FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Husayn ibn Ali
? This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims.
Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.
Husayn ibn Ali
Born third of Shaban 626
in Madinah
Died tenth of Muharram 680
Kerbela,Iraq
Spouse Shahrbanu bint Yazdgerd III
Rubab binte Umrao Al Qais
Children Ali ibn Husayn
Ali Akbar ibn Husayn
Ali Asghar ibn Husayn
Sakina binte Husayn
Fatima Sughra binte Husayn
Parents Ali ibn Abi Talib
Fatimah bint Muhammad

Part of a series on
Islam
Events July 2 - In the early morning, Li Shimin, the future Emperor Tang Taizong of China, eliminated two of his brothers, Li Yuanji and the crown prince Li Jiancheng in a coup détat at the Xuanwu Gate in Changan. ... Events October 10 - Battle of Kerbela November 12 - The Sixth Ecumenical Council opens in Constantinople The Bulgars subjugate the country of current-day Bulgaria Pippin of Herstal becomes Mayor of the Palace Umayyad caliph Muawiyah I succeeded by Yazid I ibn Muawiyah Erwig deposes Wamba to become king of the... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hussein bin Ali (1852-1931) (حسین بن علی; Ḥusayn bin ‘AlÄ«) was the Sharif of Mecca, and Emir of Mecca from 1908 until 1917, when he proclaimed himself king of Hejaz, which received international recognition. ... Image File history File links Circle-question. ... This article is about the Saudi city of Medina. ... Shrine of Karbala Karbala (Arabic: ‎ ; BGN: Karbalā’; also spelled Kerbala, Kerbela, Karbila) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Shahrbanu (or Shahr Banu), is a[] personage described in weak historic sources[] to have been the eldest daughter of Yazdegerd III, the last Emperor of the Sassanid dynasty of Persia/Iran. ... Yazdgerd III (Persian: یزدگرد سوم, made by God), last king of Sassanid dynasty, a grandson of Khosrau II (590–628), who had been murdered by his son Kavadh II of Persia in 628, and was raised to the throne in 632 after a series of internal conflicts. ... Ali ibn Husayn, Zayn al-Abideen, (Arabic: علي بن حسين زين العابدين) ‎ (658 - 713) was the fourth Shia Imam (see Shia Imams). ... Ali Akbar ibn Hussain ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib (Arabic: علي اكبر ابن حسين) (Martyrdom) Sketch Showing Ali Akbar lying on Imam Husayn laps Ali Akbar ibn Hussain was born on 11th of Shabaan 44 AH and he was the son of Imam Hussain and Bibi Umm-e-Laila. ... Ali Asghar ibn Husayn (Tenth of Rajab, 60 AH - Tenth of Muharram, 60 AH) was the youngest child of Husayn ibn Ali (the grandson of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad and the third Shia Imam) and Rubab (the daughter of the chief of the Kinda Imra al-Qays tribe). ... Shrine of Syeda Sakina Sakina binte Hussain (Arabic: سكينة) was the youngest daughter of Hussain ibn Ali and Umm-e-Rubab (Rubab binte Umrao Al Qais). ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... For other persons of the same name, see Fatima (name). ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...



Image File history File links Mosque02. ...

Beliefs
Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ...

Allah · Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Allah. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ...

Practices

Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage The Five Pillars of Islam (أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... It has been suggested that Salat of Quran be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This article is about the Islamic tradition. ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first recitations of the Quran in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

Timeline of Muslim history
Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shi'a Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the rightly guided Caliphs. ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the dynamic body of Islamic religious law. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
Fiqh · Sharia
Kalam · Tasawwuf (Sufism) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus of... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the dynamic body of Islamic religious law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

Sunni · Shi'a

Culture & Society
Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

Academics · Animals · Architecture · Art
Calendar · Children · Demographics
Festivals · Mosques · Philosophy
Politics · Science · Women Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Islamic art denotes the arts produced from the 7th century onwards by people (not necessarily Muslim) who lived within the territory that was inhabited by culturally Islamic populations. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... This article discusses childrens rights given by Islam, childrens duties towards their parents, parents treatment of their children, both males and females, biological and foster children, also discussed are some of the differences regarding rights with respect to different schools of thoughts. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... - - - Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world. ...

Islam & other religions
This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Christianity · Jainism
Judaism · Sikhism

See also
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jainism and Islam came in close contact with each other following the Islamic Conquest from Central Asia and Persia in the seventh to the twelfth centuries when much of north and central India came under the rule of the Delhi Sultanate, and later the Mughal dynasty. ... This article is about the historical interaction between Islam and Judaism. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... It has been suggested that Persecution of Muslims be merged into this article or section. ... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

Islam Portal

view


Ḥusayn ibn ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib (حسين بن علي بن أﺑﻲ طالب)‎ (third of Shaban 626, at Medina - tenth of Muharram 680, at Karbala) was the grandson of Muhammad. His mother was Muhammad's daughter Fatima Zahra and his father was Muhammad's cousin, and is the first Imam to Shia Muslims, and the fourth Caliph to Sunni Muslims, Ali ibn Abi Talib. Husayn ibn Ali is revered as the third Imam (caliph) by Shi’a Muslims. Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article is about Muhammads daughter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For main article see: Caliphate First of all, this system is invalid and is unlawful Islamicly. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


He was killed in the Battle of Karbala in 680 CE. The anniversary of his death is called Ashura and it is a day of mourning and religious observance for Shi'a Muslims.This day is well-known because of mourning for the martyrdom of Husayn ibn Ali the grandson of Muhammad, along with 72 members of his family and close friends at the Battle of Karbala in the year 61 AH (AD 680). Yazid I Ibn Muwa'via Ibn Abu Sufyan was in power then and wanted the Bay'ah (allegiance) of Husayn ibn Ali. Yazid was openly going against the teachings of Islam in public and changing the sunnah of Muhammad.[citation needed] Historians agree that if Husayn ibn Ali had not taken the stance that he did, the religion of Islam would not be what it is today.[citation needed] It is reputed that Mahatma Gandhi said: "I learned from Hussein, how to be wronged and yet emerge a winner."[cite this quote] Combatants Banu Hashim Commanders Umar ibn Saad Husayn ibn Ali† Strength over 40 000 72 Casualties 100+ 72(Tabari) The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, 61 AH (October 9 or 10, 680 CE)[1][2] in Karbala, in present day Iraq. ... The Day of Aashurah, sometimes spelled ‘Ashurah or Aashoorah, falls on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus of...

Contents

The birth of Husayn ibn Ali

After Hasan ibn Ali was born; Fatima al-Zahra bint Muhammad became pregnant with her second child. Fatima started noticing the signs that childbearing was near, but Muhammad had already foretold of Husayn ibn Ali’s birth.


On Sha'ban 3, 4 H.E., Muhammad was given news of the birth of Husayn ibn Ali. Muhammad hurried to the house of Fatimah al-Zahra his daughter and Ali ibn Abi Talib. Saffiyah bint ‘Abd al-Muttalib, Asma bint Umais, and Umm Salama were present when Husayn ibn Ali was born. Shaaban (Arabic: شعبان ) is the eighth month of the Islamic calendar. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Saffiyah binte ‘Abd al-MutÌ£tÌ£alib was a Sahaba and a prominent person in Islamic history. ... Asma bint Umais is the sister of Maymuna bint al-Harith. ... Hind bint Abi Umayya (c. ...


When Muhammad asked Safiyah bint 'Abd al-Muttalib to bring him the newborn child, she said: "We have not cleaned him yet." When Muhammad heard this, he said: "You clean him? Surely Allah the Exalted has cleaned and purified him."


Asma bint Umais took the newborn child to him wrapped in a piece of cloth. Muhammad took him in his arms and recited the call to prayer (Adhan) into his right ear, and read the shorter version (Iqama) in his left ear. He then placed the infant in his lap and wept.


"May my father and mother be your sacrifice", Asma bint Umais asked Muhammad, "Why are you crying?"


"Because of my son", he replied.


"He is a newborn infant", she said.


"O Asma", he said, "After me, the transgressing party will kill him. May Allah never grant them my intercession."


Then he said: "Asma, do not tell Fatima about this, for she has just given birth to him." [1]


After Husayn ibn Ali was born, Archangel Gabriel descended to Muhammad and revealed to him to give the newborn child the name Al-Husayn. Al-Husayn is the Arabic version of the old Hebrew name Shabir, which was the name of Harun’s second son. When Gabriel descended to Muhammad, scores of angels accompanied him to congratulate and console Muhammad for Husayn ibn Ali's birth and expected death. Gabriel delivering the Annunciation. ...


Seven days after the birth Muhammad shaved Husayn ibn Ali’s head and gave the gold equivalent of the weight of his hair as charity for him.


Ali's caliphate and the claims of his sons

In Islamic heritage, we notice that successorship of a prophet had always been by explicit declaration by the prophet himself, like Aaron was declared the successor of Moses, by none other than Moses. Also, the successors to most of the prophets of semitic religions had been from the bloodline of the prophets. This was a tradition firmly established by the Islamic God, Allah. And this was perhaps, the most logical cause of confusion as to who should lead the Muslims after the demise of their prophet. However, discarding the tradition of successorship, a caliph was elected by highly regarded political figures of the earliest Muslim community.


This lead to a feeling among some Muslims that Ali, Husayn's father was, by implication of the Islamic tradition, rightful successor of the prophet and was denied his right. However, Ali maintained that although a right of the successor, leadership of the Muslim state was not to be perceived as successorship to the prophet since Islam was meant to be faith and not state. Thus, he stood firm as the bearer of Imamate while not the bearer of caliphate nor did he pledge his allegiance to his predecessors. In 656 AD, when Uthman, the third caliph was killed by a revolting mob, all those who rejected Ali's claim earlier, came to him and pleaded of him to take up the position of the head of the temporal state. He was a caliph for four years and four months only, during this short period he faced continual challenges from the group of Muawiyah and other contenders. In 661 AD Ali was assassinated by Ibn Muljim, in the mosque of kufa. AL or Al may refer to: Look up AL, Al in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ... Muawiyah I (602 - May 6, 680), early Muslim leader and founder of the great Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs. ... For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ...


Ali's followers proclaimed that his eldest son Hassan, who was the successor to Ali's Imamate should be the caliph and the Islamic tradition must not be discarded again. Muawiyah had fought Ali for the leadership of the empire and now prepared to fight Hassan. After a few inconclusive skirmishes between the armies of Hassan and Muawiyah, Hassan reminded his followers of Ali's position that Imamate is sufficient for successorship of the prophet and that leading the Muslim state was not a criterion. Thus, to avoid agonies of another civil war, he signed a treaty with Muawiyah and relinquished the control of what had turned into an Arabian kingdom; while not having pledged his allegiance to Muawiyah. Even after taking such a stance, Hsssan was poisoned and killed in 669 by Muawiyah. This left Husayn as the head of the Alids, the successor to Hassan's Imamate. The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ... Muawiyah I (602 - May 6, 680), early Muslim leader and founder of the great Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs. ... The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ... Muawiyah I (602 - May 6, 680), early Muslim leader and founder of the great Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs. ...


Muawiyah chose to proclaim his son Yazid as the heir to his throne, and the alleged leader of the Muslim state. He died in 680. in Damascus, Muawiyah's capital and the heart of his power, Yazid was now the caliph. Having realized that unless Husayn, the grandson of the prophet and the legitimate successor to Hassan, submits to his command, his caliphate would not be deemed legitimate due to the clause in Hassan's treaty with Muawiyah which forbade Muawiyah from appointing a successor to himself. Thus, he tried several times to force Husayn into pledging allegiance to him. Yazid Ibn Muawiyah Ibn Abu Sufyan (July 23, 645 - 683) (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان) was the second Caliph of the Umayyad dynasty. ... Nickname: The Seal of the Damascus Governorate Syria Syria Governorates Damascus Governorate Government  - Governor Bishr Al Sabban Area  - City 573 km²  (221. ...


It is a fact of history that Yazid was a man of no faith as he claimed that Islam was no more than a game of the Hashimites to attain temporal power. In the face of such a claim, had the grandson of the prophet submitted to Yazid, it would conclusively affirm Yazid's position about genuineness of Islam.


In order to avoid being forced to submit, Husayn left Madina for Mecca. It is to be noted that Husayn had sufficient supporters in Hijaz whom he could easily mobilize, but did not.


The people of Kufa had sent several letters to Husayn, inviting him to fill the void left by demise of Hassan and to lead them in religious affairs. Yazid, who was already paranoid, perceived this a danger to his throne. He plotted to kill the grandson of the prophet during the Hajj, in the precincts of the Holy Kaaba, thus defiling and desecrating it.


In order to avoid this sacrilege, Husayn took along his wives, children, a few friends and relatives and headed towards Kufa to fulfill the responsibility of the bearer of Imamate and to fulfill his destiny as was prophesied by his grandfather, Mohammad. The Imamate was the state built up by the imams of Dagestan during the early and middle of the nineteenth century in the Eastern Caucasus, especially in Chechnya and Dagestan, to fight against the invasion of the Russian Empire. ...


On his way, he was offered military support by the tribe of Banu Tayy as well as sanctuary in their hills from where he could (if he wanted to) safely lead a revolt and overthrow Yazid. But surprisingly, he refused the offer and continued his journey with his few companions.


Battle of Karbala

Main article: Battle of Karbala

The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, 61 AH (October 9 or 10, 680 CE) in Karbala. On one side were supporters and relatives of Muhammad's grandson Husayn ibn Ali; on the other side was a military detachment from the forces of Yazid I, the Umayyad caliph. The battlefield was a desert region located beside one of the branches of the Euphrates River. Image File history File links Imam_Hussain's_Roza. ... Image File history File links Imam_Hussain's_Roza. ... Imam Husayn Shrine 3D Model of Imam Husayn Shrine The Imam Husayn Shrine is a holy place in Shia Islam in the city of Karbala, Iraq. ... Combatants Banu Hashim Commanders Umar ibn Saad Husayn ibn Ali† Strength over 40 000 72 Casualties 100+ 72(Tabari) The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, 61 AH (October 9 or 10, 680 CE)[1][2] in Karbala, in present day Iraq. ... The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is in Old Persian Ufrat, Aramaic Prâth/Frot, in Arabic الفرات, in Turkish Fırat and in ancient Assyrian language Pu-rat-tu) is the westernmost of the two great rivers that define...


Husayn ibn Ali's group consisted of notable members of Muhammad's close relatives, around 72 men their women and children. On the other side were the armed forces of Yazid I, about 9,00,000 men led by Umar ibn Sa'ad. It intrigues historians that Hurr ibn Rihaee, one of the highest ranked commanders of Yazid's army, who was the man responsible for stopping Husayn at Karbala left the overwhelming force of 9,00,000 soldiers and joined Husayn with his son and a slave, before dawn of 10th of Muharram to die by Husayn's side in the battle and Husayn welcomed the three men with no element of shock, as if he knew and was waiting for them. Yazid Ibn Muawiyah Ibn Abu Sufyan (July 23, 645 - 683) (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان) was the second Caliph of the Umayyad dynasty. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


On the day of the battle, Umar ibn Sa'ad offered refuge to Husayn and his companions if they agreed to submit to Yazid's command and pledged allegiance to Yazid. Husayn's group, their men, women and children unanimously refused this and chose martyrdom over submission. In response to Umar ibn Saad's offer, Husayn gave the historic sermon of Ashura which is considered by Shiites as the manifesto of a hero. Upon refusal of this offer, Umar ibn Sa'ad ordered his forces to commence the attack. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Despite the figures of 72 men against 900,000, it is recorded that the battle went on from dawn to dusk. However, the outcome was obvious. Husayn and his companions were martyred and their women and children were taken captives. The captives were made to travel to Syria through the deserts of Iraq, tied in ropes and taken on camels without saddles, due to which many of the children fell off the camels and the women were not allowed to even stop and help their children. The graves of these children can still be seen in the desert between Karabla and Kufa. It is to be noted that people who did this with the family of Mohammad were themselves Muslims.


Husayn was such a phenomenal figure that even a group of Hindu saraswat brahmins of bharadwaj gotra left India for joining Husayn when they came to know that Husayn had left Mecca for Kufa. However, Husayn had been martyred by the time they reached Iraq. It is said that centuries before Husayn's birth, a hindu saint had prophesied about him and had instructed his followers to join Husayn if they live in his time. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


When Rahab Dutt, a hindu saraswat brahmin, learned about Husayn's death, he and his sons chased after Yazid's general and his men, to take revenge. All of Rahab's sons were killed and Rahab was wounded. Other group that set out to take revenge was the group of Muqtar. When Yazid learned that people are seeking to avenge Husayn, he ordered all brahmins (Specifically bharadwaj brahmins) to be killed or routed out of Arabia and others to be arrested and brought before him.


Today, martyrdom of Husayn ibn Ali is commemorated during every Muharram, with the most important of these days being its tenth day, Ashura. Muharram (Arabic: محرم ) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. ... The Day of Aashurah, sometimes spelled ‘Ashurah or Aashoorah, falls on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar. ...


Burial

Husayn's body is said to have been buried in Karbala, near the site of his death. Most accounts say that his head was later retrieved and interred with his body. However, various sources identify eight possible locations for the head's resting place. The Imam Husayn Shrine was later built over his grave; it is now a holy site of pilgrimage for Sunni and Shia Muslims. Imam Husayn Shrine 3D Model of Imam Husayn Shrine The Imam Husayn Shrine is a holy place in Shia Islam in the city of Karbala, Iraq. ...


Commemoration of Husayn ibn Ali

The Remembrance of Muharram (Arabic: ذكرى محرم or مناسبة محرم) is an important period of mourning in the Shia branch of Islam. ...

Shi'a views of Husayn

Shi'ahs regard Husayn as an Imam (lord of the spiritual kingdom) and a martyr.He is believed to be the third imam. He set out on his path in order to save Islam and the Ummah from annihilation at the hands of Yazid. According to Shi'a belief he was a willing sacrifice to religious necessity, and Shi'as view Husayn as an exemplar of courage and resistance against tyranny. Ashura, a day of mourning and self-reflection, is held in honor of his suffering. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Martyr in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Day of Aashurah, sometimes spelled ‘Ashurah or Aashoorah, falls on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar. ...


The saying, "Every day is Ashura, every land is Karbala," is a reminder to live one's life as Husayn did on Ashura, with total sacrifice to Allah and for others. This saying also signifies "We must always remember, because there is suffering everywhere".


Hadith of Muhammad about Husayn ibn Ali

Ibn Saad narrates from ash-shabi:


Ali ibn Abi Talib while on his way to the battle of Siffin, passed through the desert of Karbala, there he stopped and wept very bitterly. When interrogated regarding the cause of his weeping, he commented that one day he visited Muhammad and found him weeping. When he asked Muhammad as to what was the reason which made him weep, he replied, "O Ali Gabriel has just been with me and informed me that my son Husayn would be martyred in Karbala, a place near the bank of the River Euphrates. This moved me so much that I could not help weeping."


Anas ibn Harith narrates:


One day Muhammad ascended the pulpit to deliver a sermon to his associates while Husayn and Hasan sons of Ali were sitting before him. When address was over, he put his left hand on Husayn and raising his head towards Heaven and said: "O my lord! I am Muhammad Your slave and your prophet, and these two are the distinguished and pious members of my family who would fortify my cause after me. O my Lord! Gabriel has informed me that son Husayn would be killed. O my Lord! Bless my cause in recompense for Husayn's martyrdom, make him the leader of the martyrs, be You be his helper and guardian and do not bless his murderers".


Khwaja Mu'inuddin Chishti says:


He gave his head but did not put his hand into the hands of Yazid. Verily, Husayn is the foundation of "La ilaha il Allah ". Husayn is lord and the lord of lords. Husayn himself is Islam and the shield of Islam. Though he gave his head (for Islam) but never pledged Yazid. Truly Husayn is the founder of "There is no God but Allah".


Sayings of Muhammad about Husayn ibn Ali in Sunni books

"Al-Hasan and al-Husayn are the chiefs of the youth of Paradise and Fatimah is the chief of their women."

  1. Sahih al-Tirmidhi, v5, p660, on the authority of Abu Sa'id and Hudhayfa
  2. Sunan Ibn Majah, Introduction 8
  3. al-Tabarani, on the authorities of: Umar, Ali, Jabir, Abu Hurayrah, Usamah Ibn Zaid, al-Baraa, Ibn 'Adi, and Ibn Masud.
  4. al-Kubra, by al-Nasa'i
  5. Musnad Ahmad Ibn Hanbal, v1, pp 62,82, v3, pp 3,64, v5, p391
  6. Fada'il al-Sahaba, by Ahmad Hanbal, v2, p771, Tradition #1360
  7. al-Mustadrak, by al-Hakim, v3, pp 166,167
  8. Hilyatul Awliyaa, by Abu Nu'aym, v5, p71
  9. Majma' al-Zawa'id, by al-Haythami, v9, p187
  10. Tuhfatul Ashraf, by Lumzi, v3, p31
  11. Ibn Habban, as mentioned in al-Mawarid, pp 551,553
  12. al-Sawa'iq al-Muhriqah, by Ibn Hajar Haythami, Ch. 11, section 3, p290
  13. Mishkat al-Masabih, by Khatib al-Tabrizi, English Version, Tradition #6154

Muhammad said, "The member of my home (family members specified in other narrations as Fatima, Ali, Hasan, and Husayn) is from me and I am from Them."

  1. Musnad Ahmad Ibn Hanbal, v4, p172
  2. Fadha'il al-Sahaba, by Ahmad Hanbal, v2, p772, Tradition #1361
  3. al-Mustadrak, by al-Hakim, v3, p 177
  4. Amali, by Abu Nu'aym al-Isbahani, p 64
  5. al-Kuna wal Asmaa, by al-Dulabi, v1, p88
  6. al-Tabarani, v3, p21
  7. Adab by al-Bukhari, also al-Tirmidhi and Ibn Majah, as quoted in:
  8. al-Sawa'iq al-Muhriqah, by Ibn Hajar Haythami, Ch. 11, section 3, p291
  9. Mishkat al-Masabih, by Khatib al-Tabrizi, English Version, Tradition #6160

Muhammad looked toward Ali, Fatimah, Hasan, and Husayn, and then said, "I am in war with those who will fight you, and in peace with those who are peaceful to you."

  1. Sahih al-Tirmidhi, v5, p699
  2. Sunan Ibn Majah, v1, p52
  3. Fadha'il al-Sahaba, by Ahmad Ibn Hanbal, v2, p767, Tradition #1350
  4. al-Mustadrak, by al-Hakim, v3, p149
  5. Majma' al-Zawa'id, by al-Haythami, v9, p169
  6. al-Kabir, by al-Tabarani, v3, p30, also in al-Awsat
  7. Jami' al-Saghir, by al-Ibani, v2, p17
  8. Tarikh, by al-Khateeb al-Baghdadi, v7, p137
  9. Sawaiq al-Muhriqah, by Ibn Hajar al-Haythami, p144
  10. Talkhis, by al-Dhahabi, v3, p149
  11. Dhakha'ir al-Uqba, by al-Muhib al-Tabari, p25
  12. Mishkat al-Masabih, by Khatib al-Tabrizi, English Version, Tradition #6145

Muhammad said, "He who loves al-Hasan and al-Husayn, has loved me, and he who makes them angry has made me angry."

  1. Sunan Ibn Majah,
  2. al-Mustadrak, by al-Hakim, from Abu Hurairah
  3. Musnad Ahmad Ibn Hanbal, as quoted in:
  4. al-Sawa'iq al-Muhriqah, by Ibn Hajar Haythami, Ch. 11, section 3, p292

Maxims attributed to Hussayn ibn Ali

  1. O Allah, what did he find who lost you, and what did he lose who found you?
  2. Some people worship Allah for the purpose of gaining His gifts. This is the worship of the merchants. Some worship Him for the purpose of avoiding His punishment. This is the worship of the slaves. Some worship Him as showing gratitude to Him. This is the worship of the genuine ones. It is the best worship. [1]
  3. When he clashed with vanguards of ibn Ziyad led by Hurr during his journey toward Karbala: "... Don't you see that the truth is not put into action and the false is not prohibited? The believer has got to be fond of meeting his God justly. So I do not consider the death but blessedness and living with the oppressors other than abjectness."
  4. Part of his speech on Ashura: "... Lo and behold; an ignoble (i.e ibn Ziyad), son of other ignoble (i.e. Ziyad ibn Abihi), has entangled me in a bifurcation, between either unsheathing the swords or accepting abjectness. And far be it that we accept abjectness. Allah abominates that for us, plus his proph­et, believers, the chaste pure gentlewomen, those who do not accept oppression as well as the souls who do not submit to meanness abominate it. They disapprove that we prefer obedience of scrooges to the best sites of murder. Beware; I assault you together with this family while they are few and when the helpers deserted. ... "
Preceded by
Hasan ibn Ali
Shia Imam and head of Banu Hashim
669–680
Succeeded by
Ali ibn Husayn

Ubayd Allah was a son of Ziyad ibn Abi Sufyan. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Shrine of Karbala Karbala (Arabic: ‎; BGN: Karbalā’; also spelled Kerbala, Kerbela, Karbila) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... The Day of Aashurah, sometimes spelled ‘Ashurah or Aashoorah, falls on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar. ... Ubayd Allah was a son of Ziyad ibn Abi Sufyan. ... Ziyad ibn Abi Sufyan was born in Taif to a member of the Banu Fuqaim, of unknown parentage. ... Hassan ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib ()‎ (Fifteenth of Ramadan, 3 AH – Twenty-eighth of Safar, 50 AH) [6] was the grandson of Muhammad, and was the son of Ali ibn Abi Talib (the first Shi’ah Imam and the fourth Sunni Caliph) and Fatima Zahra (a daughter of Muhammad). ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam. ... BanÅ« Hāshim (Arabic: بنو هاشم) was a clan in the Quraish tribe. ... Ali ibn Husayn, Zayn al-Abideen, (Arabic: علي بن حسين زين العابدين) ‎ (658 - 713) was the fourth Shia Imam (see Shia Imams). ...

See also

Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘Alī ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... Hasan ibn Ali ibn Abu Talib (c. ... Abbas ibn Ali (Arabic: العباس بن علي) (fourth of Shabaan 26th A.H., at Medina - tenth of Muharrum 61 A.H., at Karbala) was the son of the fourth sunni Caliph and the first Shiah Imam, Ali ibn Abu Talib and Fatima binte Hizam, commonly known as Ummul Baneen. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Ali ibn Husayn, Zainul Abideen, (658 - 713) (alternative spellings include bin, ben for the middle word and Hussain, Husain, Hussein, etc. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Muhammad al-Baqir Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (676 - January 31, 743) was the fifth Shia Imam. ... Jafar Al-Sadiq (Arabic: جعفر الصادق in full Jafar ibn Muhammad ibn Ali ibn Husayn (702 AD - 765 AD ) is the sixth infallible Imam and one of Ahl al-Bayt of the Shia Muslims. ... Imam Musa al Kazim (November 10, 745 - September 4, 799) was the seventh Shia Imam (he is not accepted by the Ismailis as the seventh Imam). ... Imām ˤAlī ibn-Mūsā ar-Riđā (Arabic: علي بن موسى الرضا) (January 1, 766 - May 26, 818) was the eighth Shīˤa Imām. ... Imam Muhammad al-Taqi (Arabic: امام محمد التقي)(April 12, 811 - November 27, 835) was the ninth Shia Imam in the Ithna Ashari (Twelver) tradition. ... Imam Ali al-Hadi (September 8, 828 _ July 1, 868) was the tenth Shia Imam. ... Hasan al-Askari (Arabic: الإمام الحسن بن علي العسكري) (December 6, 846 – January 1, 874), was the eleventh Shia Imam. ... It has been suggested that Mahdi be merged into this article or section. ... Muhammad ibn al-Hanafiyyah was the son of the first Shi’a Imam (Ali ibn Abu Talib) but he was called Ibn Hanafiyyah after his mother. ... Combatants Banu Hashim Commanders Umar ibn Saad Husayn ibn Ali† Strength over 40 000 72 Casualties 100+ 72(Tabari) The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, 61 AH (October 9 or 10, 680 CE)[1][2] in Karbala, in present day Iraq. ... The Day of Ashura ( transliteration: , Ashura, Ashoura, and other spellings) is on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar and marks the climax of the Remembrance of Muharram but not the Islamic month. ... This article refers to the shrine of Imam Hussain also spelled as Hussain ibn Ali | Hussein | Hussein. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... People of Mohammeds (s. ... Arbaeen (Arabic: ‎, means forty), or Chehlum, as it is known by Urdu-speaking Muslims, is a Shia religious holiday that occurs forty days after the Day of Ashurah, the commemoration of the martyrdom by beheading of Husayn bin Ali, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad which falls on... Zulfiqar, a fictional representation of the sword of Ali. ... Azadari means mourning for Imam Husayn ibn Ali , his family and companions. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Muhammad Ibn Ismail Bukhari and Muhammad Muhsin Khan (1996). The English Translation of Sahih Al Bukhari With the Arabic Text. Al-Saadawi Publications. ISBN 1881963594. 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Husayn ibn Ali - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (921 words)
Ḥusayn ibn ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib (Arabic: حسين بن علي بن أﺑﻲ طالب‎ ​)‎ 28th August (626 680) was the grandson of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.
Husayn was the second son of Ali and Fatima.
Husayn's father, Ali, was caliph from 656 to 661 CE.
Ali ibn Hussayn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (687 words)
Ali ibn Husayn (658-713) (Arabic: علي بن حسين زين العابدين) is the fourth Shi'a Imam.
Ali ibn Husayn was born in Medina in 658.
Ali suggested instead that she be offered her choice of the Muslim men as husband and that her dower be paid from the public treasury.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m