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Encyclopedia > Hurling


Hurling (in Irish, iománaíocht or iomáint) is an outdoor team sport of ancient Gaelic origin, administered by the Gaelic Athletic Association, and played with sticks and a ball. The game, played primarily in Ireland, has prehistoric origins and is the world's fastest field team sport in terms of game play.[1] One of Ireland's native Gaelic games, it shares a number of features with Gaelic football, such as the field and goals, number of players, and much terminology. There is a similar game for women called camogie. Pub Sign at St. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ...


The object of the game is for players to use a wooden axe-shaped stick called a hurley or hurl (in Irish a camán, pronounced "kam-awn") to hit a small ball called a sliotar (pronounced "slitt-er") between the opponents' goalposts either over the crossbar for one point, or under the crossbar into a net guarded by a goalkeeper for one goal, which is equivalent to three points. Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A hurley (Irish: camán) is a wooden stick approx one metre (three feet) long with a flattened, curved end, used to hit a sliotar (leather ball) in the Irish sport of hurling. ... Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A sliotar (or sliothar) is a hard ball about the size of a tennis ball, consisting of a cork core covered by two pieces of leather stitched together. ... The following are the positions in the Gaelic sports of Gaelic football, hurling and camogie. ...


The ball can be caught in the hand and carried for not more than four steps, struck in the air, or struck on the ground with the stick. It can be kicked or slapped with an open hand (the hand pass) for short-range passing. A player who wants to carry the ball for more than three steps has to bounce or balance the ball on the end of the stick, and the ball can only be handled twice while in his possession.


Side to side shouldering is allowed although body-checking or shoulder-charging is illegal. No protective padding is worn by players, and although a plastic protective helmet with faceguard is recommended, this is not mandatory for players over 19.

Contents

Statistics

Hurling stick (hurley) and ball (sliotar) (Irish Camán agus sliotar)
Hurling stick (hurley) and ball (sliotar) (Irish Camán agus sliotar)
  • A team comprises 15 players, or "hurlers."
  • The hurley or hurl (hurl), or camán, is generally 70–100 cm (32–36 inches) in length
  • The goalkeeper's hurley usually has a bás (the flattened, curved end) twice the size of other players' hurleys to provide some advantage against the fast moving sliotar.
  • The ball, known as a sliotar, has a cork center and a leather cover; it is between 23 and 25 cm in circumference, and weighs between 100 and 130 g
  • A good strike with a hurley can propel the ball up to 150 km/h (93 mph) in speed and 100 m (305 ft) in distance.
  • A ball hit over the bar is worth one point. A ball that is hit under the bar is called a goal and is worth three points.
  • The player may wear protection, usually a helmet and/or a special kind of glove called an ashguard.

Download high resolution version (1437x1003, 969 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1437x1003, 969 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A hurley (Irish: camán) is a wooden stick approx one metre (three feet) long with a flattened, curved end, used to hit a sliotar (leather ball) in the Irish sport of hurling. ... Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A sliotar (or sliothar) is a hard ball about the size of a tennis ball, consisting of a cork core covered by two pieces of leather stitched together. ...

Rules

Playing field

A standard hurling pitch
A standard hurling pitch

Hurling is played on a pitch approximately 137 m long and 82 m wide The goals at each end of the field are formed by two posts, which are usually 6 m high, set 6.4 m apart, and connected 2.44 m above the ground by a crossbar. A net extending in back of the goal is attached to the crossbar and lower goal posts. The same pitch is used for Gaelic football; the GAA, which organises both sports, decided this to facilitate dual usage. Lines are marked at 13 m, 20 m and 65 m and 45 m in gaelic football from each end-line. Shorter pitches and smaller goals are used by under-13s and younger. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ...

Teams

See also: Gaelic football and Hurling positions

Teams consist of fifteen players and they line out as below: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1823x2779, 272 KB) Layout of a Gaelic football and hurling pitch. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1823x2779, 272 KB) Layout of a Gaelic football and hurling pitch. ... The following are the positions in the Gaelic sports of Gaelic football, hurling and camogie. ...


The panel is made up of 24-30 players and 5 substitutions are allowed per game.


Timekeeping

Senior inter-county matches last 70 minutes (35 minutes a half). All other matches last 60 minutes (30 minutes a half). For age groups of under-13 or lower, games may be shortened to 50 minutes. Timekeeping is at the discretion of the referee who adds on stoppage time at the end of each half. The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ...


If a knockout game finishes in a draw, a replay is played. If a replay finishes in a draw, 20 minutes (10 minutes a side) extra time is played. If the game is still tied, another replay is played.


In club competitions replays are increasingly not used due to the fixture backlogs caused. Instead, extra time is played after a draw, and if the game is still level after that it will go to a replay.


In inter-County matches there has been a call for a dedicated time keeper, as referees can often be accused of playing enough extra time for the purpose of a draw. As draws are replayed, it constitutes a huge capital gain for the G.A.A.[citation needed]


Technical fouls

The following are considered technical fouls ("fouling the ball"):

  • Picking the ball directly off the ground (instead it must be flicked up with the hurl or the foot)
  • Throwing the ball (instead it must be "hand-passed": slapped with the open hand)
  • Going more than four steps with the ball in the hand(it may be carried indefinitely on the hurley though)
  • Catching the ball three times in a row without it touching the ground (touching the hurley does not count)
  • Putting the ball from one hand to the other
  • Hand-passing a goal or point
  • Throwing the hurley
  • Square ball: If, at the moment the ball enters "the square", the small rectangle surrounding the goal, there is already an attacking player inside, a free out is awarded.

Scoring

Scoring is achieved by sending the sliotar (ball) between the opposition's goal posts. The posts, which are at each end of the field, are "H" posts as in rugby football but with a net under the crossbar as in football. The posts are 6.4 m apart and the crossbar is 2.44 mts above the ground. Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A sliotar (or sliothar) is a hard ball about the size of a tennis ball, consisting of a cork core covered by two pieces of leather stitched together. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


If the ball goes over the crossbar, a point is scored and a white flag is raised by an umpire. If the ball goes below the crossbar, a goal, worth three points, is scored, and a green flag is raised by an umpire. The goal is guarded by a goalkeeper. Scores are recorded in the format {goal total} - {point total}. For example, the 1997 All-Ireland final finished: Clare 0-20 Tipperary 2-13. Thus Clare won by "twenty points to two thirteen" (20 to 19). 2-0 would be referred to as "two goals", never "two zero". 0-0 is said "no score". For the state of play in the 2008 Championship, see All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship 2008. ... :For more details of Clare GAA see Clare Senior Club Football Championship or Clare Senior Club Hurling Championship. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ...


Tackling

Players may be tackled but not struck by a one handed slash of the stick; exceptions are two handed jabs and strikes. Jersey-pulling, wrestling, pushing and tripping are all forbidden. There are several forms of acceptable tackling, the most popular being:

  • the block, where one player attempts to smother an opposing player's strike by trapping the ball between his hurley and the opponent's swinging hurley;
  • the hook, where a player approaches another player from a rear angle and attempts to catch the opponent's hurley with his own at the top of the swing; and
  • the side pull, where two players running together for the sliotar will collide at the shoulders and swing together to win the tackle and pull really hard.

Restarting play

  • The match begins with the referee throwing the sliotar in between the four midfielders on the halfway line.
  • After an attacker has scored or put the ball wide of the goals, the goalkeeper may take a puckout from the hand at the edge of the small square. All players must be beyond the 20 m line.
  • After a defender has put the ball wide of the goals, an attacker may take a "65" from the 65 m line level with where the ball went wide. It must be taken by lifting and striking. However, the ball must not be taken into the hand but struck whilst the ball is lifted.
  • After a player has put the ball over the sideline, the other team may take a sideline puck at the point where the ball left the pitch. It must be taken from the ground.
  • After a player has committed a foul, the other team may take a free at the point where the foul was committed. It must be taken by lifting and striking in the same style as the "65".
  • After a defender has committed a foul inside the Square (large rectangle), the other team may take a penalty from the ground from the centre of the 20 m line. Only the goalkeeper and two defenders may guard the goals. It must be taken by lifting and striking.
  • If many players are struggling for the ball and it is not clear who was fouled first, the referee may choose to throw the ball in between two opposing players.

Officials

A hurling match is watched over by 8 officials:

  • The referee
  • Two linesmen
  • Sideline Official/Standby Linesman (inter-county games only)
  • Four umpires (two at each end)

The referee is responsible for starting and stopping play, recording the score, awarding frees and booking and sending off players.


Linesmen are responsible for indicating the direction of line balls to the referee and also for conferring with the referee. The fourth official is responsible for overseeing substitutions, and also indicating the amount of stoppage time (signalled to him by the referee) and the players substituted using an electronic board. The umpires are responsible for judging the scoring. They indicate to the referee whether a shot was: wide (spread both arms), a 65 m puck (raise one arm), a point (wave white flag), or a goal (wave green flag).


The linesman is also supposed to indicate to the referee anything he may have missed, although this is a rare occurrence. The referee can over-rule any decision by a linesman or umpire.


History

A standard hurling helmet
Further information: History of Hurling

Hurling is older than the recorded history of Ireland. It dates back to at least the 13th century.[2] The game is thought to be related to the games of shinty that is played primarily in Scotland, cammag on the Isle of Man and bandy that was played formerly in England and Wales. Fragments of law predating the Brehon Laws refer to hurling and may have been written before AD 400. The tale of the Táin Bó Cuailgne (drawing on earlier legends) describes the hero Cúchulainn playing hurling at Emain Macha. Similar tales are told about Fionn Mac Cumhail and the Fianna, his legendary warrior band. Recorded references to hurling appear in many places such as the 13th century Statutes of Kilkenny and a 15th century grave slab survives in Inishowen, County Donegal[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 636 KB) My hurling helmet, I took this myself I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 636 KB) My hurling helmet, I took this myself I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The History of Hurling is long and often unclear, stretching back over three millenia. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... This article is about the country. ... The game of cammag is a Manx team sport. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Brehon Laws were statutes that governed everyday life and politics in Ireland until the Norman invasion of 1171 (the word Brehon is an Anglicisation of breitheamh (earlier brithem), the Irish word for a judge). ... Táin Bó Cúailnge (the driving-off of cows of Cooley, more usually rendered The Cattle Raid of Cooley or The Táin) is the central tale in the Ulster Cycle, one of the four great cycles that make up the surviving corpus of Irish mythology. ... Cuchulain Slays the Hound of Culain, illustration by Stephen Reid from Eleanor Hulls The Boys Cuchulain, 1904 Cúchulainn ( ) (Irish Hound of Culann; also spelled Cú Chulainn, Cú Chulaind, Cúchulain, or Cuchullain) is an Irish mythological hero who appears in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, as well... Emain Macha, (Old Irish , Emuin Macha, Modern Irish Eamhain Mhacha , Emania) known in English as Navan Fort, is an ancient monument in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. ... Fionn mac Cumhail (earlier Finn or Find mac Cumail or mac Umaill, pronounced roughly Finn mac Cool) was a legendary hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, also known in Scotland and the Isle of Man. ... In Irish mythology, the Fianna were Irish warrior-hunters who served the High King of Ireland in the 3rd century AD. Their adventures were recorded in the Fenian Cycle. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Location of Inishowen Inishowen (Irish: Inis Eoghain) is a historical peninsular region in County Donegal, and also the largest peninsula in Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ...


The Eighteenth Century is frequently referred to as "The Golden Age of Hurling." This was when members of the Anglo-Irish landed gentry kept teams of players on their estates and challenged each other's teams to matches for the amusement of their tenants. Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist church. ...


The founding of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in 1884 turned around a trend of terminal decline by organising the game around a common set of written rules. The 20th century saw greater organisation in Hurling and Gaelic Football. The all-Ireland Hurling championship came into existence along with the provincial championships. Cork, Kilkenny and Tipperary dominated hurling in the 20th century with each of these counties winning more than 20 All-Ireland titles each. Wexford, Waterford, Clare, Limerick, Offaly, Dublin, and Galway were also strong hurling counties during the 20th century. For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ...


As hurling entered the new millennium, it has remained Ireland's second most popular sport. An extended qualifier system resulted in a longer All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, but Cork and Kilkenny have come to dominate the championship and some argue that the All-Ireland has become less competitive. Pay-for-play remains controversial and the Gaelic Players Association continues to grow in strength. The inauguration of the Christy Ring Cup and Nicky Rackard Cup gave new championships and an opportunity to play in Croke Park to the weaker county teams. For the state of play in the 2008 Championship, see All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship 2008. ... The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Cork GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Cork. ... The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Kilkenny GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Cill Channaigh) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. ... The Gaelic Players Association (Irish: Cumann na n-Imreoirí Ghaelacha) or GPA is a body that represents inter county Gaelic footballers and Hurlers in Ireland. ... The Christy Ring Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 2 hurling teams, the so-called middle-ranking hurling teams in Ireland. ... The Nicky Rackard Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 3 hurling teams, the so-called teams in Ireland that would not be considered traditional hurling teams. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ...


International

Further information: Hurling Across the World

Although many hurling clubs exist worldwide, only Ireland has a national team (although it includes only players from weaker counties in order to ensure matches are competitive). It and the Scotland shinty team have played for many years with modified match rules (as with International Rules Football). The match is the only such international competition. However, competition at club level has been going on around the world since the late nineteenth century thanks to emigration from Ireland, and the strength of the game has ebbed and flowed along with emigration trends. Nowadays, growth in hurling is noted in Continental Europe, Australasia, and North America. Although many hurling clubs exist worldwide, only Ireland has a national team. ... This article is about the country. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ...


Britain

Hurling was brought to Britain by Irish immigrants in the nineteenth century. The game is administered by Britain GAA. Warwickshire GAA compete against Irish teams in the Nicky Rackard Cup. London GAA are the only non-Irish team to have won the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship (having captured the title in 1901), and still compete in the Christy Ring Cup. The Warwickshire County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Warwickshire GAA) is one of the county boards outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in Warwickshire. ... The Nicky Rackard Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 3 hurling teams, the so-called teams in Ireland that would not be considered traditional hurling teams. ... For more details see the London Senior Hurling Championship and the London Senior Football Championship The London County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Londáin) or London GAA is one of the county boards outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in... For the state of play in the 2008 Championship, see All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship 2008. ... The Christy Ring Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 2 hurling teams, the so-called middle-ranking hurling teams in Ireland. ...


North America

Further information: Canada GAA, New York GAA and North American GAA

References to hurling on the North American continent date from the 1780s in modern-day Canada concerning immigrants from County Waterford and County Kilkenny,[4] and also, in New York City. After the end of the American Revolution, references to hurling cease in American newspapers until the aftermath of the Potato Famine when Irish people moved to America in huge numbers, bringing the game with them.[5] The Canadian County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or Canada GAA, is one of the county boards of the GAA outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games all across Canada. ... The New York County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or New York GAA, is one of the county boards of the GAA in outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in the New York metropolitan area. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... County Waterford (Port Láirge in Irish) is a county in the province of Munster on the south coast of Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Kilkenny Code: KK Area: 2,061 km² Population (2006) 87,394 Website: www. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Potato famine may mean or refer to: The Irish Potato Famine (1845–1849) The Highland Potato Famine (1846 - 1857) The potato famines of the mid 19th century arose from an infestation of potato blight, Phytophthora infestans, which spread across Europe in the 1840s. ...


Newspaper reports from the 1850s refer to occasional matches played in San Francisco, Hoboken, and New York City. The first game of hurling played under GAA rules outside of Ireland was played on Boston Common in June 1886. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Hoboken is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ...


In 1888, there was an American tour by fifty Gaelic athletes from Ireland, known as the 'American Invasion.' This created enough interest among Irish Americans to lay the groundwork for the North American GAA. By the end of 1889, almost a dozen GAA clubs existed in America, many of them in and around New York City, Philadelphia, and Chicago. Later, clubs were formed in Boston, Cleveland, and many other centers of Irish America. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


In 1910, twenty-two hurlers, composed of an equal number from Chicago and New York, conducted a tour of Ireland, where they played against the County teams from Kilkenny, Tipperary, Limerick, Dublin, and Wexford. Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Kilkenny Code: KK Area: 2,061 km² Population (2006) 87,394 Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: North: Nenagh South: Clonmel Code: North: TN South: TS Area: 4,303 km² Population (2006) 149,040[[1]] County Tipperary (Contae Thiobraid Árann in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, and situated in the province of Munster. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Wexford Code: WX Area: 2,352 km² Population (2006) 131,615 Website: www. ...


Traditionally, hurling was a game played by Irish immigrants and discarded by their children. Many American hurling teams took to raising money to import players directly from Ireland. In recent years, this has changed considerably with the advent of the Internet. Outside of the traditional North American GAA cities of New York, Boston, Chicago, and San Francisco, clubs are springing up in other places where they consist of predominantly American-born players who bring a new dimension to the game and actively seek to promote it as a mainstream sport, especially Joe Maher, a leading expert at the sport in Boston.[6] Currently, the Milwaukee Hurling Club is the largest North American Hurling club, which is made of all Americans and very few Irish immigrants. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the state. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Milwaukee Hurling Club (MHC) has promoted the sport of hurling through education and game play since 1996. ...


Argentina

Irish immigrants began arriving in Argentina in the 19th century.[7]


The earliest reference to hurling in Argentina dates from the late 1880s in Mercedes, Buenos Aires. However, the game was not actively promoted until 1900 when it came to the attention of author and newspaperman William Bulfin. Under Bulfin's patronage, the Argentine Hurling Club was formed on July 15, 1900, leading to teams being established in different neighborhoods of Buenos Aires and the surrounding farming communities. Mercedes is a city in the Buenos Aires province, Argentina. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


Games of hurling were played every weekend until 1914 and received frequent coverage even from Argentina's Spanish language newspapers like La Nacion. After the outbreak of World War I, however, it became almost impossible to obtain hurleys from Ireland. An attempt was made to use native Argentine mountain ash, but it proved too heavy and lacking in pliability. Although the game was revived after the end of the war, the golden age of Argentine hurling had passed. World War II finally brought the era to its close. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In the aftermath of the Second World War, immigration from Ireland slowed to a trickle. In addition, native born Irish-Argentines assimilated into the local community. The last time that hurling was played in Argentina was in 1980, when the Aer Lingus Hurling Club conducted a three week tour of the country and played matches at several locations.[8] Although the Argentine Hurling Club still exists, it has switched to playing field hockey, rugby, and soccer. A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ...


Australia and New Zealand

Further information: Australasia GAA

The earliest reference to hurling in Australia is related in the book "Sketches of Garryowen." On July 12, 1844 a match took place at Batman's Hill in Melbourne as a counterpoint to a march by the Orange Order. Reportedly, the hurling match attracted a crowd of five hundred Irish immigrants, while the Orange march shivered out of existence.[9] is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... The Orange Order is a Protestant fraternal organisation largely based in the province of Northern Ireland and in western Scotland but which has a worldwide membership. ...


In 1885, a game between two Sydney based teams took place before a crowd of over ten thousand spectators. Reportedly, the contest was greatly enjoyed despite the fact that one newspaper dubbed the game "Two Degrees Safer Than War."[10] This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


The game in Australasia is administered by Australasia GAA.


South Africa

Soldiers who served in the Irish Brigade during the Anglo-Boer War are believed to have played the game on the veldt. Immigrants from County Wicklow who had arrived to work in the explosives factory in Umbogintwini, KwaZulu-Natal formed a team c. 1915-1916. A major burst of immigration in the 1920s led to the foundation of the Transvaal Hurling Association in Johannesburg in 1928. Games were traditionally played in a pitch on the site of the modern day Johannesburg Central Railway Station every Easter Sunday after Mass. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War There were two Boer wars, one in 1880-81 and the second from October 11, 1899-1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch origin (called Boere, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South Africa that put an end to the two independent... For information on the town of Veldt, see Veldt Township, Minnesota Veld or Veldt is an open area of land, typically in South Africa or southern Africa, comparable to the Australian outback. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Wicklow Code: WW Area: 2,024 km² Population (2007) 114,676 Website: www. ... KwaZulu-Natal (often referred to as KZN) is a province of South Africa. ... This article is about the city in South Africa. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ...


In 1932, a South African hurling team sailed to Ireland to compete in the Tailteann Games, where they carried a banner donated by a convent of Irish nuns in Cape Town. On their arrival, they were personally received by Ireland's President, Éamon de Valera. The Tailteann Games were an ancient sporting event held in Ireland in honor of Queen Tailte. ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area [2]  - Total 2,454. ... Éamon de Valera[1][2] (IPA: ) (Irish: ) (born Edward George de Valera 14 October 1882 – 29 August 1975) was one of the dominant political figures in 20th century Ireland. ...


South African hurling continued to prosper until the outbreak of World War II, which caused immigration from Ireland to cease and made it impossible to import equipment. Games of hurling and Gaelic football were occasionally sponsored by the Christian Brothers schools in Boksburg and Pretoria well into the 1950s. Both games have all but ceased to be played.[11] Look up South Africa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Government South Africa Government Online official government site Parliament of South Africa official site Statistics South Africa official government site News AllAfrica. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Logo of the Christian Brothers, adopted in January 2006. ... Boksburg is a city on the East Rand of Gauteng, South Africa. ... Motto: Praestantia Praevaleat Pretoria (May Pretoria Be Pre-eminent In Excellence) Country Province Established 1855 Area  - Total 1,644 km² (634. ...


Quotes

"Yesterday, Tuesday, a hurling match took place in the Phoenix Park, which was honored with the presence of Her Excellency, the Countess of Westmoreland, and several of the nobility and gentry, besides a vast concourse of spectators. Much agility and athletic contention was afforded, until the spectators forced into the playing ground. Colonel Lennox, Mr. Daly, and several other gentlemen, most obligingly used their endeavours to prevent any interruption to the players, but to no effect. This active contest ended without either side claiming triumph and remains to be yet decided."[12] A report from the Dublin newspaper Hibernian Journal, 17 October 1792. Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located 3 km to the north west of Dublin city centre in Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


"On Christmas Day and during the Christmas season we used to have hurley matches, and the whole village used to be mixed up in the game. Two men would be chosen, one from each side, for captains. Each of them used to call up man by man in turns until all who were on the strand were distributed in the two sides. We had hurleys and a ball. The game was played on the white strand without shoes or stockings, and we went in up to our necks whenever the ball went into the sea. Throughout the Twelve Days of Christmas time there wasn't a man able to drive his cow to the hill for the stiffness of his back and his bones; a pair or so would have a bruised foot, and another would be limping on one leg for a month."[13] --Tomás Ó Criomhthain reminiscing about his youth on Great Blasket Island in the years before the regularisation of hurling rules. Translated by Robin Flower. Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about the religious period from Christmas to Epiphany. ... Tomás Ó Criomhthain (Thomas O’Crohan) (1856-1937) was a native of the Irish-speaking Great Blasket Island two miles off the coast of Kerry in Ireland. ... Abandoned houses on Great Blasket Island The western part of Great Blasket Great Blasket (An Blascaod Mór in Irish) is the principal island of the Blaskets, County Kerry, Ireland. ... Robin Ernest William Flower (1881 - 1946) was an English poet and scholar, a Celticist and translator from the Irish language. ...


"There was a grand Hurling Match in the neighborhood of Gort in the county for a considerable sum of Money between the Counties of Galway and Clare; the Hurlers of the latter made a very handsome appearance. They marched from Gort to the Turlough, two miles (3 km) distant, preceded by the Band of Musick, a French horn, a Running Footman and a fellow in Antic or Harlequin Dress. None of the Hurlers was hurt, the greatest harmony having subsisted. The County of Clare Hurlers were elegantly entertained at Crushenehaire the Night following and a Hundred guineas was proposed to be Hurled for, but the time and place not yet agreed. The above procession closed with many Carriages and Horsemen, the numerous company at the Turlough made a fine appearance."[14] The newspaper Pue's Occurrences, October 16, 1759. Gort (Irish: Gort Inse Guaire or An Gort) is a HOLE. Gort takes its name, Gort Inse Guaire, from Guaire Aidhne, the sixth century King of Connacht and patron of St. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... “Arlecchino” redirects here. ... County Clare (Contae an Chláir in Irish) is in the Irish province of Munster. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


"27 June 1827, Feast of Saint Peter and Paul. A holiday... Hurling on the Fair Green. It was a good game. The sticks were being brandished like swords. Hurling is a war-like game. The west side won the first match and the east the second. You could hear the sticks striking the ball from one end of the Green to the other. I was watching from the top end myself with Doctor Céatinn and two priests. The well-to-do young men and women were strolling up and down the Green and on the level causeway in the center."[15] From the Irish language diaries of Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin, a 19th century schoolmaster and politician from Callan, County Kilkenny. Translated by Tomás de Bhaldraithe. is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... St Peter redirects here. ... St. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... See Diary (novel) for the novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin (May 1780 Killarney, County Kerry-1838 Callan, County Kilkenny) was an Irish language author, linen draper, politician, and one time hedge school master. ... Callan (Callainn in Irish) is one of the largest towns in County Kilkenny in the Republic of Ireland. ... Tomás de Bhaldraithe (December 14, 1916 - April 24, 1996) was an Irish language scholar and lexicographer born Thomas MacDonagh Waldron in Limerick. ...


Major hurling competitions

The counties of Ireland, coloured by dominant sport. The blue counties are hurling's heartland, hurling and Gaelic football are equally popular in the green counties, while hurling is a minor sport in the yellow counties.
Further information: GAA Competitions

Image File history File links Countieshf. ... Image File history File links Countieshf. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Dual county is a term used in gaelic games to describe a county that competes at a similar level in both hurling and gaelic football. ... GAA Competitions or Gaelic Athletic Association Competitions are competitive events which are organised either by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) on its own or in association with other organisations in which Gaelic Games or a set of compromised rules are played // International Rules - An annual two-game series played between... For the state of play in the 2008 Championship, see All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship 2008. ... The Munster Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Munster Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in the province of Munster in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The Leinster Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Leinster Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in the province of Leinster in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The Ulster Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Ulster Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in the province of Ulster in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The Connacht Senior Hurling Championship was the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in the province of Connacht in Ireland. ... The National Hurling League (known for sponsorship reasons as the Allianz National Hurling League) is a hurling tournament held annually between the county teams of Ireland, under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... The Christy Ring Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 2 hurling teams, the so-called middle-ranking hurling teams in Ireland. ... The Nicky Rackard Cup is in effect a competition for the Division 3 hurling teams, the so-called teams in Ireland that would not be considered traditional hurling teams. ... The All-Ireland Senior Club Hurling Championship is an annual hurling tournament played between hundreds of senior hurling clubs in Ireland. ... The Leinster Flag For the Gaelic football equivalent, see Leinster Senior Club Football Championship. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Under-21 Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Erin Under-21 Hurling Championship) is the premier knockout competition for players aged between 18 and 21 in the game of hurling played in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association For the Senior equivelant see: Leinster Senior Hurling Championship The Leinster U-21 Hurling Championship or for sponsorship reasons the Erin Leinster Under - 21 Hurling Championship is an U-21 hurling tournament. ... The All-Ireland Minor Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the ESB Minor Hurling Championship) is the premier knockout competition for the youngest competitors of the game of hurling played in Ireland. ... Paul Dunne holds An Corn Cuailgne after his 2003 victory. ... Féile na nGael is GAA club based on an Irish festival held to promote Gaelic sports of Hurling, Camogie and Handball in which both boys and girls under 14 years of age from across Ireland represent their local GAA club in a competion. ... Composite rules Shinty/Hurling (sometimes known simply as Shinty/Hurling or, particularly in Ireland, compromise rules) is a hybrid sport which was developed to facilitate international representative matches between shinty players and hurling players. ...

Notable former players

Denis Joseph D.J. Carey (born November 1970) is a forward for Kilkenny in the sport of hurling. ... The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Kilkenny GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Cill Channaigh) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... Nicholas J. English (born 1962), better known as Nicky English, is a retired Irish hurling manager and former player. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Waterford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Pórt Láirge) or Waterford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Waterford. ... Edward Peter (Eddie) Keher (born November 11, 1941) is a former Irish sportsperson who played hurling for Kilkenny and has gained iconic status in the sport. ... The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Kilkenny GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Cill Channaigh) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. ... Mick Mackey (1912 - 1982) was a famous Irish sportsperson who played hurling for County Limerick. ... The Limerick County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Luimneach) or Limerick GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Limerick. ... (Nicholas) Nicky Rackard (1922-1976) was an Irish sportsperson. ... For more information see Wexford Senior Club Hurling Championship or Wexford Senior Club Football Championship. ... Nicholas Christopher Christy Ring (12 October 1920 - 2 March 1979) was a famous Irish sportsman who played hurling for Cork in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. ... The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Cork GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Cork. ... Brian Whelehan (born August, 1971) is a current Irish sportsperson who played hurling for Offaly in the 1990s and 2000s. ... The Offaly County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Uíbh Fhailí) or Offaly GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Offaly. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Cork GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Cork. ... Tony Reddin was a famous Irish sportsperson who played hurling for Tipperary in the 1940s and 1950s. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... Ken Hogan (born 1963) is a former Irish sportsperson who played senior hurling with Tipperary in the 1980s and 1990s. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ...

Notable current players

Eugene Cloonan (born 22 December 1978) is a former Irish sportsperson. ... :For more details of Galway GAA see Galway Senior Club Football Championship or Galway Senior Club Hurling Championship. ... Brendan Cummins may refer to: Brendan Cummins (Tipperary hurler), Tipperary hurler Brendan Cummins (Cork hurler), Cork hurler Category: ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... Damien Fitzhenry is an Irish sportsman. ... For more information see Wexford Senior Club Hurling Championship or Wexford Senior Club Football Championship. ... See also the Waterford hurler, Eoin Kelly Eoin Kelly (born 6 January 1982) is an Irish sportsman. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Waterford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Pórt Láirge) or Waterford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Waterford. ... Seán Óg Ó hAilpín was born on May 22, 1977 and is a Republic of Ireland sportsman. ... The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Cork GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Cork. ... Dan Shanahan (born 4 January 1977) is an Irish sportsperson. ... The Waterford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Pórt Láirge) or Waterford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Waterford. ... Henry Shefflin (born 1 November 1979) is an Irish sportsperson. ... The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Kilkenny GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Cill Channaigh) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. ... :For more details of Galway GAA see Galway Senior Club Football Championship or Galway Senior Club Hurling Championship. ... Andrew OShaughnessy (born 1984) is an Irish sportsperson. ... This article is about the city. ...

See also

// A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ...

References

  1. ^ New York Times: WHAT'S DOING IN; Dublin. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  2. ^ THE EVOLUTION OF GAELIC SPORTS. Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  3. ^ Roger Hutchinson, "Camanachd! The Story of Shinty", pages 27, 28.
  4. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", page 85.
  5. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", pages 97-98
  6. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", pages 85-127.
  7. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", page 129.
  8. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", Chapter 7, "Hurling in Argentina", pages 129-137
  9. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash on Foreign Fields", page 139.
  10. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash in Foreign Fields", pages 139-140.
  11. ^ Seamus J. King, "The Clash of the Ash in Foreign Fields, Chapter 9 "The Game in South Africa", pages 147-151.
  12. ^ Seamus J. King, "A History of Hurling", page 18.
  13. ^ From "The Islandman", by Tomas O'Crohan, pages 133-134.
  14. ^ Quoted in Seamus J. King's "A History of Hurling, page 25.
  15. ^ Humphrey O'Sullivan, "The Diary of an Irish Countryman", Mercier Press, 1979, Reissued 2007.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mercier Press is an Irish publisher based in Douglas, Cork (city), Ireland. ...

Further reading

  • Seamus J. King, A History of Hurling, 2005.
  • Seamus J. King, The Clash of the Ash in Foreign Fields; Hurling Abroad, 1998.

External links

For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Rugby league nines is a version of rugby league played with 9 players on each side. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Bold text // Rugby sevens being played at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, which was held at Melbournes Telstra Dome. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Beach handball is a team sport where two teams pass and bounce a ball trying to throw it in the goal of the opposing team. ... Dimensions of a field of field handball played with 11 players at 1936 summer olympics compared to a football field. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A game of broomball begins with a face-off Broomball is a popular recreational ice sport originating in Canada and played around the world. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... A floorball match between Sweden (yellow) and Finland (white) Floorball is a gay indoor team sport played using composite or carbon sticks with a plastic vented blade where the aim is to put a light plastic ball into the opponents goal. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Indoor field hockey is an indoor variant of traditional outdoor field hockey. ... Ringette is a team sport played on an ice surface. ... Roller Hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using skates with wheels. ... Inline hockey is a variation of roller hockey very similar to ice hockey, from which it is derived. ... Rink hockey - Hardball hockey - Hoquei em Patins Roller Hockey (Quad) is highly popular and has many names worldwide that mean the same sport. ... Road hockey or street hockey is an informal version of ice hockey (or roller hockey) played in the street, usually by children. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Adults playing kickball. ... Lapta (Russian: ) is a Russian ball game, similar to baseball. ... Oina is a Romanian sport, similar in some ways to the American baseball. ... Over-the-line is a game related to baseball and softball. ... Girls playing pesäpallo in Siilinjärvi Pesäpallo (Swedish: Boboll, also referred to as Finnish baseball) is a fast-moving ball sport thats quite often referred to as the national sport of Finland and has some presence in other countries, such as Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia, and Northern... For the movie, see Rounders (film). ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Stool ball is a historical ball game, originating in southern England, where variants are still played in some schools. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... Canoe polo (called kayak polo in some countries) is a competitive ball sport played on water, in a defined field, between two teams of 5 players, each in a kayak. ... Bike polo match in Budapest Most commonly referred to as Bike Polo, the game is similar to traditional Polo, except that bicycles are used instead of horses. ... Elephant polo is a variant of polo played whilst riding elephants. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... Segway Polo is a team sport which started to gain some measure of popularity after being played by members of the Bay Area Segway Enthusiasts Group (Bay Area SEG) in 2004. ... Yak polo (or sarlagan polo) is a Mongolian variant of the sport polo. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Fistball is a very old sport which continues to be practiced all over the world: in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashī: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök blue + börü wolf, Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Kabaddi (sometimes written Kabbadi or Kabadi) (Telugu: , Punjabi: , Marathi: , Hindi: ,Urdu: ; IPA: ) is a team sport originally from the Indian subcontinent. ... A child demonstrating sepak takraw. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... Austus is a sport which was started in Australia during World War Two when U.S. soldiers wanted to play football against the Australians. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Composite rules Shinty/Hurling (sometimes known simply as Shinty/Hurling or, particularly in Ireland, compromise rules) is a hybrid sport which was developed to facilitate international representative matches between shinty players and hurling players. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Universal football was a hybrid of Australian rules football and rugby league, trialled at the Sydney Showground in 1933. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ...

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Hurling is an outdoor ball-and-stick game played with fifteen players on a field larger than a soccer pitch.
Hurling players can catch and carry the ball in the hand, but can only pass it by hitting it with the stick, kicking it, or slapping it by the hand.
Hurling is a great game, not just because it is a great game by itself, but because it seems to illustrate the best of Irish culture -- its folksy character, its work-hard and play-hard virtues, and its community-based values.
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