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Encyclopedia > Hyde Park, London
The Serpentine, viewed from the eastern end
Royal Parks of London

Coordinates: 51°30′31″N, 0°9′49″W Great Britain at the Olympics The United Kingdom competes in the Olympics as "Great Britain", even though this name is inaccurate as it omits to mention Northern Ireland. The British Olympic Association does not play as central a role in British sport as some other National Olympic Committees play in their nation's sporting life. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Hyde Park may mean: // Hyde Park, London, a Royal Park, the original and best known Hyde Park, Leeds, an inner-city area of north-west Leeds Hyde Park, South Yorkshire, a district of Sheffield. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (899x611, 61 KB) Summary Taken by User:Legalizeit in December 2003. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (899x611, 61 KB) Summary Taken by User:Legalizeit in December 2003. ... The Royal Parks of London are lands originally owned by the monarchy of England or the United Kingdom for the recreation of the royal family. ... Bushy Park in Autumn Bushy Park is the second largest of the Royal Parks of London. ... Green Park, London Green Park (officially The Green Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. ... One of the Royal Parks of London, Greenwich Park is a former deer-park in Greenwich and one of the largest single green spaces in south east London. ... This article is about the park in London. ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... A corner of the Isabella Plantation in Richmond Park Richmond Park is the largest of the Royal Parks in London. ... St. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


After the 2004 Summer Olympics Great Britain was fourth in the all-time Summer Olympic medal table, although the majority of the medals are accounted for by some very large tallies in the first few Olympic Games. British medal tallies for much of the post-war period were generally considered disappointing, but the 2000 Summer Olympics marked an upturn and this was sustained at the 2004 Summer Olympics when Great Britain finished tenth in the medal table. This was seen as a great success, and there was a victory parade through the streets of London. It was largely overlooked that the team had come fourth out of the five largest West European nations and had won less medals per capita than many other developed countries. The sports in which the British team has won most medals in recent Summer Olympics include rowing, sailing, cycling and athletics. London hosted the Summer Olympics in 1908 and 1948 and will do so again in 2012.


Winter sports only play a minor role British sporting life because the winters are not cold enough for them to be practised out of doors very much. Great Britain is not a leading nation at the Winter Olympics, but has had a few successes in sports such as figure skating and curling.


Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London, England and one of the Royal Parks of London, famous for its Speakers' Corner. For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate... The Royal Parks of London are lands originally owned by the monarchy of England or the United Kingdom for the recreation of the royal family. ... A Socialist Party of Great Britain member arguing against capitalism, October 31, 2004 Speakers Corner is an area where public speaking is allowed, and is located in the north-east corner of Hyde Park in London, England. ...


The park is divided in two by the Serpentine Lake. The park is contiguous with Kensington Gardens, which is widely assumed to be part of Hyde Park, but is technically separate. Hyde Park is 350 acres (1.4 km²) and Kensington Gardens is 275 acres (1.1 km²) giving an overall area of 625 acres (2.5 km²). The Serpentine is a lake in Hyde Park, London. ... This article is about the park in London. ...


The park was the site of The Great Exhibition of 1851, for which the Crystal Palace was designed by Joseph Paxton. The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851. ... The 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park . ... Sir Joseph Paxton (1803–1865) was an English gardener and architect of The Crystal Palace. ...


The park has become a traditional location for mass demonstrations. The Chartists, the Suffragettes and the Stop The War Coalition have all held protests in the park. A movement for social and political reform in the United Kingdom during the mid_19th century, Chartism gains its name from the Peoples Charter of 1838, which set out the main aims of the movement. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States, particularly in the years prior to World War I. The name was the Womens Social and Political Union (founded in 1903). ... February 15, 2003 was a global day of protests against the imminent invasion of Iraq. ...


On 20 July 1982 in the Hyde Park and Regents Park bombings, two bombs linked to the Provisional Irish Republican Army caused the death of eight members of the Household Cavalry and the Royal Green Jackets and seven horses. July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... -1... The Hyde Park and Regents Park Bombings occurred on July 20, 1982. ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican left-wing paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern Ireland... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... The Royal Green Jackets (RGJ) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, one of two within the Light Division (the other being The Light Infantry). ...

Contents

Grand Entrance

The Grand Entrance to Hyde Park
The Grand Entrance to Hyde Park

The Grand Entrance to the park, at Hyde Park Corner next to Apsley House, was erected from the designs of Decimus Burton. It consists of a screen of handsome fluted Ionic columns, with three carriage entrance archways, two foot entrances, a lodge, etc. The extent of the whole frontage is about 107 ft (33 m). The central entrance has a bold projection: the entablature is supported by four columns; and the volutes of the capitals of the outside column on each side of the gateway are formed in an angular direction, so as to exhibit two complete faces to view. The two side gateways, in their elevations, present two insulated Ionic columns, flanked by antae. All these entrances are finished by a blocking, the sides of the central one being decorated with a beautiful frieze, representing a naval and military triumphal procession. This frieze was designed by Mr. Henning, junior, the son of Mr. Henning who was well known for his models of the Elgin marbles. Download high resolution version (2246x1366, 182 KB)Grand entrance to Hyde Park - Project Gutenberg eText 13644 - http://www. ... Download high resolution version (2246x1366, 182 KB)Grand entrance to Hyde Park - Project Gutenberg eText 13644 - http://www. ... Hyde Park Corner is a place in London, England, at the south-east corner of Hyde Park. ... Apsley House in 1829 by TH Shepherd. ... Decimus Burton (30 September 1800-December 1881) was a prolific English architect and garden designer, particularly associated with projects in the classical style in London parks, including buildings at Kew Gardens and London Zoo, and with the layout and architecture of the seaside towns of Fleetwood and St Leonards on... Architects first real look at the Greek Ionic order: Julien David LeRoy, Les ruines plus beaux des monuments de la Grèce Paris, 1758 (Plate XX) The Ionic order forms one of the three orders or organizational systems of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and... --88. ...


The gates were manufactured by Messrs. Bramah. They are of iron, bronzed, and fixed or hung to the piers by rings of gun-metal. The design consists of a beautiful arrangement of the Greek honeysuckle ornament; the parts being well defined, and the raffles of the leaves brought out in a most extraordinary manner.


Sites of interest

Sites of interest in the park include Speakers' Corner (located in the northeast corner near Marble Arch) and Rotten Row which is the northern boundary of the site of the Crystal Palace. To the southeast is Hyde Park Corner. South of the Serpentine Lake is the Diana, Princess of Wales memorial, an oval stone ring fountain opened on 6 July 2004. A botanical sensation is the bizarre upside-down tree. Opposite Hyde Park corner stands one of the grandest hotels in London, The Lanesborough, which offers its top suite at £8,000 per night. A Socialist Party of Great Britain member arguing against capitalism, October 31, 2004 Speakers Corner is an area where public speaking is allowed, and is located in the north-east corner of Hyde Park in London, England. ... Marble Arch Marble Arch is a white Carrara marble monument near Speakers Corner in Hyde Park, at the western end of Oxford Street in London, England. ... Rotten Row from Hyde Park Corner Rotten Row is a broad track running along the south side of Hyde Park in London, leading from Hyde Park Corner to the west. ... Hyde Park Corner is a place in London, England, at the south-east corner of Hyde Park. ... The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain is a memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lanesborough is a prestigious 5* hotel on Hyde Park Corner in Knightsbridge, central London (postcode SW1), England. ...


Stanhope Lodge at Stanhope Gate, demolished to widen Park Lane, was the home of Samuel Parkes who won the Victoria Cross in the Charge of the Light Brigade. Parkes was later Inspector of the Park Constables of the Park and died in the Lodge on 14 November 1864. Samuel Parkes was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The photography for the Beatles album Beatles for Sale was taken at Hyde Park in autumn of 1964. The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. ... Beatles for sale by The Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label. ...


Concerts

The main Live 8 concert in Hyde Park on 2 July 2005
The main Live 8 concert in Hyde Park on 2 July 2005

Hyde Park has been the venue for some famous rock concerts, including those featuring Jethro Tull (1968), Blind Faith (1969), The Rolling Stones (1969), King Crimson (1969), Pink Floyd (1970), Grand Funk Railroad (1971), Roy Harper (1971), The Who (1996), Eric Clapton (1996), Bon Jovi (2003), Red Hot Chili Peppers (2004), Live 8 (2005), Queen and Paul Rodgers (2005) and the Foo Fighters (2006). Over 150,000 people attended Queen's concert in 1976 [1]. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 457 KB) Summary The stage of the Live 8 concert in London. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 457 KB) Summary The stage of the Live 8 concert in London. ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 (not to be confused with Live Aid) was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Blind Faith (disambiguation). ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... King Crimson are an influential English musical group founded by guitarist Robert Fripp and drummer Michael Giles in 1969. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... Grand Funk Railroad is an American power trio band. ... Roy Harper (born 12 June 1941), is an English singer-songwriter / guitarist who specialises in folk music. ... It has been suggested that Bob Pridden be merged into this article or section. ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer, who is one of the most successful musicians of the 20th century,[1] garnering an unprecedented three inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from New Jersey. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers (often refered to as Chili Peppers or simply RHCP) is a multiple Grammy Award-winning American rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1983. ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 (not to be confused with Live Aid) was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... // Formation Queen and Paul Rodgers started their collaboration in late 2004 when Queen was inducted into the UK Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... This article is about the band. ... Queen are an English rock band, formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ...


Hyde Park in fiction

In Volume II of Alan Moore's graphic novel, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, a character implies that Hyde Park is named in honour of Mr. Edward Hyde, the bestial alter ego of Dr. Henry Jekyll, the titular character(s) of Robert Louis Stevenson's novella, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This was a posthumous honour, done so to recognize Hyde's death while attempting to stop invaders from the planet Mars in their advance upon London (adapted from H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds). In this story, Hyde Park was originally named "Serpentine Park". Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic book limited series written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin ONeill, published under the Americas Best Comics imprint of DC Comics. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... The War of the Worlds (1898), by H. G. Wells, is an early science fiction novel (or novella) which describes an invasion of England by aliens from Mars. ...


In The Face of Evil (a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who), The Doctor is attempting to reach Hyde Park when he lands on an alien planet. The Face of Evil is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from January 1 to January 22, 1977. ... This is a list of Doctor Who television serials. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme (and a 1996 television movie) produced by the BBC. The programme shows the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor, who explores time and space in his TARDIS time ship with his companions, solving problems and... Doctor Who or, see History of Doctor Who. ...


Hyde Park is also the setting for Anne Perry's Victorian murder mystery, The Hyde Park Headsman in which several murder victims are found beheaded in or near the park under strange circumstances, causing near-hysterical terror in the residents of 1892 London. Superintendent Thomas Pitt is charged with discovering the murderer before he/she can strike again. Anne Perry (born October 28, 1938), born Juliet Hulme in England, is a British historical novelist and convicted murderer (see also Parker-Hulme Murder). ... Thomas Pitt Thomas Pitt (July 5, 1653 – April 28, 1726), born at Blandford Forum, Dorset, to a rector and his wife, was a British merchant involved in trade with India. ...


Hyde Park features as a setting in The Eye in the Door by British novelist Pat Barker. Chapter one in particular alludes to the Park's history as a gay cruising ground before the decriminalization of homosexuality in 1967. The Eye in the Door is a novel by Pat Barker, first published in 1993, and forming the second part of the Regeneration trilogy. ... Pat Barker (born May 8, 1943) is an English writer and historian. ... Gay cruising describes the act of searching about a public place in pursuit of a partner for sex. ...


It featured where Mark Darcy and Daniel Cleaver fight in the 2004 sequel to Bridget Jones Diary. Bridget Joness Diary is a 2001 film, based on the successful novel, also called Bridget Joness Diary, by Helen Fielding. ...


Also, In Destroy All Humans! 2, it is an area in Albion, a fictionalized London. Destroy All Humans! 2, known as Destroy All Humans! 2: Make War Not Love in Europe is a video game and sequel to Destroy All Humans!. It was released on October 17, 2006 in North America. ...


Transport

There are five London Underground stations located on or near the edges of Hyde Park - in clockwise order starting from the south-east: The London Underground is an electric railway system that covers much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ...

Hyde Park Corner is a London Underground station near Hyde Park Corner in Hyde Park. ... Knightsbridge tube station, Sloane Street entrance Knightsbridge is a London Underground station in Knightsbridge. ... Queensway is a London Underground station, just inside the boundary of the City of Westminster with the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. ... Entrance Lancaster Gate is a London Underground station located on Bayswater Road in Bayswater (City of Westminster), to the north of Kensington Gardens. ... Marble Arch is a London Underground station in the City of Westminster. ...

See also

The Artillery Memorial located in Hyde Park London is a memorial to the 49,000 men killed during world war two in the Royal Artillery Regiment. ... Wellington Arch, also known as Constitution Arch, is a triumphal arch located to the south of Hyde Park in central London. ...

References

  • Room, Adrian. Brewer's Names, Cassell, London, 1992. ISBN 0-304-34077-4

External links


Parks and open spaces in London

Addington Hills | Alexandra Park | Battersea Park | Brockwell Park | Burgess Park | Bushy Park | Cannizaro Park | Clapham Common | Clissold Park | Coram's Fields | Crystal Palace Park | Dulwich Park | Duppas Hill | Eel Brook Common | Epping Forest | Finsbury Park | Green Park | Greenwich Park | Hackney Marshes | Hampstead Heath | Hampton Court Park | Holland Park | Hornchurch Country Park | Hyde Park | Island Gardens | Jubilee Gardens, South Bank | Kennington Park | Kensington Gardens | Kilburn Grange Park | Lincoln's Inn Fields | London Fields | Mile End Park | Mitcham Common | Morden Hall Park | Morden Park | Osterley Park | Oxleas Wood | Parliament Hill | Parsons Green | Plumstead Common | Primrose Hill | Queen's Park | Regent's Park | Richmond Park | Kew Gardens | South Norwood Country Park | St. James's Park | Streatham Common | Tooting Commons | Trent Park | Valentines Park | Victoria Park | Victoria Tower Gardens | Wandsworth Common | Waterlow Park | West Ham Park | Wimbledon Park | Wimbledon and Putney Commons | Wormwood Scrubs London is well endowed with open spaces. ... Addington Hills is a park located in Upper Shirley, London. ... An avenue in the park lined with lime trees Alexandra Park is a large landscaped park in the London Borough of Haringey in Greater London. ... Battersea Park peace pagoda The bandstand in Battersea Park The cover of Petula Clarks 2001 box set, Meet me in Battersea Park Battersea Park is a 200 acre (0. ... Brockwell Park is a 128. ... Categories: UK geography stubs | London parks and commons ... Bushy Park in Autumn Bushy Park is the second largest of the Royal Parks of London. ... Cannizaro Park is a park in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... Clapham Common Clapham Common is a triangular area of grassland of about 200 acres (0. ... Clissold Park is a popular community park located in Stoke Newington within the London Borough of Hackney. ... Corams Fields is a large open space in the London borough of Camden. ... Crystal Palace has a number of meanings: The Crystal Palace was a Victorian iron and glass building, originally in Hyde Park, London for the Great Exhibition, and subsequently rebuilt in south London. ... , Dulwich Park is a 29 hectare (72 acre) park in Dulwich in the London Borough of Southwark. ... Duppas Hill is at Croydon in Surrey. ... Eel Brook Common is a park in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, close to Fulham Broadway Tube. ... Epping Forest is an area of ancient woodland in south-east England, straddling the border between north-east Greater London and Essex. ... Finsbury Park is a place in London, at the junction of the London Boroughs of Islington, Haringey and Hackney. ... Green Park, London Green Park (officially The Green Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. ... One of the Royal Parks of London, Greenwich Park is a former deer-park in Greenwich and one of the largest single green spaces in south east London. ... Hackney Marshes holds the world record for the highest number (88) of full-sized football pitches in one place. ... Hampstead Heath (locally known as The Heath) is a public open space in the north of London. ... Hampton Court Park – sometimes called the Home Park – is adjacent to Hampton Court Palace and Gardens in southwest London. ... Holland Park is a district and a public park in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in west central London in England. ... Hornchurch Country Park is a park on the former site of Hornchurch Airfield, south of Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering, East London. ... Island Gardens is a public park located at the southern end of the Isle of Dogs - hence the name Island - in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Jubilee Gardens was created in 1977 to mark the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II and sits at the heart of London’s cultural centre, South Bank. ... Kennington Park is in Kennington, London, England, in London SE11, and lies between Kennington Park Road and St Agnes Place. ... This article is about the park in London. ... Kilburn Grange Park is a 3. ... Lincolns Inn Fields is the largest public square in London. ... London Fields at twilight. ... Mile End Park is a park located in London. ... A footpath near the golf corse. ... Morden Hall Park is a small National Trust park located in Morden on the banks of the river Wandle. ... Morden Park is an area within the district of Morden in the London Borough of Merton, and includes the Park itself, an area of green space in an otherwise dense cluster of 1930s suburban housing. ... Osterley House with Stable Block to right Design for the entrance facade of Osterley House by Robert Adam A design for one of the walls of the Estruscan dressing room at Osterly Park by Robert Adam. ... Parliament Hill is an open area of in north-west London adjacent to Hampstead Heath administered by the Corporation of London. ... Parsons Green is a park in the Parsons Green area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... Plumstead Common is a common in Plumstead, in the London Borough of Greenwich, south-east London. ... Primrose Hill. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... A corner of the Isabella Plantation in Richmond Park Richmond Park is the largest of the Royal Parks in London. ... “Kew Gardens” redirects here. ... South Norwood Country Park is a park in South Norwood, close to Elmers End station, in the London Borough of Croydon. ... St. ... Streatham Common is a large open space on the southern edge of Streatham. ... The Tooting Commons consist of two adjacent areas of common land lying between Balham, Streatham and Tooting, in south west London - Tooting Bec Common and Tooting Graveney Common. ... Mansion at Trent Park The Trent Park mansion houses the Trent Park campus of Middlesex University in North London. ... Valentines Park is the largest (125 acres) green space in the London Borough of Redbridge, between Ilford and Gants Hill. ... The Bathing Pond in Victoria Park. ... Victoria Tower Gardens is a public park along the north bank of the River Thames in London. ... Wandsworth common is a common in Battersea, south London. ... View across the park Waterlow Park is a 26 acre (105,000 m²) park to the south east of Highgate Village, in North London, England. ... West Ham Park is a public park in the London Borough of Newham. ... Wimbledon park is the second biggest park in the whole of the london borough of merton, it was renovated in the year 2001, with the help of the local council and the local millionnaire [Gemini Murthen]. The facilities provided within the park is ideal for the people living around it... The windmill on Wimbledon Common in February 2005 A map of Wimbledon common from 1944 Wimbledon and Putney Commons consist of a large open space in south-west London comprising 1140 acres (4. ... Wormwood Scrubs is a place in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in west London. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hyde Park, London - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (959 words)
Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London and one of the Royal Parks of London.
Parkes was later Inspector of the Park Constables of the Park and died in the Lodge on 14 November 1864.
Hyde Park is also the setting for Anne Perry's Victorian murder mystery, The Hyde Park Headsman in which several murder victims are found beheaded in or near the park under strange circumstances, causing near-hysterical terror in the residents of 1892 London.
Victorian London - Entertainment and Recreation - Parks, Commons and Heaths - Hyde Park (7266 words)
Hyde Park, long the favourite resort of the fashionable world, is an extremely beautiful and very delightful spot, embracing in extent an area of 395 acres, in which the combination of hill and dale, wood and water, are so happily blended, as to pro duce, though not an extensive, a rich and varied landscape.
Hyde Park is much frequented as a promenade, particularly on Sundays, between the hours of two and six in the afternoon There are six entrances, five of which are adorned with neat modern lodges, and the sixth, at Hyde Park Corner, with a triumphal arch.
HYDE PARK, which derives its name from the Hyde, an ancient manor of the priory of Westminster, suppressed by Henry VIII., occupies an area of about 300 acres, and lies between Park Lane and Kensington Gardens, and is separated from the Green Park by Piccadilly.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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