An iamb or iambus is a metrical foot used in various types of poetry. ...


Those used the most often are:

  • C.M. - Common Meter; a quatrain (four-line stanza) with alternating lines of iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter, which rhymes in the second and fourth lines and sometimes in the first and third (8/6/8/6); also called Ballad Meter.
  • C.P.M. - Common Particular Meter; a six-line stanza of which the first, second, fourth and fifth lines are iambic tetrameter, and the third and sixth lines are iambic trimeter (8/8/6/8/8/6).
  • D. - Doubled; indicates an eight-line stanza instead of four, as in C.M.D. or D.C.M. - Common Meter Doubled or Doubled Common Meter, (8/6/8/6/8/6/8/6).
  • H.M. - Hallelujah Meter; a six-line stanza of which the first four lines are trimeter and the last two are tetrameter, which rhymes most often in the second and fourth lines and the fifth and sixth lines (6/6/6/6/8/8).
  • L.M. - Long Meter; a quatrain in iambic tetrameter, which rhymes in the second and fourth lines and often in the first and third (8/8/8/8).
  • L.P.M. - Long Particular Meter; a six-line stanza of iambic tetrameter (8/8/8/8/8/8).
  • M.T. (or 12s.) - Meter Twelves; a quatrain in anapestic hexameter (12/12/12/12).
  • P.M. - may stand for Psalm Meter (more commonly known as 8s.7s), Particular Meter, or Peculiar Meter (each indicating poetry with its own peculiar, non-standard, meter).
  • S.M. - Short Meter; iambic lines in the first, second, and fourth are in trimeter, and the third in tetrameter, which rhymes in the second and fourth lines and sometimes in the first and third (6/6/8/6).
  • S.P.M. - Short Particular Meter; a six-line stanza of which the first, second, fourth and fifth lines are iambic trimeter, and the third and sixth lines are iambic tertameter (6/6/8/6/6/8).
  • 8s. - Eights; used to distinguish an eight syllable quatrain that does not contain the iambic stress pattern characteristic of Long Meter (8/8/8/8).
  • 8s.7s. - Eights and sevens; a trochaic quatrain with alternating lines of four feet and three and one-half feet, which rhymes in the second and fourth lines and sometimes in the first and third (8/7/8/7); also called Psalm Meter.
  • 7s.6s. - Sevens and sixes; a quatrain with alternating lines of three and one-half feet and three feet, which rhymes in the second and fourth lines and sometimes in the first and third (7/6/7/6).

Media

Amazing grace. ... For other uses, see Amazing Grace (disambiguation). ... Meter (British English spelling: metre) describes the linguistic sound patterns of a verse. ... Medina is a census-designated place located in Zapata County, Texas. ... No file by this name exists, you can upload it File links The following pages link to this file: Amazing Grace ... For other uses, see Amazing Grace (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Woodworth. ... Just As I Am is one of the most well-known hymns of all time, popularized especially as an altar call song in the Billy Graham crusades. ... Image File history File links Toplady. ... Rock of Ages is a popular Christian hymn with lyrics by Reverend Augustus Montague Toplady, and music by Thomas Hastings. ... Image File history File links Eventide. ... Abide With Me is a well-known Christian hymn composed by Henry Francis Lyte in 1847, though the lyrics are usually sung to William Henry Monks melody Eventide rather than Lytes original music. ... Ein Feste Burg. ...

References

  1. ^ Watkins, Calvert (2000). The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, second edition, Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-618-08250-6. 

Calvert Watkins is a professor Emeritus of linguistics and the classics at Harvard University and professor-in-residence at UCLA. His doctoral dissertation was Indo-European Origins of the Celtic Verb I. The Sigmatic Aorist (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962), which deeply reflected the structuralist approach of Jerzy Kurylowicz...

See also

Hymnals are books of hymns sung by religious congregations. ... A List of Chinese Christian Hymn Books published between 1807-1912. ... A carol is a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character. ... A chorale was originally a hymn of the Lutheran church sung by the entire congregation. ... A doxology (from the Greek doxa, glory + logos, word or speaking) is a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian worship services, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ... A metrical psalter is a kind of Bible translation: a paraphrase of all or part of the Book of Psalms in vernacular poetry, meant to be sung as hymns in a church. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Worship music is a style of Christian music that is commonly used to denote songs that are used to worship God and set in a choral music style, usually with repeating, short, easily sung chorus parts. ... Shape notes are a system of music notation designed to facilitate congregational singing. ... Sacred Harp singing is a tradition of sacred choral music that took root in the Southern region of the United States. ... The oral tradition of the Vedas (Åšrauta) consists of several pathas, recitations or ways of chanting the Vedic mantras. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hymn Site of Lutheran Hymnal Com (465 words)
It seems everyone has a favorite hymn, many will be found here, but our focus is on the hymns found in Lutheran hymnals, and until we gather all of those, we are not considering anything else.
We have original hymn arrangements for organ, and for brass quintet - presented in midi.
We also have our contemporary hymn section, where original arrangements traditional hymns are done in folk, country western and rock styles.
Hymn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1410 words)
A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure.
A writer of hymns is known as a hymnist or hymnodist, and the practice of singing hymns is called hymnody; the same word is used for the collectivity of hymns belonging to a particular denomination or period (e.g.
The Western tradition of hymnody begins with the Homeric Hymns, a collection of ancient Greek hymns, the oldest of which were written in the 7th century BCE in praise of the gods of Greek mythology.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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