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Encyclopedia > Hurricane Camille
Hurricane Camille
Category 5 hurricane (SSHS)

Hurricane Camille in the Gulf of Mexico
Formed August 14, 1969
Dissipated August 22, 1969
Highest
winds
200 mph (325 km/h) (1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure 905 mbar (hPa; 26.74 inHg)
Fatalities 259 direct[1]
Damage $1.42 billion (1969 USD)
$7.8 billion (2006 USD)
Areas
affected
Cuba, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Southern United States, East-Central United States
Part of the
1969 Atlantic hurricane season

Hurricane Camille was the third tropical cyclone and second hurricane of the 1969 Atlantic hurricane season. Camille was the second of three Category 5 hurricanes to make landfall in the United States during the 20th century, which it did near the mouth of the Mississippi River on the night of August 17, resulting in catastrophic damage. Camille was the only Atlantic hurricane with official winds reported to reach 190 mph until Allen equalled that number in 1980. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... Summary Hurricane Camille in the Gulf of Mexico on August 16, 1969. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... HPA means Physiology Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis: The hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands work together to regulate hormone levels and maintain homeostasis. ... Inches of mercury or inHg is a non SI unit for pressure. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ... First storm formed: July 25, 1969 Last storm dissipated: Nov. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... First storm formed: July 25, 1969 Last storm dissipated: Nov. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... Hurricane Charley making landfall on August 13, 2004 at its peak intensity. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Atlantic” redirects here. ... Hurricane Allen was the strongest hurricane of the 1980 Atlantic hurricane season. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


The storm formed on August 14 and rapidly deepened. It scraped the western edge of Cuba at Category 3 intensity. Camille strengthened further over the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall with a pressure of 905 mbar (hPa), estimated sustained winds of 200 mph (325 km/h), and a peak storm surge of 24 feet (7.3 m); by maximum sustained wind speeds, Camille was the strongest landfalling tropical cyclone recorded worldwide, and one of only four tropical cyclones worldwide ever to achieve wind speeds of 190 mph. The hurricane flattened nearly everything along the coast of the U.S. state of Mississippi, and caused additional flooding and deaths inland while crossing the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia. In total, Camille killed 259 people and caused $1.42 billion (1969 USD, $9.14 billion 2005 USD) [2] in damages. is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hurricane Charley nearing landfall after its rapid deepening phase Rapid deepening is when the minimum sea-level pressure of a tropical cyclone decreases drastically in a short period of time. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... HPA means Physiology Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis: The hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands work together to regulate hormone levels and maintain homeostasis. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see M (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

Contents

Storm history

Storm track
Storm track

A tropical wave left the coast of Africa on August 5, becoming a tropical disturbance on August 9, 480 miles east of the Leeward Islands. Aircraft reconnaissance identified a closed circulation in the disturbance on the 14th near Grand Cayman and the system was designated Tropical Storm Camille with 60 mph (95 km/h) winds. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x746, 507 KB) Summary Hurricane Camille (1969) track. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x746, 507 KB) Summary Hurricane Camille (1969) track. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Leeward Islands are the northern islands of the Lesser Antilles. ... Grand Cayman from space, April 1994 Grand Cayman is the largest of the three Cayman Islands at about 196 km² and contains the capital George Town. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


The storm already had a well organized circulation and rapidly strengthened from August 14 to August 15 to a 115 mph (185 km/h) major hurricane before hitting the western tip of Cuba later that day. Land interaction weakened Camille to a 100 mph (160 km/h) hurricane, but it returned to perfect conditions as it crossed the Gulf of Mexico (possibly while passing over the Loop Current). On August 17, Camille reached an intense minimum central pressure of 905 mbar (hPa), and it continued to strengthen to a peak of over 200 mph (325 km/h) winds (possibly the strongest ever recorded in an Atlantic hurricane). In the hours before landfall, a reconnaissance aircraft was unable to obtain a surface wind report, but it estimated winds of up to 205 mph (335 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 901 mbar (hPa). is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Gulf Stream currents (1943 map). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... HPA means Physiology Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis: The hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands work together to regulate hormone levels and maintain homeostasis. ... Atlantic hurricane refers to a tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean north of the equator, usually in the Northern Hemisphere summer or autumn. ...


Camille crossed the southeastern tip of Louisiana, and then hit near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, on the night of August 17. Its Category 5 strength winds are only estimated, due to the lack of wind reports near the center, though the NASA site at Stennis Space Center near Picayune, Mississippi, recorded an estimated gust of 160 mph with a pressure of 950 mbar. It maintained hurricane force winds for 10 hours as it moved 150 miles inland. As Camille turned east, it weakened to a tropical depression over northern Mississippi on the 19th. It picked up additional moisture from the Gulf Stream along the way and produced torrential rains in the remote mountains of Virginia. Camille turned eastward as it moved inland, and emerged into the Atlantic Ocean near Virginia Beach, Virginia, on the 20th. The depression restrengthened over the Gulf Stream, and briefly attained a peak of 70 mph (110 km/h) before becoming extratropical on the 22nd, east of Nova Scotia. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Bay Saint Louis is a city located in Hancock County, Mississippi. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Category 5 can refer to either: Category 5 cable used for carrying data Category 5 computer virus as classified by Symantec Corporation for the most severe threat level. ... The John C. Stennis Space Center (or SSC), located in Hancock County, Mississippi at the Mississippi/Louisiana border, is NASAs largest rocket engine test facility. ... Picayune is the largest city in Pearl River County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Location in the Commonwealth o Virginia. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...

Impact

Most intense landfalling U.S. hurricanes
Intensity is measured solely by central pressure
Rank Hurricane Season Landfall pressure
1 "Labor Day" 1935 892 mbar (hPa)
2 Camille 1969 909 mbar (hPa)
3 Katrina 2005 920 mbar (hPa)
4 Andrew 1992 922 mbar (hPa)
5 "Indianola" 1886 925 mbar (hPa)
6 "Florida Keys" 1919 927 mbar (hPa)
7 "Okeechobee" 1928 929 mbar (hPa)
8 Donna 1960 930 mbar (hPa)
9 "New Orleans" 1915 931 mbar (hPa)
Carla 1961 931 mbar (hPa)
Source: National Hurricane Center

Making landfall as a Category 5 hurricane, Camille caused damage and destruction across much of the Gulf Coast of the United States. Because it moved quickly through the region, Hurricane Camille dropped only moderate precipitation in most areas. Most other areas reported from 1 to 6 inches.[citation needed] The area of total destruction in Harrison County, Mississippi was 68 square miles (176 km²).[3] The total estimated cost of damage was $1.42 billion (1969 USD, $9.14 billion 2005 USD).[2] This made Camille the second-most expensive hurricane in the United States, up to that point (behind Hurricane Betsy).[4] The storm directly killed 143 people along Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. An additional 153 people perished as a result of catastrophic flooding in Nelson County, Virginia and other areas nearby. In all, 8,931 people were injured, 5,662 homes were destroyed, and 13,915 homes experienced major damage, with many of the fatalities being coastal residents who had refused to evacuate. Lowest pressure 892 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $6 million+ (1935 dollars) $82 million+ (2005 dollars) Fatalities 408 - 600 direct Areas affected Bahamas, Florida Keys, Florida Panhandle, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina Part of the 1935 Atlantic hurricane season The Labor Day Hurricane was a very compact, intense hurricane that... The 1935 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1935, and lasted until November 30, 1935. ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... HPA means Physiology Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis: The hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands work together to regulate hormone levels and maintain homeostasis. ... First storm formed: July 25, 1969 Last storm dissipated: Nov. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ... Lowest pressure 922 mbar (hPa; 27. ... The 1992 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1992, and lasted until November 30, 1992. ... Lowest pressure 925 mbar (hPa; 27. ... The 1886 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1886, and lasted until November 30, 1886. ... The Florida Keys Hurricane or Atlantic Gulf Hurricane of 1919 was an intense Atlantic hurricane. ... The 1919 Atlantic hurricane season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. ... Lowest pressure 929 mbar (hPa; 27. ... The 1928 Atlantic hurricane season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. ... Lowest pressure ≤930 mbar (hPa) Damage $3. ... First storm formed: June 22, 1960 Last storm dissipated: Sept. ... The New Orleans Hurricane of 1915 was an intense Category 4 hurricane that made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana during the 1915 Atlantic hurricane season. ... The 1915 Atlantic hurricane season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. ... Hurricane Carla, a Category 5 at peak intensity, was one of the most powerful storms to ever strike the United States. ... ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... Harrison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Hurricane Betsy was a powerful hurricane of the 1965 Atlantic hurricane season which caused enormous damage in the Bahamas, Florida, and Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Nelson County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ...


Gulf of Mexico

Shell Oil Company measured waves 70-75 feet high during this intense cyclone. One of its rigs was lost not only because of extreme wave action, but also due to a mudslide at the Gulf of Mexico's bottom. The ocean floor in the Gulf of Mexico's South Block 70 lowered during the hurricane's passage. Property damages to the offshore oil industry totaled US$100 million (1969 dollars).[5] The Shell emblem known as the Pecten Shell Oil Company (SOC) is the Houston, Texas based wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


Gulf Coast and the Caribbean

Ships beached in Gulfport, Mississippi.
Ships beached in Gulfport, Mississippi.

In Cuba, the only Caribbean island greatly affected by Camille, three deaths were reported. Over 10 inches of rain were recorded in the western portion of Cuba.[6] But in continental North America, where Camille was stronger, more damage was brought. While moving over southeastern Louisiana, the Weather Bureau Office at Boothville reported wind gusts of 107 mph. At least $350 million (1969 USD, $1.85 billion 2005 USD)[2] in damage was reported.[7] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 523 pixelsFull resolution (1816 × 1188 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 523 pixelsFull resolution (1816 × 1188 pixel, file size: 1. ... Location of Gulfport in the State of Mississippi Coordinates: , Country United States State Mississippi County Harrison Founded Incorporated Government  - Mayor Brent Warr Area  - City  64. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Boothville-Venice is a census-designated place and collection of neighboring communities located in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. ...


Alabama also experienced damage along U.S. Highway 90: 26,000 homes and over 1,000 businesses were wiped out completely across the state of Alabama. Camille's large circulation also resulted in a 3-to-5 foot (1-1.5m) storm surge in Apalachicola, Florida. The mouth of the Apalachicola River, looking towards the Bay. ...


Mississippi received the worst of the damage. Upon making landfall, Camille produced a 24-foot (7.3-m) storm surge. Along Mississippi's entire shore and for some three to four blocks inland, the destruction was nearly complete. The worst hit areas were Clermont Harbor, Lakeshore, Waveland, Bay St. Louis, Pass Christian, Long Beach, and the beach front of Gulfport, Mississippi City, and Biloxi. Clermont Harbor is an unincorporated village on the western end of Hancock County and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. ... Waveland is a city located in Hancock County, Mississippi, on the Gulf of Mexico. ... Bay Saint Louis is a city located in Hancock County, Mississippi. ... Pass Christian (pronounce [1]) is a city in Harrison County, Mississippi, United States, along the Gulf of Mexico. ... Long Beach is a city located in Harrison County, Mississippi. ... Location of Gulfport in the State of Mississippi Coordinates: , Country United States State Mississippi County Harrison Founded Incorporated Government  - Mayor Brent Warr Area  - City  64. ... Biloxi Lighthouse (of 1848) Biloxi () is a city in Harrison County, Mississippi, in the U.S.. The 2000 census recorded the population as 50,644. ...


More than 11 inches of rain occurred in Hancock County, and most low-lying areas were flooded with up to 15 feet (4.6 m) of water. U.S. Highway 90, which is close to the shore, was broken up in many areas, and sand and debris blocked much of it. Totals say that 3,800 homes and businesses were completely destroyed. As Camille came ashore, it passed over Ship Island, off the coast of Mississippi; Camille's strong storm surge and torrential rains literally split the island in two: the body of water between West Ship Island and East Ship Island is now called "Camille's Cut". Hancock County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... United States Highway 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... Ship Island is a famous tourist spot off the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, part of Gulf Islands National Seashore. ... Welcome sign to Ship Island and Gulf Islands National Seashore with one of its common squalls brewing in the background. ... Welcome sign to Ship Island and Gulf Islands National Seashore with one of its common squalls brewing in the background. ...


In addition, one of Frank Lloyd Wright's waterfront houses for W. L. Fuller, in Pass Christian, was completely destroyed by Hurricane Camille.[8] Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the worlds most prominent and influential architects. ...


The Hurricane Party

Richelieu Apartments before Camille
Richelieu Apartments before Camille
Richelieu Apartments After Camille
Richelieu Apartments After Camille

One persistent legend about Camille states that a hurricane party was held on the third floor of the Richelieu Manor Apartments in Pass Christian, Mississippi, in the path of the eyewall as it made landfall. The high storm surge flooded and destroyed the building, and there was only one survivor to tell of the story of the others. Who the survivor is, how many party guests there were, and just how far the sole survivor was swept by the storm varies with the retelling. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1184 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The NOAA emblem is the property of the U.S. Government and a trademark of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1184 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The NOAA emblem is the property of the U.S. Government and a trademark of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution (1796 × 1184 pixel, file size: 1,013 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The NOAA emblem is the property of the U.S. Government and a trademark of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution (1796 × 1184 pixel, file size: 1,013 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The NOAA emblem is the property of the U.S. Government and a trademark of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Pass Christian (pronounce [1]) is a city in Harrison County, Mississippi, United States, along the Gulf of Mexico. ...


In reality, most of the people that stayed in the Richelieu Apartments survived, but there is heavy debate on whether or not there was a party. Interviews from the local TV station, WLOX, interviewed people who claimed to have stayed in the Richelieu Apartments. Among the survivors was the manager, who supposedly stayed in the Manager's Office while the party was going on. The wall of the office collapsed, causing water to come in. The manager claimed to have used a nearby object to stay afloat on the water until the storm receded. Other people, however, have claimed that the residents, exhausted from preparing the town to weather the storm, took refuge in the building not out of recklessness, but because it was believed to be one of the sturdiest buildings in the area. Survivor Ben Duckworth is quoted in Hurricane Camille: Monster Storm of the Gulf Coast as stating that the Richelieu was a designated civil defense air-raid shelter. However, their faith in the building's sturdiness was unfounded, as it was completely demolished by the storm. Twenty-three people are known to have stayed in the Richelieu Apartments during the hurricane, of whom eight died. WLOX is the ABC affiliate for Biloxi and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. ... The old United States civil defense logo. ... It has been suggested that Fallout Shelter be merged into this article or section. ...


The tale of the lone survivor and the party appears to have originated with survivor Mary Ann Gerlach. Other survivors, including Duckworth and Richard Keller have expressed irritation at the story.[9][10] "The hurricane party never happened, nor were the number of deaths associated with the apartment inhabitants accurate," says Pat Fitzpatrick, Mississippi State University professor and author of Hurricanes: A Reference Handbook.[11] Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles northeast of Jackson and 23 miles west of Columbus. ...


Ohio Valley and the Virginias

Camille caused moderate rainfall in Tennessee and Kentucky of up to 5 inches, helping to relieve a drought in the area.[citation needed] Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


While moving through Virginia and West Virginia, Camille dropped torrential rainfall of 12 to 20 inches, with one unofficial report of 31 inches. Most of the rainfall occurred in Virginia during a 3-5 hour period on August 20.[12] The flooding led to overflown rivers in the 2 states, with the highest amounting being the James River in Richmond with a peak crest of 28.6 feet. Many rivers in Virginia and West Virginia set records for peak flood stages, causing numerous mudslides along mountainsides. In the mountain slopes between Charlottesville and Lynchburg, more than 10 inches of rain fell in a course of 12 mere hours. In the same time, Nelson County recorded 27 inches of rain. Flooding was so catastrophic that all communications were cut off from the rest of the state. Because the hurricane was expected to quickly dissipate, few were prepared for the flash flooding.[12] The ensuing flash flood and mudslide killed 153 people. In Nelson County alone, 133 bridges were washed out, while some entire communities were under water.[citation needed] The major flooding that occurred downstream cut off all communications between Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley. Waynesboro on the South River saw eight feet of water downtown, and Buena Vista had more than five feet. Throughout Virginia and West Virginia, Camille destroyed 349 houses, 83 trailers, 730 farm buildings, and 96 buildings. 4,128 families were affected by the hurricane in the area, and total damage amounted to $140.8 million (1969 USD, $747 million 2005 USD).[2][12][13] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Princess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III of England. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Nelson County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... Downtown Waynesboro showing Main Street, as well as the scar on the mountain prior to being seeded. ... The South River is one of the two main tributaries of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River. ... Buena Vista, Virginia 6002 happy citizens and 3 old grouches Buena Vista, pronounced [ËŒbjunəˈvɪstÉ™] by locals, despite the correct Spanish pronunciation of [bwenaˈßista], is an independent city located within the confines of Rockbridge County in the state of Virginia. ...


Aftermath

Damage from Camille

The response after the storm involved many federal state and local agencies and volunteer organizations. The main organization for coordinating the federal response to the disaster was the Office of Emergency Preparedness which provided $76 million (1969 USD, $403 million 2005 USD)[2] to administer and coordinate disaster relief programs. Food and shelter were available the day after the storm. On August 19 portions of Mississippi and Louisiana were declared major disaster areas and became eligible for federal disaster relief funds. [14] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1188 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1188 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Major organizations contributing to the relief effort included the Federal Power Commission which helped fully return power to affected areas by November 25, 1969. The Coast Guard (then under the Department of Transportation), Air Force, Army, Army Corps of Engineers, Navy and Marine Corps all helped with evacuations, search and rescue, clearing debris and distribution of food. The Department of Defense contributed $34 million (1969 USD, $180 million 2005 USD)[2] and 16,500 military troops overall to the recovery. The Department of Health provided 4 million dollars towards medicine, vaccines and other health related needs. [14] is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...

A large, antebellum mansion destroyed by the high winds and storm surge.
A large, antebellum mansion destroyed by the high winds and storm surge.

Long term re-development was overseen by the Department of Commerce, which contributed $30 million (1969 USD, $159 million 2005 USD)[2] towards planned and coordinated redevelopment of affected areas. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 523 pixelsFull resolution (1812 × 1184 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 523 pixelsFull resolution (1812 × 1184 pixel, file size: 1. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ...


The devastation of Camille inspired the implementation of the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. After the storm, many Gulf Coast residents commented that hurricane warnings were not clear enough in conveying the expected intensity of the coming storm. The Saffir-Simpson scale offered a much more concise statement of storm intensity than barometric pressure and wind speed measurements, and veterans of previous hurricanes could analogize the power of the approaching storm to those they had experienced.[15] The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ...


In a 1999 report on Hurricane Camille sponsored by the NOAA Coastal Services Center, the authors concluded: "With Camille, the preparations for the event and the response were based on processes put in place long before the storm made landfall. Coordination between government agencies as well as with state and local officials was enhanced because of preexisting plans." [14] This article is about the year. ...


One small compensation was that recovery from flood damage in Nelson County, Virginia led to the discovery of the Ginger Gold apple in the orchards of Clyde Harvey.[16] Nelson County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Ginger Gold is a yellow apple variety which entered commerce in the 1980s, though the original seedling dates from the late 1960s. ...


Retirement

See also: List of retired Atlantic hurricanes

The name Camille was retired after the 1969 season due to the major destruction and death in much of the Southern United States. A replacement name was never chosen, as a new list of names was created. This is a list of all Atlantic hurricanes that have had their names retired. ...


Comparisons to Hurricane Katrina

Side-by-side comparison of Hurricane Camille (left) and 2005's Hurricane Katrina, with wider eyewall and outer-band tornadoes in Georgia (click on image to enlarge).
Side-by-side comparison of Hurricane Camille (left) and 2005's Hurricane Katrina, with wider eyewall and outer-band tornadoes in Georgia (click on image to enlarge).

Comparisons between Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 season and Camille are inevitable because of their similar strengths and nearly identical landfall locations. Before Katrina, Camille was considered to be the "benchmark" against which all Gulf Coast hurricanes were measured. Katrina was weaker than Camille at landfall but substantially larger, which led to both a broader and a larger storm surge. Katrina was described by those that experienced Camille as "much worse" - not only because of the massive storm surge, but from the fact that Katrina pounded the Mississippi coast for a longer period of time. Camille also drew part of its record storm surge from adjacent coastal waters; Lake Borgne and Lake Pontchartrain actually receded, sparing the city of New Orleans from flooding. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Eye of Typhoon Odessa, Pacific Ocean, August 1985 The eyewall is the region of a tropical cyclone with the strongest winds, the tallest clouds, and the heaviest rain. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ... Lake Borgne is a lagoon in eastern Louisiana of the Gulf of Mexico. ... Lake Pontchartrains north shore at Fontainebleau State Park near Mandeville, Louisiana in 2004 Lake Pontchartrain (local English pronunciation ) (French: Lac Pontchartrain, pronounced ) is a brackish lake located in southeastern Louisiana. ... NOLA redirects here. ...


Some locals argue that Katrina's death toll was made higher because those who survived Camille with no flooding and little damage believed Katrina to be less of a threat, creating a false sense of security among Camille veterans. An innkeeper at the Harbour Oaks Inn, Tony Brugger, stayed at the inn and died when his inn collapsed.[17] A popular rumor has Brugger telling a radio station during an interview that he wouldn't leave because since Camille's surge had not affected the inn, Katrina's would not either.


Records and naming

Most intense Atlantic hurricanes
Intensity is measured solely by central pressure
Rank Hurricane Season Min. pressure
1 Wilma 2005 882 mbar (hPa)
2 Gilbert 1988 888 mbar (hPa)
3 "Labor Day" 1935 892 mbar (hPa)
4 Rita 2005 895 mbar (hPa)
5 Allen 1980 899 mbar (hPa)
6 Katrina 2005 902 mbar (hPa)
7 Camille 1969 905 mbar (hPa)
Mitch 1998 905 mbar (hPa)
9 Dean 2007 906 mbar (hPa)
10 Ivan 2004 910 mbar (hPa)
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce

Diurnal (daily) rhythm of air pressure in northern Germany (black curve is air pressure) Atmospheric pressure is the pressure at any point in the Earths atmosphere. ... Lowest pressure 882 mbar (hPa; 26. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ... A millibar (mbar, also mb) is 1/1000th of a bar, a unit for measurement of pressure. ... The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit of pressure or stress (also: Youngs modulus and tensile strength). ... Lowest pressure 888 mbar (hPa; 26. ... The 1988 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1988, and lasted until November 30, 1988. ... Lowest pressure 892 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $6 million+ (1935 dollars) $82 million+ (2005 dollars) Fatalities 408 - 600 direct Areas affected Bahamas, Florida Keys, Florida Panhandle, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina Part of the 1935 Atlantic hurricane season The Labor Day Hurricane was a very compact, intense hurricane that... The 1935 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1935, and lasted until November 30, 1935. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ... Hurricane Allen was the strongest hurricane of the 1980 Atlantic hurricane season. ... First storm formed: July 31, 1980 Last storm dissipated: Nov. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ... First storm formed: July 25, 1969 Last storm dissipated: Nov. ... Lowest pressure 905 mbar (hPa; 26. ... The 1998 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1998, and lasted until November 30, 1998. ... Lowest pressure 906 mbar (hPa; 26. ... The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. ... Lowest pressure 910 mbar (hPa) Damage $19. ... The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 2004, and lasted until November 30, 2004. ...

Records

Camille produced the seventh lowest official barometric pressure ever recorded in the Atlantic basin, at 905 mbar. Minimum pressure at landfall in Mississippi was 909 mbar; the only hurricane to hit the United States with a lower pressure at landfall was the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. A reconnaissance flight indicated a pressure of 901 mbar,[18] but this pressure was not verified, and remains unofficial pending reanalysis. The wind speed of Camille can only be approximated, as no meteorological equipment survived the extreme conditions at landfall, but Camille is estimated to have had sustained winds of 200 mph (325 km/h) at landfall, with gusts exceeding 215 mph (346 km/h).[18] Before Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Camille likely had the highest storm surge measured in the United States, at over 24 feet (7.3 meters).[19] Lowest pressure 892 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $6 million+ (1935 dollars) $82 million+ (2005 dollars) Fatalities 408 - 600 direct Areas affected Bahamas, Florida Keys, Florida Panhandle, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina Part of the 1935 Atlantic hurricane season The Labor Day Hurricane was a very compact, intense hurricane that... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ...


The 24-foot storm surge quoted by the Army Corps of Engineers was based on high water marks inside surviving buildings, of which there were but three. Prior to the collapse of the Richelieu Apartments, Ben Duckworth shined a flashlight down a stairwell and found the water within one step of the third-story floor; this establishes a surge height of 28 feet at that spot at that time. About 15 minutes later, the building collapsed and the evidence vanished with it.


In addition, Camille forced the Mississippi River to flow backwards for a river-distance of 125 miles (from its mouth to a point north of New Orleans). The river further backed up for an additional 120 miles, to a point north of Baton Rouge.[20] For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Nickname: Motto: Authentic Louisiana at every turn Location of Baton Rouge in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish East Baton Rouge Parish Founded 1699 Incorporated 16 January 1817 Government  - Mayor Melvin Kip Holden (D) Area  - City  79. ...


Naming

In 1969 the naming conventions for hurricanes were not strictly controlled as they are today. There were only three requirements: the name had to be female (male names were not used at that time), the names had to remain in alphabetical order, and the name could not have been retired. John Hope, a meteorologist at the National Hurricane Center, had a daughter who had just graduated from high school. He added her name — Camille — to the list of storm names for the year, having no way of knowing that the storm bearing her name would become infamous.[21] Camille Hope is the wife of U.S. Rep. Jim Marshall of Georgia. John Raymond Hope (May 4, 1919-June 13, 2002) was an American meteorologist who specialized in hurricane forecasting and was an on-air personality on The Weather Channel. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... National Weather Service Logo The U.S. National Hurricane Center is the division of National Weather Services Tropical Prediction Center responsible for tracking and predicting the likely behavior of tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes. ... James Creel Jim Marshall (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician, and has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 3rd District of Georgia (map). ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tropical cyclones Portal

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x662, 320 KB) http://eol. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... This is a list of notable tropical cyclones, subdivided by basin and reason for notability. ... This is a list of notable Atlantic hurricanes, subdivided by reason for notability. ... Hurricane Isabel viewed from space This is a list of all Atlantic hurricanes that have reached Category 5, the highest classification of tropical cyclone intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. ... This is a list of all Atlantic hurricanes that have had their names retired. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

References

  1. ^ Deadliest US Hurricanes. NOAA. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g The Inflation Calculator. Retrieved on 2006-06-18.
  3. ^ Harrison County Camille Information. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  4. ^ The Deadliest, Costliest, and Most Intense United States Hurricanes from 1900 to 2000 (And Other Frequently Requested Hurricane Facts). Retrieved on 2007-08-27.
  5. ^ U. S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service. History of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry in Southern Louisiana Interim Report: Volume I: Papers on the Evolving Offshore Industry. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  6. ^ Hurricane Camille; Storm of the Century. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  7. ^ New Orleans Hurricane Risk. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  8. ^ Frank-Lloyd-Wright.com, FLW Designs (2005) "Enduring Legacy" (bottom).. Retrieved on 2006-09-04.
  9. ^ UPM Philip Hearn Interview. University Press Mississippi. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  10. ^ Kat Bergeron. Correcting the facts and debunking the myths of Camille. The Sun Herald. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  11. ^ "Hurricane Reference Guide. Mississippi State University. Retrieved on 2005-03-30.
  12. ^ a b c 1969 Monthly Weather Review (PDF 17.8 MB). NOAA. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  13. ^ Virginia's Weather History. "Virginia Dept. of Emergency Management. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  14. ^ a b c Thirty Years After Hurricane Camille: Lessons Learned, Lessons Lost. University of Colorado. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  15. ^ "Category Five": How a Hurricane Yardstick Came to Be. National Geographic. Retrieved on 2006-07-30.
  16. ^ "Hurricane Camille Leaves a New Apple in Nelson C." Charlottesville Daily Progress, September 18 1992
  17. ^ "Storm victim has no time to grieve". The Clarion Ledger. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  18. ^ a b NWS Jackson Special Weather Summary. NOAA. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  19. ^ Hurricane Resources. US Army Corps of Engineers. Retrieved on 2006-05-28.
  20. ^ Howard, Judith A. Category 5 : The Story of Camille. University of Michigan Press, 109. ISBN 0-472-11525-1. 
  21. ^ John Hope a North Georgia Notable. Golden Ink. Retrieved on 2006-05-29.

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External links


is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Retired Atlantic hurricanes
1950s | Carol | Edna | Hazel | Connie | Diane | Ione | Janet | Audrey | Gracie
1960s | Donna | Carla | Hattie | Flora | Cleo | Dora | Hilda | Betsy | Inez | Beulah | Camille
1970s | Celia | Agnes | Carmen | Fifi | Eloise | Anita | David | Frederic
1980s | Allen | Alicia | Elena | Gloria | Gilbert | Joan | Hugo
1990s | Diana | Klaus | Bob | Andrew | Luis | Marilyn | Opal | Roxanne | Cesar | Fran | Hortense | Georges | Mitch | Floyd | Lenny
2000s | Keith | Allison | Iris | Michelle | Isidore | Lili | Fabian | Isabel | Juan | Charley | Frances | Ivan | Jeanne | Dennis | Katrina | Rita | Stan | Wilma
Tropical cyclones of the 1969 Atlantic hurricane season
C
G
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
TD TS 1 2 3 4 5

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hurricane Camille - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2295 words)
Hurricane Camille was a Category 5 hurricane that struck the United States near the mouth of the Mississippi River on the night of August 17 during the 1969 Atlantic hurricane season, causing catastrophic damage.
Camille started as a tropical wave that left the coast of Africa on August 5, but it wasn't until August 9 that it was designated a tropical disturbance, 480 miles east of the Leeward Islands.
Camille produced the seventh lowest official barometric pressure ever recorded in the Atlantic basin, a scant 905 mbar; the only hurricane to hit the United States with a lower pressure at landfall was the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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