FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Hussar" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hussar
A British Hussar from the Crimean War
A British Hussar from the Crimean War

Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok, Polish: Husaria) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. Some modern military units retain the title 'hussar' for reasons of tradition. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixels Full resolution (2892 × 3232 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixels Full resolution (2892 × 3232 pixel, file size: 1. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...

Contents

History

Light hussars

The word hussar (IPA: [hə.ˈzɑː], [hə.ˈsɑɹ]; or [hʊ-]) derives from the Hungarian huszár, which in turn comes from the Serbian husar ("highwayman", or brigand)[1], a type of irregular light horsemen, already well established by the 15th century. Initially they fought in small bands, but were reorganised into a strong, highly-trained and motivated formation during the reign of King Matthias I Corvinus of Hungary. Under his command the units took part in the war against the Ottoman Empire in 1485 and proved successful against the Turkish Spahis as well as Bohemians and Poles. After the king's death in 1490 many hussars fled to other Central and Western European countries and became the core of similar light cavalry formations created there. For instance, Austria hired Hungarian hussars as mercenaries for wars against the Ottoman Empire. Also Frederick the Great used hussar units extensively during the War of the Austrian Succession. Great Britain also hired German hussars among their Hessian mercenaries and sent them to America to fight in the American War of Independence. While light hussars were adopted by all European militaries to counter infantry and artillery, the most spectacular were the heavy hussars of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Matthias Corvinus (Mátyás in Hungarian), (February 23, 1443 (?) - April 6, 1490) was one of the greatest Kings of Hungary, ruling between 1458 and 1490. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ... Holzschnitt nach Melchior Lorch, 1646. ... Events Tirant Lo Blanc by Joanot Martorell, Martí Joan De Galba is published. ... An army unit consisting of mounted soldiers are commonly known as cavalry. ... A mercenary, is a person who takes part in an armed conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a Party to the conflict, material compensation substantially in excess of that... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Combatants Prussia Spain France Electorate of Bavaria Kingdom of Naples Austria Great Britain Dutch Republic Electorate of Saxony Sardinia Russian Empire Commanders Frederick II Leopold I Leopold II Maurice de Saxe François-Marie de Broglie Charles VII Ludwig Khevenhüller Charles Alexander George II Charles Emmanuel III Empress Maria... In mathematics, the Hessian matrix of a function of several real variables is the (symmetric) matrix of all second partial derivatives. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Heavy hussars

For more details on this topic, see Polish Hussars.
Polish (Winged) Hussar
Polish (Winged) Hussar

Initially the first units of Polish hussars in the Kingdom of Poland were formed by the Sejm (Polish parliament) in 1503, which hired three banners of Hungarian mercenaries. Quickly recruitment also began among Polish and Lithuanian citizens. Being far more maneuvrable than the heavily armoured lancers previously employed, the hussars proved vital to the Polish and Lithuanian victories at Orsza (1514) and Obertyn (1531). By the reign of King Stefan Batory the hussars had replaced medieval-style lancers in the Polish-Lithuanian army, and they now formed the bulk of the Polish cavalry. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Kingdom of Poland of the Jagiellons was the Polish state in the years between the death of Casimir III in 1370 and the Union of Lublin in 1569. ... The Sejm building in Warsaw. ... Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Mercenary (disambiguation). ... A Lancer was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ... The Battle of Orsha took place September 8, 1514, between the forces of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Kingdom of Poland (less than 30,000 troops), under the command of Hetman Konstanty Ostrogski, and the army of Muscovy under Konyushy (конюший, Tsars... Combatants Poland Principality of Moldavia Commanders Jan Amor Tarnowski Petru RareÅŸ Strength 4484 cavarly 1167 infantry 1143 firearms 12 cannon 17 000 cavarly 50 cannon Casualties 256 killed 7746 killed 1000 captured 50 cannon lost The Battle of Obertyn (September 22, 1531) was fought between Moldavian Prince Petru RareÅŸ and... For other persons of the same name, see Báthory. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ...

Commonwealth Hussar, wings visible. Painting by Aleksander Orłowski
Commonwealth Hussar, wings visible. Painting by Aleksander Orłowski

Over the course of the 1500s hussars in Hungary had become heavier in character: they had abandoned wooden shields and adopted plate metal body armour. When Stefan Batory, a Transylvanian-Hungarian prince, became king of Poland in 1576 he reorganized the Polish-Lithuanian hussars of his Royal Guard along Hungarian lines, making them a heavy formation, equipped with a long lance as their main weapon. By the 1590s most Polish-Lithuanian hussar units had been reformed along the same 'heavy' Hungarian model. These Polish 'heavy' hussars were known in their homeland as husaria. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Self-portrait Aleksander Orłowski (1777–1832) was a Polish painter and sketch maker, pioneer of litography in Russia. ... For other persons of the same name, see Báthory. ... Poland was ruled by dukes (c. ...


With the Battle of Lubieszów in 1577 the 'Golden Age' of the husaria began. Down to and including the Battle of Vienna in 1683, the Polish-Lithuanian hussars fought countless actions against a variety of enemies, and rarely lost a battle. In the battles of Byczyna (1588), Kokenhusen (1601), Kircholm (1605), Kłuszyn (1610), Trzciana (1629), Chocim (1673) and Lwów (1675), the Polish-Lithuanian hussars proved to be the decisive factor often against overwhelming odds. Events March 17 - formation of the Cathay Company to send Martin Frobisher back to the New World for more gold May 28 - Publication of the Bergen Book, better known as the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord, one of the Lutheran confessional writings. ... // For siege of Vienna in 1529 see Siege of Vienna Combatants Holy League: Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Austria, Saxony, Franconia, Swabia, Bavaria Ottoman Empire, Khanate of Crimea, Transylvania, Wallachia, Moldavia Commanders John III Sobieski, Charles V of Lorraine Kara Mustafa Pasha Strength 70,000, (10,000 during siege) 138,000, (200... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Combatants Poland Austria Commanders Jan Zamojski Maximilian III of Austria Strength 3700 cavalry, 2300 infantry 6000 infantry Casualties 1000 2000 The Battle of Byczyna took place on January 24 1588 between polish-lithuanian army of new elected polish king Sigismund III Vasa under command of hetman Jan Zamojski and austrian... Combatants Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Sweden Commanders Jan Karol Chodkiewicz, Grand Hetman of Lithuania Charles IX, King of Sweden Strength 1,300 infantry 2,500 cavalry 5 guns 9,000 infantry 3,000 cavalry 11 guns Casualties 100 dead 200 wounded 8,000 dead The Battle of Kircholm (September 27, 1605... Conflict Dymitriads - Polish-Muscovite War of 1609-1618 Date July 4, 1610 Place Village of Kluszyn, between Vyazma and Mozhaysk Result Polish victory The Battle of Kluszyn (Klushino) was fought on July 4th, 1610, between forces of the Russia during Russias Time of Troubles. ... Combatants Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Sweden Commanders StanisÅ‚aw Koniecpolski, Field Crown Hetman of Poland Gustav Adolf, King of Sweden Strength 1,300 hussars 1,200 light cavalry 2,000 reiters 4,000 cavalry 5,000 infantry Casualties 250 dead over 1,000 dead 500 captured The Battle of Trzciana (June... Khotin fortress overlooks the Dniester river Khotyn (Хотин, Polish: Chocim; Romanian: Hotin; Russian: Хотин, Khotin) is a town in the Chernivetska oblast of Ukraine. ... Battle of Lwów refers to a battle between the armies of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Turkey that took place near the city of Lwów (now Lviv) on August 24, 1675. ...


Until 18th century they were considered the elite of Commonwealth armed forces. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Hussars in Western Europe

Hussars outside of Eastern and Central Europe followed a different line of development. During the early decades of the 17th century hussars in Croatia ceased to wear metal body armour; and by 1640 most were now light cavalry. It was hussars of this 'light' pattern rather than the Polish heavy hussar that were later to be copied across Europe. These light hussars were ideal for reconnaissance and raiding sources of fodder and provisions in advance of the army. In battle, they were used in such light cavalry roles as harassing enemy skirmishers, overrunning artillery positions, and pursuing fleeing troops. Armour sucks ass alottttttttttt Armour was also commonly used to protect war animals, such as war horses and elephants. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... Fodder growing from barley In agriculture, fodder or animal feed is any foodstuff that is used specifically to feed domesticated livestock, including cattle, goats, sheep, horses, chickens and pigs. ... Skirmishers are infantry soldiers who are stationed ahead or to the sides of a larger body of friendly troops. ...


Following the example of Hungary, hussar regiments were introduced into many of the armies of western Europe in the late 17th and 18th centuries. Bavaria raised its first hussar regiment in 1688 and a second one about 1700. Prussia followed suit in 1721. France established a number of hussar regiments from 1692 on, recruiting originally from Hungary and Germany, then subsequently from German speaking frontier regions within France itself. Russia relied on its native cossacks to provide irregular light horse until 1741. Recruited largely from Christian Orthodox communities along the Turkish frontier, the newly raised Russian hussar units increased to 12 regiments by the Seven Years War. Spain disbanded its first hussars in 1747 and then raised a new unit, the Espanoles Hussar Regiment in 1795. Denmark had hussars from 1764 and Sweden introduced this class of cavalry about 1756. Britain converted a number of light dragoon regiments to hussars in the early nineteenth century. This article needs cleanup. ... This article is about the 1756–1763 war. ...


The Hussar Image

The colourful military uniforms of hussars from 1700 onwards were inspired by Hungarian fashions. US Marine Corps MARPAT uniform Military uniforms comprises standardised dress worn by members of the armed forces of various nations. ...


This uniform usually comprised a short jacket known as a dolman, or later a medium-length "attila" jacket, both with heavy horizontal gold braid on the breast, and yellow braided or gold Austrian knots (sújtás) on the sleeves; a matching pelisse (a short-waisted overjacket often worn slung over one shoulder); colored trousers, sometimes with yellow braided or gold Austrian knots at the front; a busby (kucsma) (a high fur hat with a cloth bag hanging from one side; although some regiments wore the shako (csákó) of various styles); and high riding boots. A braid Step by step creation of a basic braid using three strings To braid is to interweave or twine three or more separate strands of one or more materials in a diagonally overlapping pattern. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... An Austrian Knot (or Tyrolean Knot) is an elaborate design of twisted cord or lace worn as part of a dress uniform, usually on the lower sleeve. ... Busby is the English name for a military head_dress made of fur. ... A Shako of a French Navy uniform of the 19th century. ... Mexican cowboy boots custom made for Harry S. Truman. ...


European (but not British) hussars traditionally wore long moustaches (but no beards) and long hair, with two plaits hanging in front of the ears as well as a larger queue at the back. They often retained the queue, which used to be common to all soldiers, after other regiments had dispensed with it and adopted short hair. A plait is a knot usually tied from multiple lines and exhibiting a repeating pattern, often a braid and often referring to hair. ... Actor Jet Li wearing the Imperial Queue hairstyle in a movie The queue (or cue) was a specific hairstyle worn by the Manchus of central Manchuria and later the Chinese, in China. ...


Hussars had a reputation for being the dashing, if unruly, adventurers of the army. The traditional image of the hussar is of a reckless, hard-drinking, hard-swearing, womanising, moustachioed swashbuckler. Arthur Conan Doyle's character Brigadier Etienne Gerard of the French Hussards de Conflans has come to epitomise the hussar of popular fiction - brave, conceited, amorous, a skilled horseman and (according to Napoleon) not very intelligent. Brigadier Gerard's boast that the Hussards de Conflans (an actual regiment) could set a whole population running - the men away from them and the women towards them, may be taken as a fair representation of the espirit de corps of this class of cavalry. Edgar Allan Poe had a simple moustache. ... For other uses, see Swashbuckler (disambiguation). ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


Less romantically, 18th century hussars were also known (and feared) for their poor treatment of local civilians. In addition to commandeering local food-stocks for the army, hussars were known to also use the opportunity for personal looting and pillaging. In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... Looting (which derives via the Hindi lut from Sanskrit lunt, to rob), sacking, or plundering is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war [1], natural disaster [2], rioting [3], or terrorist attack...


Hussars of the Napoleonic Wars

French hussar from 1804
French hussar from 1804

The hussars were a prominent cavalry force in the Napoleonic wars (1796 - 1815). As light cavalrymen mounted on fast horses they would be used to fight skirmish battles and for scouting. Most of the great European powers used the hussar within their military forces. The armies of France, Austria, Prussia and Russia had included hussar regiments since the mid-18th century. In the case of Britain four light dragoon regiments were converted to hussars in 1805. Hussars were notoriously impetuous and Napoleon was quoted as stating that he would be surprised for a hussar to live beyond 30* due to their tendency to become reckless in battle, exposing their weaknesses in frontal assaults. The hussars of Napoleon created the tradition of sabrage, the opening of a champagne bottle with a saber, something that is still popular in France to this day. The uniform of the Napoleonic hussars was made up of the pelisse: a short cloak which was often worn slung over one shoulder and fastened with a cord. This garment had a fur edging and was extensively adorned with braiding (often gold or silver for officers) and several rows of multiple buttons. Under this was worn the dolman or tunic which also was decorated in braid. On active service the hussar normally wore reinforced breeches which had leather on the inside of the leg to prevent them from wearing due to the extensive riding in the saddle. On the outside of such breeches, running up the outside was a row of buttons, and sometimes a stripe in a different colour. In terms of headwear the common hussar wore either a shako or fur busby. The colours of dolman, pelisse and breeches varied greatly by regiment, even within the same army. The Napoleonic hussar was armed with a brass hilted sabre and sometimes with a brace of pistols although these were often unavailable. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 445 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (520 × 700 pixel, file size: 242 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Illustration du 8e régiment de hussards français en 1804. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 445 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (520 × 700 pixel, file size: 242 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Illustration du 8e régiment de hussards français en 1804. ... // Sabrage; Sabering the Champagne bottle. ... A Shako of a French Navy uniform of the 19th century. ... Busby is the English name for a military head_dress made of fur. ... It has been suggested that Cavalry saber be merged into this article or section. ...


A famous military commander in Bonaparte's army who began his military career as a hussar was Marshal Ney who after being employed as a clerk in an iron works joined the 5th Hussars in 1787. He rose through the ranks of the hussars in the wars of Belgium and the Rhineland (1794 - 1798) fighting against the forces of Austria and Prussia before receiving his marshal's baton in 1804 after the Emperor Napoleon's coronation.


* This comment was actually made by General Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, one of Napoleon’s cavalry commanders and himself a hussar, who said that “Any hussar who is not dead by the time he is thirty is a blackguard.” He was killed at the battle of Wagram on 6th July 1809, at the age of thirty-four.


Hussars in the early 20th Century

On the eve of World War I there were still hussar regiments in the British (including Canadian), French, Spanish, German, Russian, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Romanian and Austro-Hungarian armies. In most respects they had now become regular light cavalry, recruited solely from their own countries and trained and equipped along the same lines as other classes of cavalry. Hussars were however still notable for their colourful and elaborate parade uniforms, the most spectacular of which were those worn by the two Spanish regiments, Husares de Pavia and Husares de la Princesa. A characteristic of both the Imperial German and Russian Hussars was the variety of colours apparent in their dress uniforms. These included red, black, green, dark and light blue, brown and even pink (the Russian 15th Hussars) dolmans. Most Russian hussar regiments wore red breeches as did all the Austro-Hungarian hussars of 1914. This rainbow effect harkened back to the 18th century origins of hussar regiments in these armies. The fourteen French hussar regiments were an exception to this rule - they wore the same relatively simple uniform, with only minor distinctions, as the other branches of French light cavalry. This comprised a shako, light blue tunic and red breeches. The twelve British hussar regiments were distinguished by different coloured busby bags and a few other distinctions such as the yellow plumes of the 20th, the buff collars of the 13th and the crimson breeches of the 11th Hussars.


Hussar influences were apparent even in those armies which did not formally include hussar regiments. Thus both the Belgium Guides (prior to World War I) and the Mounted Escort of the Irish Defence Forces (during the 1930s) wore hussar style uniforms.


After horse cavalry became obsolete, hussar units were generally converted to armoured units, though retaining their traditional titles. Hussar regiments still exist today, in the British Army (although amalgamations have reduced their number to two only), the French Army, the Swedish Army (Livregementets husarer (Life Regiment Hussars)), the Dutch Army and the Canadian Forces), usually as tank forces or light mechanized infantry. The Danish Guard Hussars provide a ceremonial mounted squadron, which is the last to wear the slung pelisse. Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Alternative meanings: vehicle armour, Armor (novel) A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The French Army (French: Armée de Terre) is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Livregementets husarer, K 3 (Life Regiment Hussars, K 3) is one of Swedens oldest units originating from the cavalry prepared from Uppland, Södermanland, Västmanland, Närke and Värmland. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... Mechanized infantry are infantry equipped with armored personnel carriers (APCs), or infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) for transport and combat (see also mechanized force). ...


Armament and tactics

Hussars in battle at Hungarian Revolution of 1848.
Hussars in battle at Hungarian Revolution of 1848.

Hussar armament varied over time. Until the 1600s it included a cavalry sabre, lance, long wooden shield and, optionally, light metal armour or simple leather vest. Their usual form of attack was to make a rapid charge in compact formation against enemy infantry or cavalry units. If the first attack failed, they would retire to their supporting troops who re-equipped them with fresh lances, and then would charge again. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 561 pixelsFull resolution (1141 × 800 pixel, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Battle at Tápióbicske (1849. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 561 pixelsFull resolution (1141 × 800 pixel, file size: 224 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Battle at Tápióbicske (1849. ... The Hungarian Revolution of 1848 was one of many revolutions that year and closely linked to other revolutions of 1848 in the Habsburg areas. ... It has been suggested that Cavalry saber be merged into this article or section. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... A shield is a protective device, meant to intercept attacks. ... Armour sucks ass alottttttttttt Armour was also commonly used to protect war animals, such as war horses and elephants. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ...


Polish heavy hussars were much more heavily-armed. Apart from the Polish sabre and the lance, they were usually also equipped with two pistols, a small rounded shield and koncerz, a long (up to 2 metres) yet light sword used in charge when the lance was broken. Also the armour became heavier and with time it was replaced by shield armour. Szabla in general is the Polish generic term for a sabre. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... A koncerz is a kind of sword used by Polish horsemen in the renaissance period. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Unlike their lighter counterparts, the Polish hussars were used as a heavy cavalry for line-breaking charges against enemy infantry. The famous low losses were achieved by a unique tactics of late concentration. Until the first musket salvo of the enemy infantry, the hussars were approaching relatively slowly, in a loose formation. Each rider was at least 5 steps away from his colleagues and the infantry using still undeveloped muskets simply could not aim at any particular cavalryman. Also, if hussar's horse was wounded, the following lines had time to steer clear of him. After the salvo, the cavalry rapidly accelerated and joined up the ranks. At the moment of clash of the charging cavalry with the defenders, the hussars were riding knee-to-knee. Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... A salvo is the simultaneous discharge of artillery or firearms including the firing of guns either to hit a target or to perform a salute. ...


Hussars of the Polish Commonwealth were also famous for the huge 'wings' worn on their backs or attached to the saddles of their horses. There are several theories trying to explain the meaning of the wings. According to some they were designed to foil attacks by Tatar lasso; other theory has it that the sound of vibrating feathers attached to the wings made a strange sound that frightened enemy horses during the charge. However, recent experiments carried over by Polish historians in 2001 did not support any of the theories and the phenomenon remains unexplained. Most probably the wings were worn only during parades and not during combat, but this explanation is also disputed. Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ... Lariat redirects here. ...


Current hussar units

Argentina

The 'Regimiento de Húsares del Rey' was created in 1806 to defend Buenos Aires from the British 1806-1807 expeditions. After Revolution in 1810, it became the 'Regimiento Húsares de Pueyrredón' after its founder and first colonel, Juan Martín de Pueyrredón. Currently serves as a armor regiment--the 'RCT No 10 Húsares de Pueyrredón'--using its Revolutionary era uniforms in full regalia during formal parades.


Canada

Note: All Canadian hussar regiments are reserve force armoured reconnaissance units.

The 1st Hussars is an armoured militia regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces, currently based in London, Ontario and Sarnia, Ontario. ... 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louises) is an army reserve armoured reconnaissance regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The Royal Canadian Hussars (Montreal) (RCH) is a reserve armoured regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The Sherbrooke Hussars is a reserve armoured regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ...

Chile

During the Independence War (in the earlys 1800's)a patriot elite unit was named "Húsares de la Muerte" (Death's Hussars) commanded by the notorious chilean captain Manuel Rodríguez.


Denmark

  • Gardehusarregimentet (English: Guard Hussar Regiment). Founded in 1614, this is the oldest regiment of hussars in the world. It is a mixed armour/infantry unit with seven battalions. In addition to its operational role, the Guard Hussar Regiment is one of two regiments in the Danish Army (along with the Den Kongelige Livgarde) to be classed as 'Guards'; in this case, the Guard Hussars perform the same role as the Household Cavalry do in the British Army. In mounted parade uniform the Gardehusarregimentet are the only hussars to still wear the slung and braided pelise which was formerly characteristic of this class of cavalry.

The Gardehusarregiment (Guard Hussar Regiment) is one of two cavalry regiments of the Royal Danish Army. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... The Royal Danish Life Guards Den Kongelige Livgarde (Royal Life Guards) is an infantry regiment of the Royal Danish Army, formed in 1658. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings...

France

  • 1er Régiment de Hussards Parachutistes (1er RHP) (1st Hussar Parachute Regiment). Founded in 1720, currently stationed in Tarbes. Formerly the "Hussards de Bercheny", after the founder, Count Bercheny.
  • 2ème régiment de Hussards (2e RH) (2nd Hussar Regiment). Founded in 1735, currently stationed in Sourdun, Provins arrondissement. Traditionally called "Chamborant".
  • 3ème régiment de Hussards (3e RH) (3rd Hussar Regiment). Founded in 1764, currently stationed in Immendingen, Tuttlingen district, Germany. Part of the Franco-German Brigade. Formerly the "Hussards d'Esterhazy".
  • 4ème régiment de Hussards (4e RH) (4th Hussar Regiment). Founded in 1791, currently stationed in Metz.
  • Hussard noir (black hussar) was the nickname of primary teachers in the Third Republic because of their black coat.

// Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... Location within France Tarbes is a French town and commune, in the département of Hautes-Pyrénées, of which it is the préfecture. ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... Provins is a commune of France. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Tuttlingen is a town in Baden-Württemberg, capital of the district Tuttlingen. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ...

Netherlands

The Dutch word for hussar is huzaar (IPA: [hʊ.ˈzaːʁ]). Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ...

Except for the Huzaren Van Boreel, every regiment operates in the armoured role in one of the three mechanized brigades of the Dutch army, using the Leopard 2 main battle tank. Each of these brigades also has a squadron from the Huzaren Van Boreel attached for reconnaissance. The Regiment Huzaren Prins van Oranje is an armoured regiment of the Royal Netherlands Army, named after Prince Willem, Prince of Orange, eldest son of King Willem II. The regiment serves as part of 43 Gemechaniseerde (Mechanized) Brigade operating the Leopard 2 main battle tank. ... The Regiment Huzaren van Boreel is an armoured regiment of the Royal Netherlands Army, named for Willem Francois Boreel. ... The Regiment Huzaren Prins Alexander is an armoured regiment of the Royal Netherlands Army, named after Prince Alexander, the second son of King Willem II. The regiment serves as part of 41 Gemechaniseerde (Mechanized) Brigade operating the Leopard 2 main battle tank. ... The Regiment Huzaren Van Sytzama is an armoured regiment of the Royal Netherlands Army, named for Willem Hendrik Baron van Sytzama. ... The Royal Netherlands Army (Koninklijke Landmacht) is the land forces element of the Military of the Netherlands. ... The Leopard 2 is a German main battle tank built by the German company Krauss-Maffei-Wegmann, developed in the early 1970s and first entering service in 1979, replacing the earlier Leopard 1 as the foremost MBT in the Bundeswehr. ...


Peru

  • Regiment of Hussars of Junin. The regiment was created in 1821 by General Jose de San Martin to protect the then recently independent republic of Peru. The name Hussars of Junin was actually adopted after their victorious performance in 1824 at the Battle of Junin which was one of the Spanish-Peruvian confrontations determinant to the final defeat of the Spanish colonial rule. Today, their members guard symbolically the Peruvian government palace wearing the traditional uniform that dates from 1821 and performing a colorful change of guard much admired by visitors.

Junín is a department in Peru. ... José de San Martín (25 February 1778 - 17 August 1850) was an Argentine general and the prime leader of the southern part of South Americas successful struggle for independence from Spain. ... The Battle of Junín was a military engagement of the Peruvian War of Independence, fought in the highlands of the Junín Region on August 6, 1824. ...

Poland

Because the Polish word pancerny initially was used to denote both as a standard adjective meaning "armoured" and a Polish cavalryman lighter than the heavy hussar, currently most Polish armoured units are named "Armoured Cavalry" and refer to the hussar tradition of Polish historical cavalry. Similarly, Polish aero mobile forces refer to traditions of 19th century light cavalry. Towarzysz pancerny, by Józef Brandt. ...

  • 11 Dywizja Kawalerii Pancernej of Jan III Sobieski
  • 6 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej
  • 9 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej
  • 10 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej
  • 15 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej
  • 34 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej

Jan III Sobieski (1629-1696) (also known in English literature as John Sobieski) was one of the most notable monarchs of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1674 until his death. ...

Romania

  • Regimentul 1 Roşiori "General de armată Alexandru Averescu". Formed 1871.
  • Regimentul 4 Roşiori "Regina Maria". Formed 1893.

Transylvanian provinces (today parts of Romania) have been the home of some hussars. Ruler of Transylvania, John Hunyadi created mounted units inspired by his own enemy, the Ottoman Turks. His son, Mathias Corvinus, later king of Hungary is unanimously accepted as the creator of these troops.


In Romania the cavalry regiments were known as "Călărași" (Moldavia) and "Roșiori" (Wallachia). The three (later expanded to ten) Roșiori regiments were the regular units while the Călărași were territorial reserve cavalry who supplied their own horses. These troops played an important role in the Romanian Independence War of 1877 on the Russo-Turkish front. The Roșiori, as their name implies in Romanian, wore red dolmans with black braiding while the Călărași wore dark blue dolmans with red loopings. Both wore fur busbies and white plumes. The Roșiori regiments were distinguished by the different colours of their cloth busby bags (yellow, white, green, light blue, light green, dark blue, light brown, lilac, pink and light grey according to regiment).


After World War I the differences between the two branches of Romanian cavalry disappeared, although the titles of Roșiori and Călărași remained. Both types of cavalry served through World War II on the Russian front as mounted and mechanised units.


The city of Roșiori bears its name due to a hussar unit stationed there in the 17th century by Prince Brâncoveanu.


Hussars have inspired the Romanian Army in organizing its cavalry regiments. Although the Romanian cavalry were not formally designated as hussars, their pre-1915 uniforms as described above were of the classic hussar type. These regiments were created in the second part of the nineteenth century under the rule of Alexandru Ioan Cuza, the creator of Romania (by the unification of Moldova and Wallachia).


Sweden

  • Livregementets husarer (English: Life Regiment Hussars). Founded in 1667 when the Uplandian Cavalry were made into a royal guards regiment. Today Livregementets husarer, also known as K 3, is the last remaining hussar regiment in Sweden and trains one of the two special service units of the Swedish army: the airborne rangers.

Livregementets husarer, K 3 (Life Regiment Hussars, K 3) is one of Swedens oldest units originating from the cavalry prepared from Uppland, Södermanland, Västmanland, Närke and Värmland. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

United Kingdom

Presently, the first two regiments operate in the Armoured role, primarily operating the Challenger 2 main battle tank. The Hussar regiments are grouped together with the Dragoon and Lancer regiments in the order of precedence, all of which are below the Dragoon Guards. The Queens Royal Hussars (QRH), sometimes clarified as The Queens Royal Hussars (The Queens Own and Royal Irish), is a United Kingdom armoured regiment formed on September, 1993 from The Queens Own Hussars and The Queens Royal Irish Hussars. ... The Kings Royal Hussars is an armoured regiment of the British Army. ... The Challenger 2 is the most recent main battle tank in service with the United Kingdom and Oman. ... French dragoon, 1745. ... Volunteer Representative Squadron of the City of Poznań in the uniform of the 15th Uhlan Regiment of Poznań from 1939 A lancer (uhlan) was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ...


Although a Dragoon regiment, The Light Dragoons was formed by the amalgamation of two Hussar regiments, the 13th/18th Royal Hussars (Queen Mary's Own) and the 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars, in 1992. This marks a reversal of the trend during the mid-19th century when all light dragoon regiments then existing were converted to hussars. The Light Dragoons is an armoured regiment of the British Army. ... The 13th/18th Royal Hussars (Queen Marys Own) was a regiment of the British Army. ... The 19th Light Dragoons gained much of their fame in India, where they were given the ASSAYE badge, which had the likeness of an elephant upon it. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


60 (RBH) Sig Sqn is a Territorial Army unit within 36 (Eastern) Signal Regiment and was formed in 1999 from the 5th Battalion The Royal Green Jackets. 36 (Eastern) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. ...


Bibliography

  • Radosław Sikora, Fenomen husarii
  • Bronisław Gembarzewski, Husarze. Ubiór, oporządzenie i uzbrojenie 1500 – 1775
  • Zbigniew Bocheński, Ze studiów nad polską zbroją husarską in: Rozprawy i sprawozdania Muzeum Narodowego w Krakowie. Kraków, 1960
  • Marek Plewczyński, Obertyn 1531
  • Romuald Romański, Beresteczko 1651
  • Leszek Podhorodecki, Sławne bitwy Polaków
  • Szymon Kobyliński, Szymona Kobylińskiego gawędy o broni i mundurze
  • Janusz Sikorski, Zarys dziejów wojskowości polskiej do roku 1864
  • Jan Chryzostom Pasek, Pamiętniki
  • Mirosław Nagielski, Relacje wojenne z pierwszych lat walk polsko-kozackich powstania Bohdana Chmielnickiego
  • Bitwa pod Gniewem 22.IX – 29.IX. 1626, pierwsza porażka husarii in: Studia i materiały do historii wojskowości, Warsaw, 1966
  • J. Cichowski, A. Szulczyński, Husaria
  • Jakub Łoś, Pamiętnik towarzysza chorągwi pancernej

image goes here Noble Family Pasek Coat of Arms Doliwa Parents  ? Consorts unknown Children  ? Date of Birth 1636 Place of Birth Węgrzynowice Date of Death 1 August 1701 Place of Death Niedzieliszki Jan Chryzostom Pasek (1636-1701) was a nobleman (szlachcic) and writer in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
missing-lynx.com - Reviews - Hussar Productions KV Road Wheels (596 words)
The packages of the Hussar KV road-wheel sets state that they can be used on both the Tamiya and Eastern Express models.
This is why I found it odd that a bit of re-engineering is needed to properly attach the wheels to both of the Tamiya and Eastern Express models.
I found it easiest to cut away the outer narrowest part of the torsion bars where the wheels connect as shown in photo 5.
La Luz de Jesus Presents Michael Hussar (104 words)
La Luz de Jesus gallery is proud to present the paintings of Michael Hussar.
Driven by love, hate, sin, redemption and death, Michael Hussar's oil on wood paintings present the viewer with a contextual maturity that is both confrontational and evocative.
Hussar's paintings grace the homes of such Hollywood luminaries as Warren Beatty, Francis Ford Coppolla and Leonardo Di Caprio.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m