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Encyclopedia > Huntsville, Alabama
Huntsville, Alabama
Nickname: "Rocket City"
Coordinates: 34°42′49″N 86°35′10″W / 34.71361, -86.58611
Country United States
State Alabama
Counties Madison, Limestone
Government
 - Mayor Loretta Spencer
Area
 - City 202.4 sq mi (323.8 km²)
 - Land 202 sq mi (323.2 km²)
 - Water 0.4 sq mi (0.6 km²)
Elevation 600 ft (193 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 168,132
 - Density 963.8/sq mi (372.14/km²)
 - Metro 368,661
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 35800–35899
Area code(s) 256
FIPS code 01-37000
GNIS feature ID 0151827
Website: http://www.hsvcity.com/
Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest.
Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest.

Huntsville is a city in Madison County in the U.S. state of Alabama, and the county seat of Madison County.[2] Huntsville is the largest city in northern Alabama in a region of a half-million people, with the city proper having 168,132 residents (2006 estimate).[1] Started with a single cabin in 1805, the city was incorporated six years later as Twickenham. However, it was renamed "Huntsville" (after first settler John Hunt) during the War of 1812, and has grown across nearby hills and along the Tennessee River, adding textile mills, then munitions factories, to become a major city, hosting the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Redstone Arsenal. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 770 KB) Summary View of downtown Huntsville, Alabama from Big Spring International Park. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. State. ... List of 67 counties in the U.S. state of Alabama: Autauga County Baldwin County Barbour County Bibb County Blount County Bullock County Butler County Calhoun County Chambers County Cherokee County Chilton County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County Coosa County Covington... Madison County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama, and is a major part of the Huntsville-Decatur Metro Area. ... Limestone County is a county of the State of Alabama. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Loretta Spencer in 2004 holds the office of mayor of Huntsville, Alabama. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 362 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (810 × 1340 pixel, file size: 243 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 362 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (810 × 1340 pixel, file size: 243 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... Decatur, Alabama (top center), along the Tennessee River, is southwest of Huntsville and north of Birmingham, along Interstate 65. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... Madison County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama, and is a major part of the Huntsville-Decatur Metro Area. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... North Alabama is a region of the U.S. state of Alabama, generally thought to include these 11 counties: Cherokee, Colbert, DeKalb, Franklin, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Marshall, Morgan, and Winston. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Materiel (from the French for material) is the equipment and supplies in Military and commercial supply chain management. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ...


Huntsville is the largest core city of the four-county large Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. The Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area is the most populated Sub-Region of North Alabama, and is the second fastest growing region in the State of Alabama, with 510,088 living within the CSA. It is also currently the 93rd largest CSA in the country. ...

Contents

As of the 2000 census, the population of Huntsville was 164,570. As of 2006 Census estimates the Huntsville Metropolitan Area had a population of 368,661 with the city proper having 168,132 residents.[1] Huntsville, and its cross-river neighbor Decatur, combine their separate metro areas to form the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2004, had a total population of 510,088. 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Decatur, Alabama (top center), along the Tennessee River, is southwest of Huntsville and north of Birmingham, along Interstate 65. ... The Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area is the most populated Sub-Region of North Alabama, and is the second fastest growing region in the State of Alabama, with 510,088 living within the CSA. It is also currently the 93rd largest CSA in the country. ...


History

First settlers

The Big Spring, basis of street plan in Twickenham (renamed in 1812 to "Huntsville").
The Big Spring, basis of street plan in Twickenham (renamed in 1812 to "Huntsville").

Huntsville is named after Revolutionary War veteran John Hunt, the first settler of the land around the Big Spring. However, Hunt did not properly register his claim, and the area was purchased by Leroy Pope, who imposed the name Twickenham on the area to honor the home village of his distant kinsman Alexander Pope. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 1041 KB) The Big Spring, namesake of Big Spring International Park in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 1041 KB) The Big Spring, namesake of Big Spring International Park in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Big Spring Park is located in downtown Huntsville, AL. It is most noted as being the site of Big Spring Jam, an annual music festival that usually occurs on the fourth weekend in September. ... LeRoy Pope (Jan 30, 1765 – June 17, 1844) was a prominent American planter, lawyer, and early settler of Madison County, Alabama. ... For other uses, see Alexander Pope (disambiguation). ...


Twickenham was carefully planned, with streets laid out on the northeast to southwest direction based on the Big Spring (see images below). However, due to anti-English sentiment during the War of 1812, the name was changed to Huntsville to honor John Hunt, who had been forced to move to other land south of the new city.


Both John Hunt and Leroy Pope were Freemasons and charter members of Helion Lodge #1.[3] Freemasons redirects here. ...


Incorporation 1811

In 1811, Huntsville became the first incorporated town in Alabama. However, the recognized "birth" year of the city is 1805, the year of John Hunt's arrival. The city's sesquicentennial anniversary was held in 1955 and the bicentennial was celebrated in 2005. For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Emerging industries

Huntsville's quick growth was from wealth generated by the cotton and railroad industries. Many wealthy planters moved into the area from Virginia, Georgia, and the Carolinas. In 1819, Huntsville hosted a constitutional convention in Walker Allen's large cabinetmaking shop. The forty-four delegates meeting there wrote a constitution for the new state of Alabama. In accordance with the new state constitution, Huntsville became Alabama's first capital when the state was admitted to the Union. This was a temporary designation for one legislative session only, and the capital was then moved to another temporary location, Cahawba, until the legislature selected a permanent capital. (Today, the capital is Montgomery.) For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Cahawba (sometimes spelled Cahaba) was the first capital of Alabama. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ...


Civil War

Bird's Eye View of 1871 Huntsville, Alabama.
Bird's Eye View of 1871 Huntsville, Alabama.

In 1855, the Memphis and Charleston Railroad was constructed through Huntsville, becoming the first railway to link the Atlantic seacoast with the Mississippi River. Huntsville initially opposed secession from the Union in 1861, but provided many men for the state's defense when Abraham Lincoln called for an invasion of the South. The 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, led by Col. Egbert J. Jones of Huntsville, distinguished itself at the Battle of Mannasas/Bull Run, the first major encounter of the American Civil War. The Fourth Alabama Infantry, which contained two Huntsville companies, were the first Alabama troops to fight in the war and were present at the end when Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox in April 1865. Eight generals of the war were born in or near Huntsville, evenly split with four on each side. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (8016x6912, 10571 KB) // Summary Part of the American Memory Map Collection Source SID File Licensing Bibliographic Information Birds eye view of the city of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama 1871. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (8016x6912, 10571 KB) // Summary Part of the American Memory Map Collection Source SID File Licensing Bibliographic Information Birds eye view of the city of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama 1871. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Memphis and Charleston Railroad completed in 1857 was the first railroad in the United States to link the Atlantic Ocean with the Mississippi River. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 35,000 32,500 Casualties 2,896 (460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing)[1] 1,982 (387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 missing)[1] For other uses... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Appomattox is a town located in Appomattox County, Virginia. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On the morning of April 11, 1862, Union troops led by General Ormsby M. Mitchel seized Huntsville to sever the Confederacy's rail communications. The Union troops were forced to retreat some months later, but returned to Huntsville in the fall of 1863 and thereafter used the city as a base of operations for the remainder of the war. While many homes and villages in the surrounding countryside were burned in retaliation for the active guerrilla warfare in the area, Huntsville itself was spared because it housed the occupying Union Army. is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Ormbsy MacKnight (or McKnight) Mitchel (July 20, 1805 – October 30, 1862) was an American astronomer and major general in the American Civil War. ...


After the Civil War

Child workers at Merrimac Mills in Huntsville, November 1910. Photographed by Lewis Hine.

After the Civil War, Huntsville became a center for cotton textile mills, such as Lincoln, Dallas and Merrimack. Each mill had its own housing community that included everything the mill workers needed (schools, churches, grocery stores, theatres, and hardware stores, all within walking distance of the mill). A twelve year old American uneducated child laborer, Furman Owens, who stated Yes I want to learn but cant when I work all the time. ... Power house mechanic working on steam pump, 1920 Lewis Wickes Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940), was an American photographer. ...


Great Depression 1930s

During the 1930s, industry declined in Huntsville due to the Great Depression. Huntsville became known as the Watercress Capital of the World[4] because of its abundant harvest in the area. Madison County led Alabama in cotton production during this time.[4] For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Species Nasturtium nasturtium-aquaticum L. Nasturtium microphyllum Boenn ex Rchb. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ...


World War II

By 1940, Huntsville was still a small quiet town with a population of only 13,150 inhabitants. This quickly changed at the onset of World War II, when Huntsville was chosen as the location of Redstone Arsenal, with its numerous munitions manufacturing plants. The Arsenal was almost closed in 1949 when it was no longer needed, but it saw new life when General H. N. Toftoy with support from Senator John Sparkman convinced the U. S. Army to choose Huntsville as the location for its missile research program. In 1950, General Toftoy brought German rocket scientist Wernher von Braun and his colleagues to Redstone Arsenal to develop what would eventually become the United States' space program. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ...


Space flight

Historic rockets in Rocket Park of the US Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama.
Historic rockets in Rocket Park of the US Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama.

On September 8, 1960, U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. (NASA had already activated this facility, which is located on Redstone Arsenal, on July 1 of that year.) Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1059 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1059 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. ... Some of the rockets in the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Huntsville is thus home to both Redstone Arsenal and the Marshall Space Flight Center, and is nicknamed "The Rocket City" for its close history with U.S. space missions. Huntsville has been important in developing space technology since the 1950s, when the German scientists headed by Dr. Wernher von Braun, brought to the United States at the end of World War II through Operation Paperclip, arrived to develop rocketry for the U.S. Army. Their work included designing the Redstone ballistic missile, a variant of which, the Juno I, carried the first U.S. satellite and astronauts into space. Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Operation Paperclip scientists pose together. ... First launched in 1953, the American Redstone rocket was a direct descendant of the German V-2. ... The Jupiter-C Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) was designed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) The vehicle consists of a modified Redstone ballistic missile with three solid-propellant upper stages. ...

The Saturn V, utilized by the Apollo program manned Moon missions, was developed from the Redstone Arsenal. Huntsville continues to play an important role in the United States' Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs. It is estimated that 1 in 13 of Huntsville's population are employed in some engineering field of work. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 325 KB) Summary This is a space shuttle model situated in the rocket park at the alabama space and rocket center. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 325 KB) Summary This is a space shuttle model situated in the rocket park at the alabama space and rocket center. ... The Space Shuttle Orbiter Pathfinder (honorary Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-098) is a Space Shuttle simulator made of steel and wood. ... Towering rockets in the Rocket Park are a daily sight for campers at U.S. Space Camp. ... For the moon designated Saturn V, see Rhea. ... This article is about the series of human spaceflight missions. ... This article is about the space vehicle. ... ISS redirects here. ...


Huntsville's economy was nearly crippled and growth came to a near standstill in the 1970s following the closure of the Apollo program, but the emergence of the Space Shuttle and the ever-expanding field of missile defense in the 1980s helped give Huntsville a resurgence that continues to this day. The city continues to be the center of rocket-propulsion research in the United States, and is home to large branches of many defense contractors. Project Apollo was a series of human spaceflight missions undertaken by the United States of America (NASA) using the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn launch vehicle, conducted during the years 1961 – 1975. ... Missile defence is an air defence system, weapon program, or technology involved in the detection, tracking, interception and destruction of attacking missiles. ... A defense contractor (sometimes called a military contractor) is a business organization or individual that provides products or services to a defense department of a government. ...


Huntsville is also the location of the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Huntsville's contributions to United States Cold War missile armament and technology earned it a "red star" designation as a target of the Soviet Union in the event of a nuclear exchange, fourth behind only New York City, Washington, DC, and NORAD.[citation needed] ATACMS missile The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) is the U.S. Army organization primarily responsible for life cycle management of army missile, helicopter, unmanned ground vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle weapon systems. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... NORAD Headquarters Building. ...


Geography

Huntsville is located at 34°42' North, 86°35' West (34.7, -86.6)[5].


According to the Huntsville Times from Tuesday April 15, 2008[6], the city now has a total area of 202 square miles (451.8 km²). Recent annexations into Limestone County have pushed Huntsville City to a total of 4.5 square miles inside Limestone County and officially abuts Huntsville to Athens, a city to the west. The Huntsville Times is the daily morning newspaper of record for the city of Huntsville, Alabama and its surrounding areas. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Limestone County is the name of several counties in the United States: Limestone County, Alabama Limestone County, Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Huntsville is located in the Tennessee River Valley. Several mesas and large hills partially surround the city. These mesas are associated with the Cumberland Plateau, and are locally called "mountains." Monte Sano (Italian for "Mountain of Health") is the most notable, and is east of the city along with Round Top (Burritt), Chapman, Huntsville, and Green Mountains. Others are Wade Mountain to the north, Rainbow Mountain to the west, and Weeden and Madkin Mountains on Redstone Arsenal in the south. Brindlee Mountain is visible in the south across the Tennessee River. A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... For other uses, see Mesa (disambiguation). ... The Cumberland Plateau includes much of eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia in the United States. ... Monte Sano is a horseshoe-shaped mountain in Madison County, Alabama beside the city of Huntsville. ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Brindley Mountain, also spelled Brindlee Mountain, is a plateau in northern Alabama. ...


As with other areas along the Cumberland Plateau, the land around Huntsville is karst in nature. Huntsville was founded around the Big Spring, which is a typical karst spring, and many caves perforate the limestone bedrock underneath the city, as is common in karst areas. The headquarters of the National Speleological Society are located in Huntsville. Karst topography occurs when a landscape is marked by underground drainage patterns. ... For other uses, see Cave (disambiguation). ... The National Speleological Society (NSS) is an organization formed in 1941 to advance the exploration, conservation, study, and understanding of caves in the United States. ...


Climate

Huntsville has a humid subtropical climate. It experiences hot, humid summers and generally mild winters, with average high temperatures ranging from 89.0 °F (31.6 C) in the summer to 49.0 °F (9.4 C) during winter. Some years, Huntsville experiences tornadoes during the spring and fall. Significant tornado events include the Super Outbreak in 1974, the more recent November 1989 Tornado Outbreak that killed 21 and injured almost 500, and the Anderson Hills Tornado that killed one and caused extensive damage in 1995. Since Huntsville is nearly 300 miles (480 km) inland, hurricanes are rarely experienced with their full force; however, many weakened tropical storms cross the area after a U.S. Gulf Coast landfall. While most winters have some measurable snow, significant snow is rare in Huntsville; but there have been some anomalies, like the 1963 New Years Day snowstorm, when 17 inches (43 cm) fell within 24 hours. Likewise, the Blizzard of 1993 and a Groundhog Day snowstorm in 1996 were substantial winter events for Huntsville. However, as of the winter of 2005-06, Huntsville has gone 10 years without any significant snowfall (>4 inches). The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita scale The November 1989 Tornado Outbreak was a destructive tornado outbreak on November 15 and 16, 1989 across a wide swath of the southern and eastern United States and into Canada. ... Note: The following is adapted from a National Weather Service report about the Anderson Hills tornado. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... ... For the movie of the same name, see Groundhog Day (film) Groundhog Day or Groundhogs Day is a traditional holiday celebrated in the United States and Canada on February 2. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high
°F (°C)
49 (9) 54 (12) 63 (17) 73 (23) 80 (27) 87 (31) 90 (32) 89 (32) 83 (28) 73 (23) 62 (17) 52 (11) 71 (22)
Average low
°F (°C)
30
(-1)
33 (1) 41 (5) 49 (9) 58 (14) 65 (18) 69 (21) 68 (20) 62 (17) 50 (10) 40 (4) 33 (1) 50 (10)
Average rainfall: inches/mm 5 /
127
5 /
127
6.6
168
4.8
122
5.1
130
4.3
109
4.6
117
3.5
89
4.1
104
3.3
84
4.7 119 5.7 145 56.8 /
1443

source A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ...


Demographics

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 158,216 people living within the city limits. There are 66,742 households and 41,713 families residing in the city. The population density was 909.0 people per square mile (351.0/km²). There were 73,670 housing units at an average density of 423.3/sq mi (163.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 64.47% White, 30.21% Black or African American, 0.54% Native American, 2.22% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.66% from other races, and 1.84% from two or more races. 2.04% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 66,742 households out of which 27.6% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.5% are married couples living together, 13.7% have a female householder with no husband present, and 37.5% are non-families. 32.3% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.2% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.29 and the average family size is 2.91.


Huntsville, Alabama Demographic Distribution

Age
<18
18-24
25-44
45-64
65+
Distribution %
23.1
10.7
29.3
23.4
13.4

Huntsville, Alabama Sex Ratio & Income Distribution

Median Age = 37
Sex Ratio F:M = 100:92.8
Sex Ratio age 18+ F:M = 100:89.7
Median Income = 41,074
Family Median Income = 52,202
Male Median Income = 40,003
Female Median Income = 26,085
Per capita Income = 24,015
Percent Below poverty = 12.8
Age < 18 Below Poverty = 18.7
Age 65+ Below Poverty = 9.0

This article is about the statistical concept. ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...

Politics and government

Huntsville's Administration Building, also known as City Hall
Huntsville's Administration Building, also known as City Hall

The current mayor of Huntsville is Loretta Spencer, who was elected in 1996 and is the first female mayor of the city. The city has a five-member/district City Council. The current members are: District 1 (Northwest)- Richard Showers, Sr.; District 2 (East)- Mark Russell (President); District 3 (Southeast)- Sandra Moon; District 4 (Southwest)- Bill Kling; District 5 (West)- Glenn Watson. Council elections are "staggered", meaning that Districts 1 and 5 will have elections simultaneously with mayoral elections in 2008, while Districts 2, 3, and 4 will have elections in August 2010. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 759 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Huntsville, Alabama Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2032x1524, 759 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Huntsville, Alabama Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Loretta Spencer in 2004 holds the office of mayor of Huntsville, Alabama. ...


There are also many boards and commissions run by the city, controlling everything from schools and planning to museums and downtown development.


See also: List of mayors of Huntsville, Alabama This is a list of mayors that served the city of Huntsville, Alabama. ...


Public Safety

In 2007, Mayor Loretta Spencer combined the police, fire, and animal services departments to create the Department of Public Safety. The former chief of police, Rex Reynolds, was appointed as its director. The new department has nearly 900 employees and an annual budget of $63 million.


Fire

The Huntsville Fire Department has 18 engine companies and 4 ladder/rescue companies located in 17 stations throughout the city of Huntsville. Many Huntsville firefighters are also members of the regional Hazardous Materials and Heavy Rescue response teams. The current chief is Danny Loggins.


Police

The Huntsville Police Department has 3 precincts and 1 downtown HQ, 360 sworn officers, 150 civilian personnel, and patrols an area of 194.7+ square miles (this number has grown due to recent annexations). The current chief is Henry Reyes.


Police Academy

The Huntsville Police Academy is one of the oldest police academies in the United States. To date the Academy has completed 46 basic academies, and most recently the 47th Lateral Session. On May 8, 2006 the Huntsville Police Academy began the 47th Basic Session. Until the 47th Lateral Session, academies were held at the Old Huntsville Airport on Airport Rd. After the gradation of the 46th Session, the academy moved to the Public Safety Training Complex on Sparkman Drive, which is also home to the Huntsville Fire Academy. is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Economy

Huntsville's main economic influence is derived from aerospace and military technology. Redstone Arsenal, Cummings Research Park (CRP), and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center comprise the main hubs for the area's technology-driven economy. CRP is the second largest research park in the United States and the fourth largest in the world, and is over 38 years old. Huntsville is also home for commercial technology companies such as the network access company ADTRAN, computer graphics company Intergraph and design and manufacturer of IT infrastructure Avocent. Telecommunications provider Deltacom, Inc. and copper tube manufacturer and distributor Wolverine Tube are also based in Huntsville. Sanmina-SCI also has a large presence in the area. Forty-two Fortune 500 companies have operations in Huntsville. Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Cummings Research Park, located primarily in the city of Huntsville, Alabama is the second largest research park in the United States, and the fourth largest in the world. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... Adtran is a telecommunications equipment manufacturer based in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. It was founded in 1986 by Mark C. Smith and Lonnie McMillian. ... Intergraph was founded in 1969 as M&S Computing, Inc. ... Avocent Corporation was formed in 2000 from the merger of the world’s two largest KVM (keyboard, video and mouse) switch manufacturers: Apex and Cybex Computer Products Corporation. ... Deltacom, Inc. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...


In 2005, Forbes Magazine named the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area as 6th best place in the nation for doing business, and number one in terms of the number of engineers per total employment. In 2006, Huntsville dropped to 14th; the prevalence of engineers was not considered in the 2006 ranking. Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... The Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area is the most populated Sub-Region of North Alabama, and is the second fastest growing region in the State of Alabama, with 510,088 living within the CSA. It is also currently the 93rd largest CSA in the country. ...

Retail

Huntsville is fast becoming a regional retail center. There are many strip malls and "power centers" throughout the city. Huntsville has two malls- Madison Square Mall, built in 1984, and Parkway Place, built in 2002 on the site of the former Parkway City Mall. The city also has a lifestyle center called Bridge Street Town Centre, built in 2007, in Cummings Research Park. Another "live, work, and play" center is being constructed on the former site of the Heart of Huntsville Mall. It is to be called Constellation with ground breaking in Fall 2007 and scheduled completion by 2010. [1] Madison Square Mall is Huntsville, Alabamas largest enclosed shopping center, encompassing over 932,452 sq. ... Parkway Place is an upscale shopping mall in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Bridge Street Town Centre is an upscale 2 million sq. ... Cummings Research Park, located primarily in the city of Huntsville, Alabama is the second largest research park in the United States, and the fourth largest in the world. ...


Utilities

Electricity, water, and natural gas are all provided in Huntsville by Huntsville Utilities (HU). HU gets its power from the Tennessee Valley Authority, or TVA for short. TVA has two plants that provide electricity to the Huntsville area- Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant in Limestone County and Guntersville Dam in Marshall County. A third, Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant in Jackson County, was built in the 1980s but was never activated. Due to the rapid growth of the region, TVA has plans to eventually activate the plant. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Browns Ferry nuclear power plant is located on the Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. ... A nuclear power station. ... Limestone County is a county of the State of Alabama. ... Guntersville Lake area Lake Guntersville is located in north Alabama between Bridgeport and Guntersville. ... Marshall County is a county of the State of Alabama. ... The Tennessee Valley Authoritys unfinished Bellefonte nuclear power plant is located in Hollywood, Alabama, abandoned in 1988 after a $6 billion investment. ... Jackson County is a county of the State of Alabama. ...


Telephone service in Huntsville is provided by AT&T,Knology and Comcast . Huntsville has 2 cable providers in the city limits. They are Comcast and Knology (Mediacom in rural outlying areas). This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... Knology logo. ... Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ: CMCSA) is the largest cable television company and the second largest Internet service provider in the United States. ... Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ: CMCSA) is the largest cable television company and the second largest Internet service provider in the United States. ... Knology logo. ...


Transportation

Huntsville is served by several U.S. Highways, including 72, 231, 431 and an Interstate highway spur, I-565, that links the two cities of Huntsville and Decatur to I-65. Alabama Highway 53 also connects the city with I-65 in Ardmore, Tennessee. United States Highway 72 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 432 miles from southeast Tennesee through northern Alabama and northern Mississippi to southwest Tennessee. ... U.S. Highway 231 is a spur of U.S. Highway 31. ... U.S. Highway 431 is a spur of U.S. Highway 31. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... Interstate 565 (I-565) is a 21 mile (34 km) Interstate spur which connects Interstate 65 (I-65) near Decatur, Alabama with Huntsville, Alabama. ... Decatur is a city located in Morgan County, Alabama on the shore of the Tennessee River. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... State Route 53 runs from the Tennessee-Alabama state line near Ardmore and runs to Huntsville at a junction with US 231. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Ardmore is a city in Giles County, Tennessee, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


Public transit

Public transit in Huntsville is run by the city's Department of Parking and Public Transit. The Huntsville Shuttle runs 11 fixed routes throughout the city, mainly around downtown and major shopping areas like Memorial Parkway and University Drive and has recently expanded some of the buses to include bike racks on the front for a trial program. There is also a Tourist Trolley that makes stops at tourist attractions and shopping centers. The city also runs HandiRide, a demand-response transit system for the handicapped, and RideShare, a county-wide carpooling program. The Huntsville Shuttle fixed-route bus system began in 1990 in response to the growing population and congestion of the city of Huntsville, Alabama. ... Memorial Parkway (colloquially The Parkway or Parkway) is a major thoroughfare in Huntsville, Alabama. ...


Railroads

Huntsville has two active commercial rail lines. The mainline is run by Norfolk Southern, which runs from Memphis, TN to Chattanooga. Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ...


Another rail line, formerly part of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, successor to the Nashville, Chattanooga and Saint Louis Railroad, is being operated by HMCRA (Huntsville-Madison County Railroad Authority). The line connects to the Norfolk Southern line downtown and runs 13 miles (21 km) South, passing near Ditto Landing on the Tennessee River, and terminating at Norton Switch, near Hobbs Island. This service, in continuous operation since 1894, presently hauls freight and provides transloading facilities at its downtown depot location. Until the mid-fifties, L & N provided freight and passenger service to Guntersville and points South. The rail cars were loaded onto barges at Hobbs Island. The barge tows were taken through the Guntersville Dam & Locks and discharged at Port Guntersville. Remnants of the track supporting piers still remain in the river just upstream from Hobbs Island. The service ran twice daily. L & N abandoned the line in 1984 at which time it was acquired by the newly-created HMCRA, a State Agency. A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ...


The North Alabama Railroad Museum in Chase maintains a line once owned by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. The museum runs weekend tourist rides along a short track in Northeast Madison County. Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ...


Ports

The inland Port of Huntsville combines the Huntsville International Airport, International Intermodal Center, and Jetplex Industrial Park. The intermodal terminal transfers truck and train cargo. The port has on-site U.S. Customs and USDA inspectors and is Foreign Trade Zone No. 83. The Port of Huntsville is an inland port located in Huntsville, Alabama that consists of the: Huntsville International Airport International Intermodal Center Jetplex Industrial Park Categories: | ... FAA Official Diagram Huntsville International Airport (IATA: HSV, ICAO: KHSV, FAA LID: HSV), also known as Carl T. Jones Field, is an airport located 9 miles (14 km) southwest of the central business district of Huntsville, a city in Madison County, Alabama, United States. ... The United States Customs Service (now known as U.S. Customs and Border Protection or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. ... USDA redirects here. ... A free port (porto franco) or free zone (US: Foreign-Trade Zone) is a port or area with relaxed jurisdiction with respect to the country of location. ...


Huntsville International Airport is served by several regional and national carriers (including Delta, Northwest, US Air, Continental, United, and American) and offers non-stop flights to many airports across the Eastern U.S. However, Huntsville International gets its name because of its reputation as a cargo transport hub. Many delivery companies have hubs in Huntsville, making delivery flights to Europe, Asia, and Mexico. Port of Huntsville website FAA Official Diagram Huntsville International Airport (IATA: HSV, ICAO: KHSV, FAA LID: HSV), also known as Carl T. Jones Field, is an airport located 9 miles (14 km) southwest of the central business district of Huntsville, a city in Madison County, Alabama, United States. ...


Media and communications

Newspapers

The Huntsville Times has been Huntsville's only daily newspaper since 1996, when the Huntsville News closed. Before then, the News was the morning paper, and the Times was the afternoon paper until 2004. The Huntsville Times has a weekday circulation of 60,000, which rises to 80,000 on Sundays. The Huntsville Times is the daily morning newspaper of record for the city of Huntsville, Alabama and its surrounding areas. ...


A few alternative newspapers are available in Huntsville. The Valley Planet covers entertainment in the Huntsville area. The Redstone Rocket is a newspaper distributed throughout Redstone Arsenal's housing area covering activities on Redstone. Speakin' Out News is a weekly newspaper focused on African Americans. El Reportero is a Spanish-language newspaper for North Alabama.


Radio

Huntsville is the 113th largest radio market.[8] Huntsville's National Weather Service forecast and warning station broadcasts as KIH20. Huntsville also receives several radio stations from Birmingham and Nashville. Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ...


List of radio stations in Huntsville A complete list of radio stations licensed to places in Alabama. ...


Television

The Huntsville DMA serves 15 counties in North Alabama and 6 counties in Southern Middle Tennessee. This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


TV Stations:

WTZT-CA, ZTV11 (Channel 11), is an independent Class A television station licensed to Athens, Alabama. ... WHDF is the UPN affiliate in Northern Alabama airing on Channel 15. ... The CW Television Network, normally abbreviated to The CW, also known as The New CW in its first season of the network, is a television network in the United States launched during the 2006 television season. ... WHNT is the CBS affiliate in northern Alabama airing on UHF Channel 19; the signal also reaches counties in southern middle Tennessee. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Alabama Public Television is a network of PBS member stations serving the US state of Alabama. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Alabama Public Television is a network of educational television stations serving the US state of Alabama. ... WAAY-TV is an ABC-affiliated television station, broadcasting on channel 31 from Huntsville, Alabama. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Three Angels Broadcasting Network, or 3ABN for short, is a not-for-profit, 24-hour television and radio networks which primarily focuses on Christian and health-oriented programming. ... WAFF is the NBC television affiliate for Huntsville, Alabama. ... This article is about the television network. ... WZDX TV, FOX 54 is owned by Milton Grant and the Grant Broadcasting System II. WZDX-TV also broadcasts WB programming on its secondary digital subchannel 54-2, branded with the fictitious call letters WAWB-TV. The station began broadcasting in April 1985. ... FOX redirects here. ... WAMY-TV is the MyNetworkTV-affiliated television station for Northern Alabama. ... My Network TV (sometimes written MyNetworkTV, and unofficially abbreviated MNT or MNTV) is an upcoming television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation, which is scheduled to launch on September 5, 2006. ...

Movie theaters

There are 6 movie theaters located in Huntsville. They are:

Rave Motion Pictures, often called Rave, is a movie theater company formed in 1999. ... Regal Entertainment Group (NYSE: RGC) is North Americas largest movie theatre chain, operating 6,273 screens in 584 locations in 40 U.S. states. ... Regal Entertainment Group (NYSE: RGC) is North Americas largest movie theatre chain, operating 6,273 screens in 584 locations in 40 U.S. states. ... Some of the rockets in the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. ... Carmike Cinemas is a movie theatre corporation headquartered in Columbus, Georgia in the United States of America. ...

Feature films shot in Huntsville

A few feature films have been shot in Huntsville, including Like Moles, Like Rats (2006),[9] Air Band (2005),[10] and Constellation (2005).[11] Portions of the film SpaceCamp (1986) were filmed at Huntsville's U.S. Space and Rocket Center at the eponymous facility. The U.S. Space and Rocket Center stood in for NASA in the 1989 movie Beyond the Stars starring Martin Sheen, Christian Slater, and Sharon Stone. Parts of Tom and Huck (1995) were filmed in Cathedral Caverns, located on the outskirts of Huntsville. Following in the motif of the "Rocket City," Columbia Pictures filmed Ravagers (1979) in The Land Trust's Historic Three Caves Quarry, at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, and on location at an antebellum home located next door to Lee High School. This cult classic starred Richard Harris, Ernest Borgnine, Ann Turkel, Art Carney and Cecily Hovanes. Constellation is a film that had a limited release in 2007 after debuting in several film festivals. ... Space Camp is a 1986 movie based on a book by Patrick Bailey and Larry B. Williams and inspired by the U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Some of the rockets in the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. ... Beyond the Stars is a 1989 drama film written and directed by David Saperstein and starred Martin Sheen, Christian Slater, Sharon Stone, Olivia dAbo and F. Murray Abraham. ... Martin Sheen (born August 3, 1940) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... Christian Slater(born August 18, 1969) is an American actor. ... Sharon Vonne Stone (born March 10, 1958) is an American actress, producer, and former fashion model. ... Tom & Huck is a 1995 Disney film starring Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Brad Renfro, Joey Stinson, and Rachel Leigh Cook; it is based on Mark Twains novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. ... Cathedral Caverns State Park is located in Grant, Alabama city limits. ... For other persons named Richard Harris, see Richard Harris (disambiguation). ... Ermes Effron Borgnino or better known as Ernest Borgnine (born January 24, 1917[1][2]) is a Golden Globe-, BAFTA- and Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Ann Turkel (born July 16, 1946 in New York, USA) is an actress, dancer, singer, writer, producer and model. ... Arthur William Matthew Carney (November 4, 1918 – November 9, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American actor in film, stage, television, and radio. ...


Huntsville's legacy in the space program continues to draw film producers looking for background material for space-themed films. During the pre-production of the film Apollo 13 (1995), the cast and crew spent time at Space Camp and Marshall Space Flight Center preparing for their roles. Space Camp also garnered a mention in the film Stranger than Fiction. Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... Towering rockets in the Rocket Park are a daily sight for campers at U.S. Space Camp. ... Aerial view of the test area at Marshall Space Flight Center The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a lead NASA center for propulsion, Space Shuttle propulsion, external fuel tank, crew training and payloads, International Space Station (ISS) design and construction, for computers, networks, and information management. ... Stranger than Fiction is a 2006 American comedy-drama film. ...


Education

K-12 Education

The majority of K-12 students in Huntsville attend Huntsville City Schools.[12] Nearly 25,000 students attend Huntsville City Schools.[citation needed] There are 29 elementary schools, 12 middle schools, and 7 high schools. Included in those numbers are 2 magnet elementary schools (The Academy for Academics and Arts and the Academy for Science and Foreign Language), 3 magnet middle school (Williams Technology, The Academy for Academics and Arts, and the Academy for Science and Foreign Language), and 2 magnet high schools (New Century Technology and Lee). About 21 private, parochial, and religious schools also serve students ages pre-K-12.


Elementary Schools

Public [2]
  • Blossomwood Elementary
  • Chaffee Elementary
  • Challenger Elementary
  • Chapman Elementary
  • East Clinton Elementary
  • Farley Elementary
  • Hampton Cove Elementary
  • Highlands Elementary
  • Jones Valley Elementary
  • Lakewood Elementary
  • Lincoln Elementary
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary
  • McDonnell Elementary
  • Monte Sano Elementary
  • Montview Elementary
  • Morris Elementary
  • Mountain Gap Elementary
  • Providence K-8
  • Ridgecrest Elementary
  • Rolling Hills Elementary
  • Terry Heights Elementary
  • University Place Elementary
  • Weatherly Elementary
  • West Huntsville Elementary
  • West Mastin Lake Elementary
  • Whitesburg Elementary
  • Williams K-8
Private/Religious
  • Faith Christian Academy K-12 [3]
  • Greengate School for Dyslexia [4]
  • Hampton Cove Christian Academy K-3 [5]
  • Holy Family School [6]
  • Oakwood Elementary [7]
  • Providence Classical School [8]
  • Schola Maxima [9]
  • Valley Fellowship Christian Academy [10]
  • Whitesburg Christian Academy [11]

Middle Schools

Public [12]
  • Challenger Middle
  • Chapman Middle
  • Davis Hills Middle
  • Ed White Middle
  • Hampton Cove Middle
  • Huntsville Middle
  • Mountain Gap Middle
  • Providence K-8
  • Stone Middle
  • Westlawn Middle
  • Whitesburg Middle
  • Williams Technology Middle School

High Schools

Public [13]
  • Huntsville High School [17]
  • J. O. Johnson High School [18]
  • Lee High School [19]
  • New Century Technology High School [20]
  • Seldon Center [21]
Private/Religious
  • Valley Fellowship Christian Academy [28]
  • Westminster Christian Academy [29]
  • Whitesburg Christian Academy [30]
  • Islamic Academy Of Huntsville

Virgil I. Grissom High School is a public 9th through 12th grade high school in Huntsville, Alabama with approximately 2000 students. ... Catholic High School is a coed 9-12 college preparatory school, located in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Oakwood Adventist Academy is a Seventh-day Adventist co-educational K-12 school located on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Randolph School is an American independent private kindergarten-through-12th-grade college preparatory school chartered in 1959 in Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. ...

Higher Education

Image:Mortarboard.jpgHuntsville's higher education institutions include: This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

The University of Alabama in Huntsville is the largest university serving the greater Huntsville area. The research-intensive university has more than 7,200 students. Approximately half of the university’s graduates earn a degree in engineering or science, making the university one of the largest producers of engineers and physical scientists in Alabama. Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, also known as Alabama A&M University or AAMU, is an accredited, public, coeducational land grant college established under the terms of the Morrill Act of 1890 located in Normal, Madison County, Alabama. ... The University of Alabama in Huntsville is a state-supported, public, coeducational university, accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, masters and doctoral degrees. ...


Oakwood University, founded in 1896, is a Seventh-day Adventist university and a member institution of the United Negro College Fund. It is one of the nation's leading producers of successful Black applicants to medical schools. Also, the school is home to the USCAA National Basketball Champions (2008) and the winning team of the 19th Annual Honda Campus All-Star Challenge National Championship Tournament (2008).


Numerous colleges and universities have satellite locations or extensions in Huntsville:

One of two local hospitals, Huntsville Hospital[45] also has an accredited school of radiologic technology. [46] The University of Alabama at Birmingham (also known as UAB) is a public, coeducational university located in Birmingham, Alabama, USA. The university is part of the three-member University of Alabama System, which includes the University of Alabamas main campus located in Tuscaloosa (UA) and the University of Alabama... Located in North Alabamas high technology corridor, Calhoun Community College exemplifies the two-year college mission of commitment to excellence in teaching and service. ... Basic Facts This extension of the Calhoun Community College System is located within the 2nd largest Research Park in the country, Cummings Research Park. ... This extension of the Calhoun Community College System is located in the Redston Arsenal in Huntsville, AL. This extension is used to educated citizens that live on the Redstone Arsenal, as well as the Huntsville-Decatur Metro Area. ... Athens State University located in Athens, Alabama is a two year upper level University. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Faulkner University Faulkner University is a private Christian university, located in Montgomery, Alabama, USA, and affiliated with the Church of Christ. ... Photo of Columbia College (then Christian College), 1904 Columbia College (also called Columbia College of Missouri) is a private liberal arts university based in Columbia, Missouri. ... Virginia College is a chain of for-profit post-secondary institutions located primarily in the Southeastern United States. ... Florida Institute of Technology is an independent technical college located in Melbourne, Florida (Brevard County), United States. ... Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is a not-for-profit, non-sectarian, coeducational private university with a history dating back to the early days of aviation. ... The Huntsville Hospital System also known as Huntsville Hospital is a hospital campus consisting of several sites and buildings in the Medical District of Huntsville, Alabama. ... Image A: A normal chest X-ray. ...


Attractions

Historic districts

  • Twickenham Historic District was chosen as the name of the first of three of the city's historic districts. It features homes in the Federal and Greek Revival architectural styles introduced to the city by Virginia-born architect George Steele about 1818, and contains the most dense concentration of antebellum homes in Alabama. The 1819 Weeden House Museum, home of female artist and poet Howard Weeden, is open to the public, as are several others in the district.
  • Old Town Historic District [47] contains a variety of styles (Federal, Greek Revival, Queen Anne, and even California cottages), with homes dating from the late 1820s through the early 1900s.
  • Five Points Historic District [48], the newest historic district, consists predominantly of bungalows built around the turn of the 20th century, by which time Huntsville was becoming a mill town.

Twickenham Historic District was the first historic district in Huntsville, AL. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 4, 1973. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Old Town Historic District was the second historic district in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Five Points Historic District was the third historic district in Huntsville, AL. It features homes built around the turn of the 20th Century in several styles, including California Bungalow, Queen Anne and other modest Victorian styles dating from the late 1890s through the early 1900s. ...

Museums

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center exhibits a Saturn I (left, behind trees) and a much larger (and farther back) Saturn V mock-up along with a number of other rockets illustrating the history of United States space exploration. A simulator in the foreground was built from an adapter cone from the flight model Saturn V (not pictured).
The U.S. Space & Rocket Center exhibits a Saturn I (left, behind trees) and a much larger (and farther back) Saturn V mock-up along with a number of other rockets illustrating the history of United States space exploration. A simulator in the foreground was built from an adapter cone from the flight model Saturn V (not pictured).
  • U.S. Space & Rocket Center [49] is home to the U.S. Space Camp and Aviation Challenge programs as well as the only Saturn V rocket designated a National Historic Landmark.
  • Alabama Constitution Village [50] features eight reconstructed Federal style buildings, with living-museums displays downtown.
  • Burritt Museum and Park [51] located on Monte Sano Mountain, is a regional history museum featuring a 1930s mansion, nature trails, scenic overlooks and more.
  • Clay House Museum [52] is an antebellum home built ca. 1853 and showcases decorative styles up to 1950 and an outstanding collection of Noritake Porcelain.
  • Early Works Museum [53] is a child friendly interactive museum in downtown Huntsville.
  • Harrison Brothers Hardware Store [54] established in 1879, is the oldest operating hardware store in Alabama. Though now owned and operated by the Historic Huntsville Foundation [55], it is still a working store, and part museum featuring skilled craftsmen who volunteer to run the store and answer questions.
  • The Historic Huntsville Depot [56] completed in 1860 is the oldest surviving railroad depot in Alabama and one of the oldest surviving depots in the United States.
  • Huntsville Museum of Art [57] in Big Spring International Park offers permanent displays, traveling exhibitions, and educational programs for children and adults.
  • Sci-Quest [58] is an interactive premiere hands-on museum for early childhood education, aged four through sixth grade.

the rockets at the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Saturn I was Americas first large clustered rocket. ... For the moon designated Saturn V, see Rhea. ... Some of the rockets in the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. ... Towering rockets in Rocket Park are a daily sight for campers at U.S. Space Camp. ... For the moon designated Saturn V, see Rhea. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Alabama Constitution Village is a historical museum in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Monte Sano is a horseshoe-shaped mountain in Madison County, Alabama beside the city of Huntsville. ... Noritake Co. ... “Fine China” redirects here. ... The Huntsville Depot located on the Norfolk Southern Railroad line in downtown Huntsville is the oldest surviving railroad depot in Alabama and one of the oldest in the United States. ... Huntsville Museum of Art is a museum located in Huntsville, Alabama. ...

Parks

  • Land Trust of Huntsville & North Alabama [62] is a member supported, non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of the natural heritage of the area, and has preserved more than 5,000 acres (9 km²) of open space, wildflower areas, wetlands, working farms and scenic vistas in North Alabama, including 1,000+ acres (2.4 km²) of the Monte Sano Preserve (Monte Sano Mountain), 1000+ of the Blevins Gap Preserve (Huntsville & Green Mountains), and 813 acres of the Wade Mountain Preserve. Volunteers have created and maintain 33+ miles of public trails - all of which are within the Huntsville city limits.
  • The Lydia Gold Skatepark, located at 200 Cleveland Avenue, NW (behind the Historic Huntsville Depot, between Church and Meridian Streets, near I-565) is a FREE venue open to the public from sunup until sundown. In 2003, it was dedicated to the late Lydia Leigh Gold (1953-1993), an area skateboarding activist in the 1980’s and the former owner of “Tattooed Lady Comics and Skateboards.”

Monte Sano State Park is a 2,140 acre (8. ... CCC workers on road construction, Camp Euclid, Ohio 1936 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a work relief program for young men from unemployed families, established on March 19, 1933 by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... “RV” redirects here. ... The Huntsville Botanical Garden 112 acres (453,000 m²) is a young botanical garden located at 4747 Bob Wallace Avenue, Huntsville, Alabama, near the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. ...

Festivals

  • Big Spring Jam is an annual three-day music festival held on the last full weekend of September in and around Big Spring International Park in downtown Huntsville. It features a diversity of music including rock, country, Christian, kid-friendly, and oldies.
  • The Panoply Arts Festival, an annual Huntsville tradition since 1981, is presented by The Arts Council and held the last full weekend of each April in downtown’s Big Spring International Park. This three-day festival features presentations, demonstrations, performances, and workshops while promoting and enhancing the arts. Over the years, Panoply has evolved into one of the region’s largest festivals, featuring activities and events like the “Global Village” – a gateway to the area’s diverse cultures – to free hands-on children’s activities to the “Official Alabama State Fiddling Championship.” Panoply had a record attendance of over 140,000 in 2007. The Southeast Tourism Society ranked the festival among their “Top Twenty Events” and Gov. Bob Riley recently announced it as one of Alabama’s Top Ten Tourism Events for 2007.
  • The June Black Arts Festival[13] is the largest two-day ethnic festival in the Huntsville area. From the performing to the visual arts, it provides a glimpse of the wealth of talent among local, regional & national entertainers & artists within the black community. Begun in 1990 by veteran Huntsville broadcaster Hundley Batts, Sr., the first 17 events were held at the grounds surrounding the WEUP studio complex. Because of parking and traffic considerations, the 2007 festival was held at Alabama A&M University.
  • Con†Stellation[14] is an annual general-interest science fiction convention. Con†Stellation (also written as Con*Stellation) is generally held over a Friday-Sunday weekend in mid-October each year but exact dates vary.

Big Spring Jam is an annual three-day music festival taking place in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, also known as Alabama A&M University or AAMU, is an accredited, public, coeducational land grant college established under the terms of the Morrill Act of 1890 located in Normal, Madison County, Alabama. ... Con†Stellation (also written as Con*Stellation) is an annual general-interest science fiction convention held in Huntsville, Alabama. ...

Public golf courses

  • The Becky Pierce Municipal Golf Course, or "Muni", off Airport Road (named for the old airport, not near the current airport) in south Huntsville is the city's only public golf course. Other nearby public courses include:
  • Monrovia Golf Course
  • Sunset Landing Golf Club (located next to the airport)
  • Colonial Golf Course
  • Fox Run Golf Course
  • Harvest Hills Golf Course (Harvest, AL)
  • Chriswood Golf Course (Athens, AL)
  • Southern Gayles (Athens, AL)
  • Canebrake (Athens, AL)

The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail is a collection of nine championship caliber golf courses, designed by Robert Trent Jones, Sr. ...

Private golf courses

  • Established in 1925, the historic Huntsville Country Club boasts a challenging 18-hole course with dining and banquet facilities located just North of downtown at 2601 Oakwood Avenue.
  • The Ledges is Huntsville's newest golf community with 18 holes, dining and banquet facilities overlooking Jones Valley.
  • Valley Hill Country Club features 27 holes in South Huntsville's Jones Valley.

The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...

Libraries

  • The Huntsville Madison County Public Library[15] founded in 1818, is Alabama's oldest continually operating library system with 12 branches throughout the county including one bookmobile. The Main Library Archives contains a wealth of historical resources, including displays of photographic collections and artifacts, has Alabama's highest materials circulation rate, and features daily public programs.

Huntsvilles Library was founded in 1818, when Alabama was still a part of the Mississippi Territory. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The bookmobile of the Ottawa Public Library A bookmobile or mobile library is a large vehicle designed for use as a library. ...

Performing arts

  • Huntsville Symphony Orchestra[16] is Alabama's oldest, continuously-operating professional symphony orchestra, featuring high quality performances of classical, pops and family concerts, and extensive music education programs serving public schools.
  • Fantasy Playhouse is Huntsville's oldest children's theater, with over 46 years of performing for the young and young at heart. An all volunteer organization, Fantasy Playhouse engages the children of North Alabama both on stage and off. Fantasy Academy, the organization's dance, music and art school, teaches hundreds of children and adults each year. Fantasy Playhouse regularly produces three plays a year with an additional play, A Christmas Carol produced in early December.
  • Theatre Huntsville, the result of a merger between Twickenham Repertory Company (1979-1997) and Huntsville Little Theatre (1950-1997), is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, all-volunteer arts organization that presents six plays each season in the Von Braun Center Playhouse, and also produces the annual "Shakespeare on the Mountain" in an outdoor venue, such as Burritt on the Mountain. Presentations range from such popular favorites as "The Foreigner" and "Noises Off" to original plays ("The Trial of Frank James in Huntsville, Alabama") to cutting-edge productions, including "Mrs. Bob Cratchit's Wild Christmas Binge," "The Laramie Project" and "Angels in America," to the occasional musical ("Little Shop of Horrors," "Nunsense") and local works.
  • Plays are also performed at the 85-seat Renaissance Theatre in Lincoln Village north of downtown.
  • Ars Nova School of the Arts is a local conservatory for music and performing arts. Ars Nova also produces musical theatre and opera for the local stage.
  • Huntsville Community Chorus Association is Huntsville's oldest performing arts organization, producing both choral concerts and musical theater productions. In addition, HCCA features its Madrigal Singers; "Glitz!" (a show choir); a Chamber Chorale; an annual summer melodrama; and two children's groups, the Huntsville Community Children’s Chorus (HC3) and HC3Jr, for the younger set.
  • Flying Monkey Arts is located in the historic Lowe Mill, and hosts a variety of events such as the traditional Cigar Box Guitar festival and the edgy Sex Workers' Art Show. The Flying Monkey is home to a variety of artists and shops including Crash Boom Bang Theatre Inc. and 4Motion Skateboard Shop and the Vertical House Record Store.
  • Musicals and plays are also performed at Ovation Arts Center

The Huntsville Symphony Orchestra is the symphonic orchestra of Huntsville, Alabama. ... Ars Nova School of the Arts is a conservatory located in Huntsville, Alabama providing education in fine arts, particularly music and theatre, to students of all ages. ... The Sex Workers Art Show is a touring cabaret and burlesque art show, developed in 1997 in Olympia, Washington by Annie Oakley. ...

Convention centers and arenas

  • The Von Braun Center, which opened in 1975, has an arena capable of seating 10,000, a 2,000-seat concert hall, a 500-seat playhouse, and 150,000 square feet (14,000 m²) of convention space.

The Von Braun Center (VBC), formerly known as the Von Braun Civic Center (VBCC), is a multipurpose indoor arena, meeting, and performing arts complex, with a maximum arena seating capacity of 10,000, located in Huntsville, Alabama. ...

Other

  • The National Speleological Society[17] is headquartered in Huntsville on Cave Street.
  • The Von Braun Astronomical Society[18] has two observatories and a planetarium on 10 acres (40,000 m²) in Monte Sano State Park.

The National Speleological Society (NSS) is an organization formed in 1941 to advance the exploration, conservation, study, and understanding of caves in the United States. ...

Sports

The Huntsville Stars are a minor league baseball team based in Huntsville, Alabama. ... The Southern League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Southern United States. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... The Huntsville Havoc are a professional ice hockey team. ... The Southern Professional Hockey League (SPHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams located in the southeastern United States. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... The Tennessee Valley Vipers is Huntsville, Alabamas af2 franchise, holding home games at the Von Braun Center. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA) was founded in 1921, is a private agency organized by its member schools to control and promote their athletic programs. ... Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, also known as Alabama A&M University or AAMU, is an accredited public, coeducational land grant college located in Normal, Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The University of Alabama in Huntsville is a state-supported, public, coeducational university, accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, masters and doctoral degrees. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... The Gulf South Conference (GSC) is a College Athletic Conference which operates in the southeastern United States. ...

Stadiums

Joe W. Davis Stadium was built in 1985 in Huntsville, Alabama, USA to host the Southern League Huntsville Stars minor league baseball team. ... Goldsmith-Schiffman Field is a multi-purpose stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Milton Frank Stadium is a 12,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Louis Crews Stadium is a 21,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. ...

Past sports franchises

The Alabama Hawks were a professional American football team based in Huntsville, Alabama. ... The Continental Football League was an American football league played in North America from 1965 through 1969. ... The Global Basketball Association was a minor league with various franchises in the United States. ... The Huntsville Blast competed for one season in the ECHL: 1993-1994. ... The ECHL is a professional minor-league double-A hockey association based in the United States and Canada. ... The Eastern Indoor Soccer League was an attempt to create a regional minor indoor soccer league. ... The Huntsville Channel Cats were a minor-league professional ice hockey team based in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Southern Hockey League can refer to two different professional ice hockey leagues. ... This article is about the current CHL. For earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation). ... The South East Hockey League The South East Hockey League was formed in August 2003 It picked up the pieces of the Short lived ACHL and Had 4 teams for its first season. ... The Huntsville Flight are a National Basketball Development League team based in Huntsville, Alabama. ... The NBA Development League, or D-League, is the National Basketball Associations officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ... The Rock River Raptors are a professional indoor football team. ... United Indoor Football is an indoor American football league that was started in 2005. ...

Notable residents and famous natives

Main category: People from Huntsville, Alabama

Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... William Brockman Bankhead (April 12, 1874 - September 15, 1940) was an American politician from Alabama. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fred Rerun Berry (March 13, 1951 - October 21, 2003) was an American actor best known for the role of Fred Rerun Stubbs on the popular 1970s television show Whats Happening!!. He was born in St. ... Harold Elwin Bo Bice, Jr. ... For the current American Idol season, see American Idol (season 7). ... David B. Birney David Bell Birney (May 29, 1825 – October 18, 1864) was a businessman, lawyer, and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... James G. Birney James Gillespie Birney (February 4, 1792–November 25, 1857) was an American presidential candidate for the Liberty Party in the 1840 and 1844 elections. ... James G. Birney James Gillespie Birney (February 4, 1792–November 25, 1857) was an American presidential candidate for the Liberty Party in the 1840 and 1844 elections. ... William Birney (1819-1907) was born near Huntsville, Alabama, and educated at Yale College and in Europe. ... James G. Birney James Gillespie Birney (February 4, 1792–November 25, 1857) was an American presidential candidate for the Liberty Party in the 1840 and 1844 elections. ... Michael (Mike) E. Brown (born c. ... José Canseco y Capas, Jr. ... Stewart Cink (b May 21, 1973 Huntsville, Alabama) is an American golfer who has featured in the top ten of the Official World Golf Rankings at times. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... The 5th Congressional District of Alabama is located in the north of the state, along the Tennessee border. ... Thomas Turpin Crittenden (October 16, 1825 – September 5, 1905) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... This article or section needs to be wikified. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Kenneth Darby is a American football Running back for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. ... Clifton Davis (born October 4, 1945) is an American actor who has appeared on television shows such as Thats My Mama (on which he had the lead role) in the 1970s and on Amen in the 1980s. ... Jan Davis N. Jan Davis (b. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... This article is about the space vehicle. ... Michael Mike J. Durant (born July 23, 1961) is the American pilot who was held prisoner after a raid in Mogadishu, Somalia on October 3, 1993. ... Bobby Eaton Bobby Eaton (born Robert Lee Eaton), is a professional wrestler, famous for his days as one half of the Midnight Express. ... Albert Russel Erskine (January 24, 1871 – July 1, 1933) was an American businessman. ... Andrew Jackson Hamilton (January 28, 1815–April 11, 1875) was a U.S. politician during the third quarter of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Cully Hamner (born March 7, 1969 in Huntsville, Alabama) is an American comic book artist. ... Heartland is a most often a geopolitical term, often used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... John S. Hendricks (March 29, 1952)[1] is the founder and chairman of Discovery Communications, a broadcasting and film production company which owns the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet cable networks, among other ventures. ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... Homer Hadley Hickam, Jr. ... Hallerin Hilton Hill (born 1964) is a radio talk show host on Newstalk 100 WNOX Knoxville, Tennessee, and television talk show host of Anything is Possible on WBIR-TV in Knoxville. ... Bill Holbrook is a prolific American comic strip writer and artist. ... Buck Johnson (born January 3, 1964 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American former professional basketball player who was selected by the Houston Rockets in the 1st round (20th overall) of the 1986 NBA Draft. ... For the Formula One technical director, see James Key (Formula One). ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game is an annual exhibition baseball game between the best players from the National League and the American League. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) Formerly named SkyDome (1989-2005) Exhibition Stadium (1977-1989) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1992 â€¢ 1993 AL... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Clarke Lewis (November 8, 1840 - March 13, 1896) was a United States Representative from Mississippi. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Joseph Lowery, (born October 6, 1921, in Huntsville, Alabama) is a leader in the American civil rights movement. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately twenty years (1960-1980) in which there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... William R. Lucas (born March 1, 1922) was the fourth Director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. ... Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963 in Pomona, California) is a former professional baseball player who played the majority of his major league career with the Oakland Athletics before finishing his career with the St. ... Brian McKnight (born June 5, 1969 in Buffalo, New York)[1] is a Grammy-nominated American singer, songwriter, arranger, producer, pop and R&B musician. ... Jimmy Smut Means is a former Winston Cup/Nextel Cup owner/driver. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Donald Ray Mincher (born June 24, 1938 Huntsville, Alabama - ) was a first baseman/outfielder with a 13 year career from 1960 to 1972. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Southern League may mean: Southern League (baseball) for minor league baseball in the United States Southern League (football) for the semi-professional and amateur football league in England often known as the Dr. Martens League Southern League (ice hockey), a former top-flight ice hockey league in southern England. ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Amobi Okoye (born June 10, 1987 in Anambra State, Nigeria) is an American football player for the Houston Texans. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Edward Asbury ONeal (September 20, 1818–November 20, 1890) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Logo of the 2nd Games in Seattle The Goodwill Games were an international sports competition, created by Ted Turner in reaction to the political troubles surrounding the Olympic Games of the 1980s. ... Brian Reynolds (born 1967) is a well known computer strategy game designer, formerly of MicroProse and Firaxis Games. ... In this screenshot of Civilization II most of the gameworld has been discovered, as can be seen by the mini-map located in the upper right of the screen. ... Ramzee Robinson (born February 20, 1984) is an American football cornerback who was drafted with the 255th and final pick of the 2007 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions, earning the title of the 32nd Mr. ... This article is about the slave. ... Bryan Shelton (born December 22, 1965 in Huntsville, Alabama) is a former tennis player from the United States, who turned professional in 1989. ... Mark Spencer at the 2006 OReilly Emerging Telephony Conference. ... Gaim is a popular multi-platform instant messaging client that supports many commonly used instant messaging protocols. ... This article is about the typographical symbol. ... Johnny Lee Stallworth (Born July 15, 1952, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) played college football at Alabama A&M, becoming the Pittsburgh Steelers fourth-round draft pick in 1974. ... Steelers redirects here. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Charles Evard Gabby Street (September 30, 1882 – February 6, 1951), also nicknamed The Old Sarge, was an American catcher, manager, coach and radio play-by-play broadcaster in Major League Baseball during the first half of the 20th century. ... Take 6 is an influential American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Harry Townes (September 18, 1914 – May 23, 2001)[1] was an television and movie actor. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Jimmy Donal Jimbo Wales, (born August 7, 1966)[2] is an American Internet entrepreneur best known for his role in founding Wikipedia, as well as other wiki-related projects, including the charitable organization Wikimedia Foundation, and the for-profit company Wikia, Inc. ... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ... LeRoy Pope Walker (February 7, 1817 – August 23, 1884) was the first Confederate States Secretary of War and issued the orders for the firing on Fort Sumter, which began the American Civil War. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Mervyn Warren (born February 29, 1964 in Huntsville, Alabama) is an American film composer, record producer, lyricist, songwriter, music arranger, pianist and vocalist. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia...

Hospitals

The Huntsville Hospital System also known as Huntsville Hospital is a hospital campus consisting of several sites and buildings in the Medical District of Huntsville, Alabama. ...

Suburbs

Athens is a city in Limestone County, Alabama. ... Gurley is a town located in Madison County, Alabama. ... Harvest is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in the northwestern part of Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Hazel Green is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Madison County, Alabama. ... Laceys Spring is located in northeastern Morgan County, Alabama at the base of Brindley Mountain, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Metro Area. ... Madison is a city located primarily in Madison County, Alabama with a small portion in Limestone County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Meridianville is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Madison County, Alabama. ... Monrovia is an unincorporated community in Madison County, Alabama, United States. ... Moores Mill is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Madison County, Alabama. ... New Hope is a small city located in Madison County, Alabama. ... New Market is a census-designated place (CDP) in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Owens Cross Roads is a town located in Madison County, Alabama. ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Toney is an unincorporated community in northwestern Madison County, Alabama. ... Triana is a town located in Madison County, Alabama. ...

References

  1. USA Today article on Huntsville tornadoes
  2. NWS report
  1. ^ a b c Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Alabama, Listed Alphabetically: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (CSV). 2007 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (June 28, 2007). Retrieved on June 28, 2007.
  2. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ Helion Lodge #1, Huntsville, Alabama
  4. ^ a b NASA MSFC Notes on the History of Huntsville
  5. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ http://www.al.com/news/huntsvilletimes/index.ssf?/base/news/120825092188200.xml&coll=1
  7. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  8. ^ Arbitron Rating of radio markets
  9. ^ Filming Locations for Like Moles, Like Rats (2007). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  10. ^ Filming Locations for Air Band or How I Hated Being Bobby Manelli's Blonde Headed Friend (2005). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  11. ^ Filming Locations for Constellation (2005). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  12. ^ Huntsville City Schools
  13. ^ 103. FM, WEUP radio
  14. ^ Con*Stellation, a Science Fiction convention.
  15. ^ Huntsville Madison County Public Library
  16. ^ Huntsville Symphony Orchestra
  17. ^ National Speleological Society (NSS)
  18. ^ Von Braun Astronomical Society
  19. ^ a b [1969] (1979) in Reichler, Joseph L.: The Baseball Encyclopedia, 4th edition, New York: Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-578970-8. 
  20. ^ 1986 Swimming - Men's Competition. Goodwill Games.

The comma-separated values (or CSV; also known as a comma-separated list or comma-separated variables) file format is a file type that stores tabular data. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Huntsville, Alabama
  • City of Huntsville
  • Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Chamber of Commerce
  • Huntsville, Alabama is at coordinates 34°42′44″N 86°35′47″W / 34.712341, -86.596296 (Huntsville, Alabama)Coordinates: 34°42′44″N 86°35′47″W / 34.712341, -86.596296 (Huntsville, Alabama)

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Huntsville Alabama Real Estate (366 words)
Huntsville Alabama real estate investment property is in high demand.
Huntsville is one of the fastest growing cities in the state.
Huntsville is located in Madison County bordering Tennessee in the center of North Alabama.
Huntsville Alabama homepage (264 words)
The high-tech city of Huntsville which sprawls at the foot of a mountain in North Alabama is equally at home in the 19th century or the 21st.
Huntsville's tourist attractions reflect the heritage of Alabama's first English-speaking city, the strife of the American Civil War, and the accomplishments of America's rocket scientists.
Huntsville's visitor attractions offer a wealth of activities for the native and international visitor alike.
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