FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hunter S. Thompson
Hunter S. Thompson

Thompson circa 1970, with his trademark cigarette with holder and sunglasses.
Born Hunter Stockton Thompson
July 18, 1937(1937-07-18)
Louisville, Kentucky, United States
Died February 20, 2005 (aged 67)
Woody Creek, Colorado, United States
Occupation Journalist, author
Genres Gonzo journalism
Literary movement New Journalism
Notable work(s) Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Woody Creek is an unincorporated community in Pitkin County, Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ...


Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail 72 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ...

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author, most famous for his novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. He is credited as the creator of Gonzo journalism, a style of reporting where reporters involve themselves in the action to such a degree that they become central figures of their stories. He is also known for his promotion and use of psychedelics and other mind-altering substances (and to a lesser extent, alcohol and firearms), his anarchist views and his iconoclastic contempt for authority. William S. Burroughs. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... J.P. Donleavy James Patrick Donleavy is an Irish American author, born April 23, 1926 in New York to Irish immigrants. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... H. L. (Henry Louis) Mencken (September 12, 1880, Baltimore – January 29, 1956, Baltimore), was a journalist, essayist, magazine editor, satirist, acerbic critic of American life and culture, and a student of the American English. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a counter-cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... A photograph of Mark Ames from an eXile article Mark Ames (1965-) is a Moscow-based American journalist and editor. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... P.J. ORourke speaks at a January 2007 event at the Cato Institute about his latest book. ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ... Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... // Journalism is the discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... This article is about journalistic reporters. ... A fractal pattern similar to the spiral patterns that may be seen as the result of some psychedelic drug experiences. ... Booze redirects here. ... Firearms redirects here. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Statues in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht, attacked in Reformation iconoclasm in the 16th century. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Thompson grew up in the Cherokee Triangle neighborhood of the Highlands. He was the first son of Jack Robert (1893 – 3 July 1952), an insurance adjuster and a U.S. Army veteran who served in France during World War I, and Virginia Davidson Ray (1908 – 1998), a reference librarian and secretary who, while a student at the University of Michigan, had joined the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. Introduced by a mutual friend from Jack's fraternity in 1934, they married in 1935.[1] Louisville redirects here. ... The Castleman Statue, a neighborhood landmark Cherokee Triangle is a historic neighborhood in Louisville, Kentucky, USA, known for its large homes displaying an eclectic mix of architectural styles. ... The Highlands is an area of Louisville, Kentucky which contains a high density of night clubs, ecclectic businesses, and many upscale and fast food restaurants. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Public Insurance Adjusters are (usually American) businesses that help policy holders receive payment from insurance companies. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Librarian, a 1556 painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo A librarian is an information professional trained in library and information science, which is the organization and management of information services or materials for those with information needs. ... For other uses, see Secretary (disambiguation). ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Alpha Gamma Delta (ΑΓΔ) Founded in 1904, Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women dedicated to academic excellence, leadership development, high ideals and sisterhood. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Jack died of myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disease, on 3 July 1952, when Hunter was 14 years old, leaving three sons — Hunter, Davison, and James (1949–1993) — to be brought up by their mother. Contemporaries indicated that after Jack's death, Virginia became a "heavy drinker."[1] Myasthenia gravis (sometimes abbreviated MG; from the Greek myastheneia, lit. ... Neuromuscular disease is a very broad term that encompasses many diseases and ailments that either directly, via intrinsic muscle pathology, or indirectly, via nerve pathology, impair the functioning of the muscles. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ...


Interested in sports and athletically inclined from a young age, Thompson joined Louisville’s Castlewood Athletic Club, a sports club for teenagers that prepared them for high-school sports, where he excelled in baseball, though he never joined any sports teams in high school. He was constantly in trouble at school.[1] A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... A sports club, athletics club or sports association is an eclectic institution oriented to multiple sports, which fields many teams and in several sports, working under the same umbrella organization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Education

Thompson attended the I.N. Bloom Elementary School, and then Atherton High School, transferring to Louisville Male High School in 1952 following the death of his father. That same year he was accepted as a member of the Athenaeum Literary Association, a school-sponsored literary and social club that had been founded at Male High in 1862. Its members at the time, generally drawn from Louisville’s wealthy upper-class families, included Porter Bibb, who became the first publisher of Rolling Stone. As an Athenaeum member, Thompson contributed articles and helped edit the club’s yearbook The Spectator; however, the group ejected Thompson from its membership in 1955, citing his legal problems.[1] Atherton High School is a public school in the Highlands district of Louisville, Kentucky. ... Established in 1856, Louisville Male High School in Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest public high school west of the Alleghenies. ... Athenaeum, also Athenæum or Atheneum, is used in the names of institutions or periodicals for literary, scientific, or artistic study. ... A literary society is a group of people interested in literature. ... The American upper class described the sociological ideology concerning the status of the top layer of society in the United States. ... This article is about the magazine. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ...


Charged as an accessory to robbery after having been in a car with the person who committed the robbery, Thompson was sentenced to serve 60 days in Kentucky’s Jefferson County Jail. He served 30 days of his sentence, and joined the U.S. Air Force a week after his release.[1] An accessory is a person who assists in or conceals a crime, but does not actually participate in the commission of the crime. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... USAF redirects here. ...


Military career

Thompson did his basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, and later transferred to Scott Air Force Base in Illinois to study electronics. He applied to become a pilot but was rejected by the Air Force's aviation-cadet program. In 1956, he transferred to Eglin Air Force Base, near Pensacola, Florida. There he worked in the information-services department and became the sports editor of the base's newspaper, The Command Courier. In this capacity, he covered the Eglin Eagles, a base football team that included such future professional stars as Max McGee and Zeke Bratkowski. Thompson traveled with the team around the U.S., covering its games. In 1957, he also wrote a sports column anonymously for The Playground News, a local newspaper in Fort Walton Beach, Florida.[1] U.S. Army recruits learn about bayonet fighting skills in an infantry Basic Combat Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Lackland Air Force Base is a base of the United States Air Force located in the western area of San Antonio, Texas, USA. Lackland AFB is the only entry processing station for Air Force Basic Military Training (BMT). ... San Antonio redirects here. ... Scott Air Force Base (Scott AFB) (IATA: BLV, ICAO: KBLV) is an base of the United States Air Force in St. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Surface mount electronic components Electronics is the study of the flow of charge through various materials and devices such as semiconductors, resistors, inductors, capacitors, nano-structures and vacuum tubes. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Aerial warfare be merged into this article or section. ... A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... Eglin Air Force Base is the home of the United States Air Force 96th Air Base Wing of the Air Force Materiel Command, and is also headquarters for more than 45 associate units. ... Nickname: Motto: Enhancing the Quality of Life for all Citizens Location in Escambia County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg (R) Area  - City 39. ... Sports journalism is a form of journalism that reports on sports topics and events. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... William Max McGee (July 16, 1932 â€“ October 20, 2007) was a professional football wide receiver who played for the Green Bay Packers from 1954-67. ... Zeke Bratkowski was a quarterback in the NFL. Category: ... Fort Walton Beach is a city in Okaloosa County, Florida, United States. ...


Thompson left the Air Force in 1958 as an Airman First Class, having been recommended for an early honorable discharge by his commanding officer. "In summary, this airman, although talented, will not be guided by policy," Col. William S. Evans, chief of information services wrote to the Eglin personnel office. "Sometimes his rebel and superior attitude seems to rub off on other airmen staff members." Thompson claimed in a mock press release he wrote about the end of his duty to have been issued a "totally unclassifiable" status.[2] Airman First Class (A1C) is the third enlisted rank in the United States Air Force, just above Airman and below Senior Airman. ... A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from his or her obligation to serve. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ...


Early journalism career

After the Air Force, he worked as sports editor for a newspaper in Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania[3] before moving to New York City. There he attended Columbia University's School of General Studies part-time on the G.I. Bill, taking classes in short-story writing.[4] Jersey Shore is a borough located in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The School of General Studies, commonly known as General Studies or simply GS, is Columbia Universitys undergraduate college for non-traditional students. ... The Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 (better known as the G.I. Bill) provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G.I.s) as well as one year of unemployment compensation. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


During this time he worked briefly for Time, as a copy boy for $51 a week. While working, he used a typewriter to copy F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms in order to learn about the writing styles of the authors. In 1959, Time fired him for insubordination.[4] Later that year, he worked as a reporter for The Middletown Daily Record in Middletown, New York. He was fired from this job after damaging an office candy machine and arguing with the owner of a local restaurant who happened to be an advertiser with the paper.[4] TIME redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This article is about the novel. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... For the Machine Head song, see A Farewell to Arms (song). ... Insubordination is the act of a subordinate deliberately disobeying a lawful order. ... The Times Herald Record, often referred to as just The Record in its coverage area, is a daily newspaper published in Middletown, New York. ... Erie Railroad, Middletown Station, James Street, July, 1971. ... This article is about the state. ... A typical U.S. snack vending machine A vending machine is a machine that provides various snacks, beverages and other products to consumers. ...

The Rum Diary cover contains a photograph of a young Thompson at the beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
The Rum Diary cover contains a photograph of a young Thompson at the beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

In 1960 Thompson moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico, to take a job with the sporting magazine El Sportivo, which soon folded. Thompson had first unsuccessfully applied for a job with the Puerto Rico English-language daily The San Juan Star and its managing editor, future novelist William Kennedy[5]. After the demise of El Sportivo, Thompson worked as a stringer for the New York Herald Tribune and a few stateside papers on Caribbean issues with Kennedy working as his editor.[6] After returning to the States, Hunter lived in California, working as a security guard and caretaker at the Big Sur Hot Springs for an eight-month period in 1961, just before it became the Esalen Institute. While there, he was able to publish his first magazine feature in the nationally-distributed Rogue magazine on the artisan and bohemian culture of Big Sur. The article got him fired from his job as a caretaker. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (451x700, 56 KB) Summary bn. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (451x700, 56 KB) Summary bn. ... The Rum Diary, an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson, was written in 1959 but was not published until 1998. ... For other uses, see San Juan. ... For other uses, see San Juan. ... The San Juan Star is an English-language, Pulitzer Prize winning newspaper based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... William Joseph Kennedy (born January 16, 1928) is an American writer and journalist born and raised in Albany, New York, whose novels, many of which feature the interaction of members of the fictional Irish-American Phelan family, make use of incidents of Albanys history and the supernatural. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... A security officer guards a construction site in the Peoples Republic of China. ... A Property caretaker is a person who cares for real estate in exchange for rent-free living accommodations, and with the possibility of additional compensation. ... For other uses, see Big Sur (disambiguation). ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57 F or... Esalen Institute is a center for humanistic alternative education, a nonprofit organization devoted to multidisciplinary studies ordinarily neglected by traditional academia. ... This article is about a magazine, for other uses of the term see Rogue. ... An artisan, also called a craftsman,[1] is a skilled manual worker who uses tools and machinery in a particular craft. ... In modern usage, the term Bohemian (sometimes shortened to boho) is applied to people who live unconventional, usually artistic, lives. ...


During this period, Thompson wrote two novels, Prince Jellyfish and The Rum Diary, and submitted many short stories to publishers with little success. The Rum Diary, which fictionalized Thompson's experiences in Puerto Rico, was eventually published in 1998, long after Thompson had become famous. Prince Jellyfish is an unpublished novel by Hunter S. Thompson. ... The Rum Diary, an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson, was written in 1959 but was not published until 1998. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


From May 1962 to May 1963, Thompson traveled to South America as a correspondent for a Dow Jones-owned weekly newspaper, the National Observer. In Brazil, he spent several months working also as a reporter on the Brazil Herald, the country's only English-language daily, published in Rio de Janeiro. His longtime girlfriend Sandra Dawn Conklin (aka Sandy Conklin Thompson, now Sondi Wright) later joined him in Rio. Dow Jones redirects here. ... The National Observer was a weekly national newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company from 1962 until 1977. ... A newspaper is a written publication containing news, information and advertising, usually printed on low-cost paper called newsprint. ...


Thompson and Conklin were married on 19 May 1963, shortly after they returned to the United States. They briefly relocated to Aspen, Colorado, and had one son, Juan Fitzgerald Thompson, born 23 March 1964. The couple conceived five more times together. Three of the pregnancies were miscarried, and the other two pregnancies produced infants who died shortly after birth. Hunter and Sandy divorced in 1980 but remained close friends until Thompson's death. is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... The City of Aspen is a Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous city and the county seat of Pitkin County, Colorado, United States. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or spontaneous end of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ...


In 1964 the Thompson family then moved to Glen Ellen, California, where Thompson continued to write for the National Observer on an array of domestic subjects, including a story about his 1964 visit to Ketchum, Idaho, in order to investigate the reasons for Ernest Hemingway's suicide.[7] While working on the story, Thompson symbolically stole a pair of elk antlers hanging above the front door of Hemingway's cabin. Thompson and the editors at the Observer eventually had a falling out after the paper refused to print Thompson's review of Tom Wolfe's 1965 essay collection The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby,[8] and he moved to San Francisco, immersing himself in the drug and hippie culture that was taking root in the area. About this time he began writing for the Berkeley underground paper The Spider.[9] Central Glen Ellen along Arnold Drive Glen Ellen is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sonoma Valley, Sonoma County, California, USA. The population was 992 at the 2000 census. ... The National Observer was a weekly national newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company from 1962 until 1977. ... Ketchum is a city located in Blaine County, Idaho, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,003. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby (ISBN 0-553-38058-3) is the title of Tom Wolfes first collected book of essays, published in 1965. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... The history of San Francisco, California, has been greatly influenced by its coastal location, which has made it a natural center for maritime trade and military activity. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in Northern California, in the United States. ... The phrase underground press, especially underground newspapers (or simply underground papers) is, these days, most often used in reference to the alternative print media, independently published and distributed, associated with the countercultural movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...


Hells Angels

See also: Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs

In 1965, Carey McWilliams, editor of The Nation, offered Thompson the opportunity to write a story based on his experience with the California-based Hells Angels motorcycle gang. After The Nation published the article (17 May 1965), Thompson received several book offers and spent the next year living and riding with the Hell's Angels. The relationship broke down when the bikers suspected that Thompson would make money from his writing. The gang demanded a share of the profits and Thompson ended up with a savage beating, or 'stomping' as the Angels referred to it. Random House published the hard cover Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs in 1966. A reviewer for The New York Times praised it as an "angry, knowledgeable, fascinating and excitedly written book," that shows the Hells Angels "not so much as dropouts from society but as total misfits, or unfits — emotionally, intellectually and educationally unfit to achieve the rewards, such as they are, that the contemporary social order offers." The reviewer also praised Thompson as a "spirited, witty, observant and original writer; his prose crackles like motorcycle exhaust."[10] Carey McWilliams (13 December 1905–27 June 1980) was an American author, editor, and lawyer best known for a strong commitment to progressive causes. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... This article is about the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club. ... A motorcycle club (MC) is an organized club of dedicated motorcyclists who join together for camaraderie, strength of numbers, companionship during a mid-life crisis and peer group acceptance. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A stomp (also referred to as a stamp) is a martial arts and combatives term for a downwards strike with the heel of the foot. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Social order is a concept used in sociology, history and other social sciences. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ...


Following the success of Hells Angels, Thompson was able to publish articles in a number of well-known magazines during the late 1960s, including The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Pageant, and others. In the Times Magazine article, published in 1967 shortly before the "Summer of Love" and entitled The Hashbury is the Capital of the Hippies, Thompson wrote in-depth about the hippies of San Francisco, deriding a culture that began to lack the political convictions of the New Left and the artistic core of the Beats, instead becoming overrun with newcomers lacking any purpose other than obtaining drugs.[11] It was an observation on the 60s' counterculture that Thompson would further examine in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and other articles. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... Donna Reed on the October 1946 issue Pageant was a 20th-century monthly magazine, first published in the United States by Hillman Periodicals in November 1944. ... The Summer of Love refers to the summer of 1967, when an unprecedented gathering of as many as 100,000 young people converged on the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, creating a phenomenon of cultural and political rebellion. ... Corner of Haight and Ashbury The Haight-Ashbury is a district of San Francisco, California, USA named for the intersection of Haight and Ashbury Streets, commonly known as The Haight. ... The symbol of the Wandervogel (migratory bird) youth movement A 1967 article in Time Magazine asserts that the foundation of the hippie movement finds historical precedent as far back as the counterculture of the Ancient Greeks, espoused by philosophers like Diogenes of Sinope and the Cynics. ... The New Left were the left-wing movements in different countries in the 1960s and 1970s that, unlike the earlier leftist focus on union activism, instead adopted a broader definition of political activism commonly called social activism. ... Beats redirects here. ... A fractal pattern similar to the spiral patterns that may be seen as the result of some psychedelic drug experiences. ... // The counterculture of the 1960s was a social revolution between the period of 1960 and 1973[1] that began in the United States as a reaction against the conservative social norms of the 1950s, the political conservatism (and perceived social repression) of the Cold War period, and the US government... For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ...


According to Thompson's letters and his later writings, at this time he planned to write a book called The Joint Chiefs about "the death of the American dream." He used a $6,000 advance from Random House to travel on the 1968 Presidential campaign trail and attend the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago for research purposes. From his hotel room in Chicago, Thompson watched the clashes between police and protesters, which he wrote had a great effect on his political views. The planned book was never finished, but the theme of the death of the American dream would be carried over into his later work, and the contract with Random House was eventually fulfilled with the 1972 book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.[12]. Thompson also signed a deal with Ballantine Books in 1968 to write a satirical book called The Johnson File about Lyndon B. Johnson. A few weeks after the contract was signed, however, Johnson announced that he would not stand for re-election, and the deal was cancelled.[13]. Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... (Redirected from 1968 Democratic Convention) Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The hard cover version of the book. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


By late 1967, Thompson and his family moved back to Colorado and rented a house in Woody Creek, a small mountain hamlet outside Aspen. In early 1969, Thompson finally received a $15,000 royalty check for the paperback sales of Hells Angels and used 2/3rds of the money for a down payment on a modest home and property in Woody Creek where Thompson would live for the rest of his life. [14] He named the house Owl Farm and often described this house as his "fortified compound". Woody Creek is an unincorporated community in Pitkin County, Colorado. ...

A modification of one of Thompson's original Gonzo flyers during his bid for sheriff of Aspen, Colorado.
A modification of one of Thompson's original Gonzo flyers during his bid for sheriff of Aspen, Colorado.

Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The City of Aspen is a Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous city and the county seat of Pitkin County, Colorado, United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...

Middle years

See also: The Battle of Aspen

In 1970 Thompson ran for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado, on the "Freak Power" ticket, promoting the decriminalization of drugs (for personal use only, not trafficking, as he disapproved of profiteering), tearing up the streets and turning them into grassy pedestrian malls, banning any building so tall as to obscure the view of the mountains, and renaming Aspen "Fat City" to deter investors. Thompson, having shaved his head, referred to his opponent as "my long-haired opponent", as the Republican candidate had a crew cut. The article title as it first appeared in Rolling Stone magazine. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pitkin County is a county in the U.S. state of Colorado. ... The power of the mind, soul and spirit; primarily practiced by the native Indians of Montopichu, Brazil. ... Drug liberalization is the process of eliminating or reducing drug prohibition laws. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ... GOP redirects here. ... A U.S. Marine sporting a high and tight, crew cut hairstyle A crew cut is a type of haircut in which the hair is cut fairly short. ...


With polls showing him with a slight lead in a three-way race, Thompson appeared at Rolling Stone magazine headquarters in San Francisco with a six-pack of beer in hand and declared to editor Jann Wenner that he was about to be elected the next sheriff of Aspen, Colorado, and wished to write about it.[15] Thus, Thompson's first article in Rolling Stone was published as The Battle of Aspen with the byline "By: Dr. Hunter S. Thompson (Candidate for Sheriff)." Despite the publicity, Thompson ended up narrowly losing the election. While actually carrying the city of Aspen, he only garnered 44% of the county-wide vote in what became a two-way race as the Republican candidate for sheriff agreed to withdraw from the contest a few days before the election in order to consolidate the anti-Thompson votes, in return for the Democrats withdrawing their candidate for county commissioner. Thompson later remarked that the Rolling Stone article mobilized his opposition far more than his supporters.[16] This article is about the magazine. ... Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ... The article title as it first appeared in Rolling Stone magazine. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Birth of Gonzo

Main article: Gonzo journalism

Also in 1970, Thompson wrote an article entitled The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved for the short-lived new journalism magazine Scanlan's Monthly. Although it was not widely read at the time, the article is the first of Thompson's to use techniques of Gonzo journalism, a style he would later employ in almost every literary endeavor. The manic first-person subjectivity of the story was reportedly the result of sheer desperation; he was facing a looming deadline and started sending the magazine pages ripped out of his notebook. Ralph Steadman, who would later collaborate with Thompson on several projects, contributed expressionist pen-and-ink illustrations. Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved is an article by Hunter S. Thompson that first appeared in a June 1970 issue of Scanlans Monthly magazine. ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... Scanlans Monthly was a short-lived monthly publication, running from March 1970 to January 1971. ... Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... First-person narrative is a literary technique in which the story is narrated by one character, who explicitly refers to him or herself in the first person, that is, I. the narrator is a fool putting his nose into the storytelling exercise. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ...


The first use of the word Gonzo to describe Thompson's work is credited to the journalist Bill Cardoso. Cardoso had first met Thompson on a bus full of journalists covering the 1968 New Hampshire primary. In 1970, Cardoso (who, by this time had become the editor of The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine) wrote to Thompson praising the "Kentucky Derby" piece in Scanlan's Monthly as a breakthrough: "This is it, this is pure Gonzo. If this is a start, keep rolling." Thompson took to the word right away, and according to illustrator Ralph Steadman said, "Okay, that's what I do. Gonzo."[17] William J. (Bill) Cardoso (died February 26, 2006) was an American journalist, best known as the coiner of the word gonzo. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first in a series of nationwide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of choosing the Democratic and Republican nominees for the presidential elections to be held the subsequent November. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ...


Thompson's first published use of the word Gonzo appears in a passage in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream: "Free Enterprise. The American Dream. Horatio Alger had gone mad on drugs in Las Vegas. Do it now: pure Gonzo journalism." For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... Horatio Alger, Jr. ...


Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

Thompson in Raoul Duke mode (left), with Acosta, 1971
Thompson in Raoul Duke mode (left), with Acosta, 1971

The book for which Thompson gained most of his fame had its genesis during the research for Strange Rumblings in Aztlan, an exposé for Rolling Stone on the 1970 killing of the Mexican-American television journalist Ruben Salazar. Salazar had been shot in the head at close range with a tear gas canister fired by officers of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department during the National Chicano Moratorium March against the Vietnam War. One of Thompson's sources for the story was Oscar Zeta Acosta, a prominent Mexican-American activist and attorney. Finding it difficult to talk in the racially tense atmosphere of Los Angeles, Thompson and Acosta decided to travel to Las Vegas, Nevada, and take advantage of an assignment by Sports Illustrated to write a 250-word photograph caption on the Mint 400 motorcycle race held there. For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ... Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Strange Rumblings in Aztlan is an article published in Rolling Stone #81, dated April 29, 1971 and written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Expose may mean: exposure, such as to weather or radiation, or in photography an exposé, in investigative journalism Exposé, in Mac OS X the dance music band Exposé Exposés debut album Exposé This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ... Ruben Salazar Ruben Salazar (March 3, 1928 - August 29, 1970) was a Mexican-American news reporter killed by the police during the National Chicano Moratorium March against the Vietnam War on August 29, 1970 in Los Angeles, California. ... This article is about the Los Angeles County Sherriffs Department, not to be confused with the smaller Los Angeles County Police Memorial to fallen deputies. ... The Chicano Moratorium, formally known as the National Chicano Moratorium Committee, was a movement of Chicano anti-war activists that built a broad-based but fragile coalition of Mexican-American groups to organize opposition to the Vietnam War. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Mint 400 was also an album by Australian trio Ammonia. ...


What was to be a short caption quickly grew into something else entirely. Thompson first submitted to Sports Illustrated a manuscript of 2,500 words, which was, as he later wrote, "aggressively rejected." Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner was said to have liked "the first 20 or so jangled pages enough to take it seriously on its own terms and tentatively scheduled it for publication — which gave me the push I needed to keep working on it," Thompson later wrote.[18]


The result of the trip to Las Vegas became the 1972 book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas which first appeared in the November 1971 issues of Rolling Stone as a two-part series. It is written as a first-person account by a journalist named Raoul Duke on a trip to Las Vegas with Dr. Gonzo, his "300-pound Samoan attorney," to cover a narcotics officers' convention and the "fabulous Mint 400". During the trip, Duke and his companion (always referred to as "my attorney") become sidetracked by a search for the American Dream, with "...two bags of grass, seventy-five pellets of mescaline, five sheets of high-powered blotter acid, a salt shaker half full of cocaine, and a whole galaxy of multi-colored uppers, downers, screamers, laughers [...] and also a quart of tequila, a quart of rum, a case of Budweiser, a pint of raw ether, and two dozen amyls." Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... Dr. Gonzo is a name invented by Hunter S. Thompson, as a nickname for himself (although in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, it became the pseudonym for Oscar Zeta Acosta); hence, the phrase gonzo journalism. ... For a more general overview of methods to tackle drug addiction, see Drug policy. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... Not to be confused with mesclun. ... LSD redirects here. ... Amphetamine is a prescription CNS stimulant commonly used to treat attention-deficit disorder (ADD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... Alprazolam 2 mg tablets The benzodiazepines (pronounced , often abbreviated to benzos) are a class of sedative hypnotic psychoactive drugs with varying hypnotic, sedative, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and amnesic properties, which are mediated by slowing down the central nervous system. ... This article is about the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine. ... For other uses, see Nitrous oxide (disambiguation). ... For the other beer named Budweiser, see Budějovický Budvar. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... Amyl nitrite is the chemical compound with the formula C5H11ONO. A variety of isomers are known, but they all feature an amyl group attached to the nitrito functional group. ...


Coming to terms with the failure of the 1960s countercultural movement is a major theme of the novel, and the book was greeted with considerable critical acclaim, including being heralded by the New York Times as "by far the best book yet written on the decade of dope".[19] "The Vegas Book", as Thompson referred to it, was a mainstream success and introduced his Gonzo journalism techniques to the masses. For the Roy Harper album Counter Culture, see Counter Culture. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, 1972

Within the next year, Thompson wrote extensively for Rolling Stone while covering the election campaigns of President Richard Nixon and his unsuccessful opponent, Senator George McGovern. The articles were soon combined and published as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72. As the title suggests, Thompson spent nearly all of his time traveling the "campaign trail," focusing largely on the Democratic Party's primaries (Nixon, as an incumbent, performed little campaign work) in which McGovern competed with rival candidates Ed Muskie and Hubert Humphrey. Thompson was an early supporter of McGovern, and it could be argued that his unflattering coverage of the rival campaigns in the increasingly widely read Rolling Stone played a role in the senator's nomination. Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail 72 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Nixon redirects here. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail 72 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Open seat redirects here. ... Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Thompson went on to become a fierce critic of Nixon, both during and after his presidency. After Nixon's death in 1994, Thompson famously described him in Rolling Stone as a man who "could shake your hand and stab you in the back at the same time" and said "his casket [should] have been launched into one of those open-sewage canals that empty into the ocean just south of Los Angeles. He was a swine of a man and a jabbering dupe of a president. [He] was an evil man—evil in a way that only those who believe in the physical reality of the Devil can understand it."[20] The one passion they shared was a love of football, which is discussed in Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72. This is an overview of the Devil. ... Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail 72 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ...


Thompson was to provide Rolling Stone similar coverage for the 1976 Presidential Campaign that would appear in a book published by the magazine. Reportedly, as Thompson was waiting for a $75,000 advance cheque to arrive, he learned that Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner had pulled the plug on the endeavor without telling Thompson.[21] The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ...


Wenner then asked Thompson to travel to Vietnam to report on what appeared to be the closing of the Vietnam War. Thompson accepted, and left for Saigon immediately. He arrived with the country in chaos, just as the United States was preparing to evacuate and other journalists were scrambling to find transportation out of the region. While there, Thompson learned that Wenner had pulled the plug on this excursion as well, and Thompson found himself in Vietnam without health insurance or additional financial support. Thompson's story about the fall of Saigon would not be published in Rolling Stone until ten years later.[22] Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnamese: Thành Chí Minh) is the largest city in Vietnam, located near the delta of the Mekong River. ... Belligerents Democratic Republic of Vietnam National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Republic of Vietnam Commanders Van Tien Dung Tran Van Tra Hoang Cam Le Duc Anh Nguyen Van Toan Nguyen Hop Doan Strength 100,000 [1] 30,000 [1] Casualties and losses Unknown Unknown The Fall of Saigon...


These two incidents severely strained the relationship between the author and the magazine, and Thompson contributed far less to the publication in later years.


Later years

1980 marked both his divorce from Sandra Conklin and the release of Where the Buffalo Roam, a loose film adaptation of situations from Thompson's early 1970s work, with Bill Murray starring as the author. Murray had to spend several months living with Thompson to get his character down, and it is rumored that during this time Thompson tied Murray to a chair, blind folded him and threw him into a pool[citation needed]. Murray escaped and would go on to become one of Thompson's only trusted friends[citation needed]. Co-actors of Murray's on Saturday Night Live said that it took him months to break Thompson's character and that he would frequently come into the studio smoking a cigarette in a holder[citation needed]. After the lukewarm reception of the film, Thompson temporarily relocated to Hawaii to work on a novel, The Curse of Lono, a gonzo-style account of a marathon held in that state. Extensively illustrated by Ralph Steadman, the piece first appeared in Running magazine in 1981 as "The Charge of the Weird Brigade" and was excerpted in Playboy in 1983.[23] For the first webcomic, see Where the Buffalo Roam (comic). ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Book cover The Curse of Lono is a book by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ...

On July 21, 1981, in Aspen, Colorado, Thompson ran a stop sign at 2 a.m. and began to "rave" at a state trooper. He also refused to take alcohol tests. Because of his refusal he was arrested, but the drunk-driving charges against the journalist were later dropped. Image File history File links Thecurseoflonocover. ... Image File history File links Thecurseoflonocover. ... Book cover The Curse of Lono is a book by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1983, he covered the U.S. invasion of Grenada but would not discuss these experiences until the publication of Kingdom of Fear 20 years later. Later that year he authored a piece for Rolling Stone called "A Dog Took My Place," an exposé of the scandalous Roxanne Pulitzer divorce and what he termed the "Palm Beach lifestyle." The article contained dubious insinuations of bestiality (among other things) but was considered to be a return to proper form by many. For the SHITDISCO album, see Kingdom of Fear (album) Kingdom of Fear; Loathsome Secrets of a Star-Crossed Child In the Final Days of the American Century is a book by Hunter S. Thompson, published in 2003. ... Being largely seasonal, downtown Palm Beachs streets are virtually vacant in the summer. ... Look up Bestiality in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Shortly thereafter, Thompson accepted an advance to write about "couples pornography" for Playboy. As part of his research, he spent time at the Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell Theater strip club in San Francisco and his experience there eventually evolved into a full-length nonfiction novel tentatively titled The Night Manager. Neither the novel nor the article was ever published. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For the book or movie Striptease see Striptease (book) and Striptease (movie) A striptease is a performance, usually a dance, in which the performer gradually removes their clothing for the purposes of sexually arousing the audience, usually performed in nightclubs. ...


In 1990 former porn director Gail Palmer visited Thompson's home in Woody Creek. She later accused him of sexual assault, claiming that he twisted her breast when she refused to join him in the hot tub. She also described cocaine use to authorities. A six person 11 hour search of Thompson's home turned up various kinds of drugs and a few sticks of dynamite.[24] All charges were dismissed after a pre-trial hearing. Thompson would later describe this experience at length in Kingdom of Fear.


By the early 1990s Thompson was said to be working on a fictional novel called Polo Is My Life, which was briefly excerpted in Rolling Stone in 1994, and which Hunter himself described in 1996 as "...a sex book — you know, sex, drugs and rock and roll. It's about the manager of a sex theater who's forced to leave and flee to the mountains. He falls in love and gets in even more trouble than he was in the sex theater in San Francisco".[25] The novel was slated to be released by Random House in 1999, and was even assigned ISBN 0679406948, but was never actually published. // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ...


At the behest of old friend and editor Warren Hinckle, Thompson became a media critic for the San Francisco Examiner from the mid-1980s until the end of that decade. The San Francisco Examiner is a daily newspaper in San Francisco, California, where it has been published continuously since the late 19th Century. ...


Thompson continued to contribute irregularly to Rolling Stone. "Fear and Loathing in Elko," published in 1992, was a well-received fictional rallying cry against Clarence Thomas, while "Mr. Bill's Neighborhood" was a largely non-fictional account of an interview with Bill Clinton in an Arkansas diner. Rather than embarking on the campaign trail as he had done in previous presidential elections, Thompson monitored the proceedings from cable television; Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie, his account of the 1992 campaign, is composed of reactionary faxes sent to Rolling Stone. A decade later, he contributed "Fear and Loathing, Campaign 2004" — an account of a road jaunt with John Kerry during his presidential campaign that would be Thompson's final magazine feature. Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie is a 1994 book written by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


Thompson was named a Kentucky Colonel by the Governor of Kentucky in a December 1996 tribute ceremony where he also received keys to the city of Louisville.[26] This article is about the honorary title. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


The Gonzo Papers

Despite publishing a novel and numerous newspaper and magazine articles, the majority of Thompson's literary output after the late 1970s took the form of a 4-volume series of books called The Gonzo Papers. Beginning with The Great Shark Hunt in 1979 and ending with Better Than Sex in 1994, the series is largely a collection of rare newspaper and magazine pieces from the pre-gonzo period, along with almost all of his Rolling Stone short pieces, excerpts from the Fear and Loathing... books, and so on. The Gonzo Papers Volume One: The Great Shark Hunt The Gonzo Papers is a four volume series of books by American journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson published between 1979 and 1994. ... The Great Shark Hunt is a book written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie is a 1994 book written by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson. ...


By the late 1970s Thompson received complaints from critics, fans and friends that he was regurgitating his past glories without much new on his part;[27] these concerns are alluded to in the introduction of The Great Shark Hunt, where Thompson eerily suggested that his "old self" committed suicide. The Great Shark Hunt is a book written by Hunter S. Thompson. ...


Perhaps in response to this, as well as the strained relationship with Rolling Stone, and the failure of his marriage, Thompson became more reclusive after 1980, often retreating to his compound in Woody Creek and rejecting or refusing to complete assignments. Despite the dearth of new material, Wenner kept Thompson on the Rolling Stone masthead as chief of the "National Affairs Desk," a position he would hold until his death.


Fear and Loathing Redux

Thompson's work was popularized again with the 1998 release of the film Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which opened to considerable fanfare. The novel was reprinted to coincide with the film, and Thompson's work was introduced to a new generation of readers. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is a 1998 film adaptation of Hunter S. Thompsons 1971 novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream. ...


Soon thereafter, Thompson's "long lost" novel The Rum Diary was published, as were the first two volumes of his collected letters, which were greeted with critical acclaim. The Rum Diary, an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson, was written in 1959 but was not published until 1998. ...


Thompson's next, and penultimate, collection, Kingdom of Fear, was a combination of new material, selected newspaper clippings, and some older works. Released in 2003, it was perceived by critics to be an angry, vitriolic commentary on the passing of the American Century and the state of affairs after the September 2001 attacks. For the SHITDISCO album, see Kingdom of Fear (album) Kingdom of Fear; Loathsome Secrets of a Star-Crossed Child In the Final Days of the American Century is a book by Hunter S. Thompson, published in 2003. ... ...


Hunter married Anita Bejmuk, his long-time assistant, on April 24, 2003. is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Thompson ended his journalism career in the same way it had begun: writing about sports. Thompson penned a weekly column called "Hey, Rube" for ESPN.com's "Page 2". The column ran from 2000 to shortly before his death in 2005. Simon & Schuster bundled many of the columns from the first few years and released it in mid-2004 as Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine, and the Downward Spiral of Dumbness - Modern History from the Sports Desk. ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ESPN.com. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... 2005 Cover Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine, and the Downward Spiral of Dumbness is a book comprised of 83 articles in three parts written by Hunter S. Thompson, author and father of Gonzo Journalism. ...


Death

Thompson died at his self-described "fortified compound" known as "Owl Farm" in Woody Creek, Colorado, at 5:42 p.m. on February 20, 2005, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Woody Creek is an unincorporated community in Pitkin County, Colorado. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


Thompson's son (Juan), daughter-in-law (Jennifer Winkel Thompson) and grandson (Will Thompson) were visiting for the weekend at the time of his suicide. Will and Jennifer were in the adjacent room when they heard the gunshot. Mistaking the shot for the sound of a book falling, they continued with their activities for a few minutes before checking on him. Thompson was sitting at his typewriter with the word "counselor" written in the center of the page.[28]


They reported to the press that they do not believe his suicide was out of desperation, but was a well-thought out act resulting from Thompson's many painful medical conditions. Thompson's wife, Anita, who was at a gym at the time of her husband's death, was on the phone with him when he ended his life.


What family and police describe as a suicide note was delivered to his wife four days before his death and later published by Rolling Stone Magazine. Entitled "Football Season Is Over",[29] it read:

"No More Games. No More Bombs. No More Walking. No More Fun. No More Swimming. 67. That is 17 years past 50. 17 more than I needed or wanted. Boring. I am always bitchy. No Fun — for anybody. 67. You are getting Greedy. Act your old age. Relax — This won't hurt"

Artist and friend Ralph Steadman wrote: Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ...

"...He told me 25 years ago that he would feel real trapped if he didn't know that he could commit suicide at any moment. I don't know if that is brave or stupid or what, but it was inevitable. I think that the truth of what rings through all his writing is that he meant what he said. If that is entertainment to you, well, that's OK. If you think that it enlightened you, well, that's even better. If you wonder if he's gone to Heaven or Hell — rest assured he will check out them both, find out which one Richard Milhous Nixon went to — and go there. He could never stand being bored. But there must be Football too — and Peacocks..."[30]

Paul William Roberts in his Toronto Globe and Mail article of Saturday, February 26, 2005 wrote how he imagined an obituary should begin:[31] ...

"Hunter telephoned me on Feb. 19, the night before his death. He sounded scared. It wasn't always easy to understand what he said, particularly over the phone, he mumbled, yet when there was something he really wanted you to understand, you did. He'd been working on a story about the World Trade Center attacks and had stumbled across what he felt was hard evidence showing the towers had been brought down not by the airplanes that flew into them but by explosive charges set off in their foundations. Now he thought someone was out to stop him publishing it: "They're gonna make it look like suicide," he said. "I know how these bastards think..."[31]

However, Roberts goes on to state:

"That's how I imagine a tribute to Hunter S. Thompson should begin. He was indeed working on such a story, but it wasn't what killed him..."[31]

As the Globe and Mail website required pay-per-view for the full article,[31] viewers who only read the partial text mistakenly believed it to be genuine.[32][33] Pay-per-view is the name given to a system by which television viewers can call and order events to be seen on TV and pay for the private telecast of that event to their homes later. ...


Funeral

On 20 August 2005, in a private ceremony, Thompson's ashes were fired from a cannon atop a 153-foot (47 m) tower of his own design (in the shape of a double-thumbed fist clutching a peyote button) to the tune of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man", known to be the song most respected by the late writer. Red, white, blue, and green fireworks were launched along with his ashes. As the city of Aspen would not allow the cannon to remain for more than a month, the cannon has been dismantled and put into storage until a suitable permanent location can be found. According to widow Anita Thompson, the actor Johnny Depp, a close friend of Thompson, financed the funeral. Depp told the Associated Press, "All I'm doing is trying to make sure his last wish comes true. I just want to send my pal out the way he wants to go out."[34] is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Binomial name (Lem. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Mr. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Other famous attendees at the funeral included U.S. Senator John Kerry and former U.S. Senator George McGovern; 60 Minutes correspondents Ed Bradley and Charlie Rose; actors Bill Murray, Benicio Del Toro, Sean Penn, and Josh Hartnett; singers Lyle Lovett and John Oates, the poet Trip Lucid; and numerous other friends. An estimated 280 people attended the funeral. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... Edward Rudolph Bradley, Jr. ... This article is about the American journalist. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Benicio Monserrat Rafael Del Toro Sanchez (born February 19, 1967, in San Germán, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award winning Puerto Rican actor. ... Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... Joshua Daniel Hartnett (born July 21, 1978) is an American actor. ... Lyle Lovett, from the cover of 1996s The Road to Ensenada Lyle Lovett (born in Klein, Texas on November 1, 1957) is an American singer-songwriter. ... -1...


The plans for this monument were initially drawn by Thompson and Ralph Steadman and were shown as part of an Omnibus program on the BBC entitled Fear and Loathing in Gonzovision (1978). It is included as a special feature on the second disc of the 2003 Criterion Collection DVD release of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (labeled on the DVD as "Fear and Loathing on the Road to Hollywood"). The video footage of Steadman and Thompson drawing the plans and outdoor footage showing where he wanted the cannon constructed were played prior to the unveiling of his cannon at the funeral. Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... Omnibus is a television series of the BBC. Categories: | ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Criterion Collection is a joint venture between Janus Films and The Voyager Company that was begun in the mid 1980s for the purpose of releasing authoritative consumer versions of classic and important contemporary films on the laserdisc and DVD formats. ...


Douglas Brinkley, a friend and now the family's spokesman, said of the ceremony: "If that's what he wanted, we'll see if we can pull it off."[35] Douglas Brinkley (born December 14, 1960) is a prolific author and a professor of history at Tulane University, where he also serves as director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization. ...


Legacy

Writing style

Main article: Gonzo journalism

Thompson is often credited as the creator of Gonzo journalism, a style of writing that blurs distinctions between fiction and nonfiction. His work and style are considered to be a major part of the New Journalism literary movement of the 1960s and 1970s, which attempted to break free from the purely objective style of mainstream reportage of the time. Thompson almost always wrote in the first person, while extensively using his own experiences and emotions to color "the story" he was trying to follow. His writing aimed to be humorous, colorful, and bizarre, and he often exaggerated events to be more entertaining. Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... First-person narrative is a literary technique in which the story is narrated by one or more of the characters, who explicitly refers to him or herself in the first person, that is, I. The narrator is thus directly or indirectly involved in the story being told. ...


The term Gonzo has since been applied in kind to numerous other forms of highly subjective artistic expression.


Despite his having personally described his work as "Gonzo," it fell to later observers to describe more precisely what the phrase actually meant. While Thompson's approach clearly involved injecting himself as a participant in the events of the narrative, it also involved adding invented, metaphoric elements, thus creating, for the uninitiated reader, a seemingly confusing amalgam of facts and fiction notable for the deliberately blurred lines between one and the other. Thompson, in a 1974 Interview in Playboy Magazine addressed the issue himself, saying "Unlike Tom Wolfe or Gay Talese, I almost never try to reconstruct a story. They’re both much better reporters than I am, but then, I don’t think of myself as a reporter." Tom Wolfe would later describe Thompson's style as "...part journalism and part personal memoir admixed with powers of wild invention and wilder rhetoric."[36] Playboy is an adult entertainment magazine, or pornography magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ...


The majority of Thompson's most popular and acclaimed work appeared within the pages of Rolling Stone Magazine. Along with Joe Eszterhas and David Felton, Thompson was instrumental in expanding the focus of the magazine past music criticism; indeed, Thompson was the only staff writer of the epoch never to contribute a music feature to the magazine. Nevertheless, his articles were always peppered with a wide array of pop music references ranging from Howlin' Wolf to Lou Reed. Armed with early fax machines wherever he went, he became notorious for haphazardly sending sometimes illegible material to the magazine's San Francisco offices as an issue was about to go to press. Josef Eszterhas (born November 23, 1944) is a controversial Hungarian-American writer, best known for his screenplays for the films Basic Instinct and Showgirls. ... Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ... Lou Reed (born March 2, 1942) is an influential American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... For other uses, see Fax (disambiguation). ...


Robert Love, Thompson's editor of 23 years at Rolling Stone, wrote that "the dividing line between fact and fancy rarely blurred, and we didn’t always use italics or some other typographical device to indicate the lurch into the fabulous. But if there were living, identifiable humans in a scene, we took certain steps....Hunter was close friends with many prominent Democrats, veterans of the ten or more presidential campaigns he covered, so when in doubt, we’d call the press secretary. 'People will believe almost any twisted kind of story about politicians or Washington,' he once said, and he was right."


Discerning the line between the fact and the fiction of Thompson's work presented a practical problem for editors and fact-checkers of his work. Love called fact-checking Thompson's work "one of the sketchiest occupations ever created in the publishing world," and "for the first-timer ... a trip through a journalistic fun house, where you didn’t know what was real and what wasn’t. You knew you had better learn enough about the subject at hand to know when the riff began and reality ended. Hunter was a stickler for numbers, for details like gross weight and model numbers, for lyrics and caliber, and there was no faking it."[37]


Persona

Main article: Raoul Duke

Thompson often used a blend of fiction and fact when portraying himself in his writing as well, sometimes using the name Raoul Duke as an author surrogate whom he generally described as a callous, erratic, self-destructive journalist who constantly drank alcohol and took hallucinogenic drugs. Fantasizing about causing bodily harm to others was also a characteristic in his work and according to the book "Hunter" by E. Jean Carrol, he would often deliver anecdotes about threatening to rape prostitutes, which also could have been jokes and just another example of his brand of humor. Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... As a literary technique, an author surrogate is a character who expresses the ideas, questions, personality and morality of the author. ...


In the late sixties, Thompson obtained his famous title of "Doctor" from the Universal Life Church.[38] He later preferred to be called Dr. Thompson, and his "alter-ego" Raoul Duke called himself a "doctor of journalism". An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Logo The Universal Life Church (or ULC) is a religious organization that offers anyone semi-immediate ordination as a ULC minister free of charge. ... Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ...


A number of critics have commented that as he grew older the line that distinguished Thompson from his literary self became increasingly blurred.[39][40][41] Thompson himself admitted during a 1978 BBC interview that he sometimes felt pressured to live up to the fictional self that he had created, adding "I'm never sure which one people expect me to be. Very often, they conflict - most often, as a matter of fact. ...I'm leading a normal life and right along side me there is this myth, and it is growing and mushrooming and getting more and more warped. When I get invited to, say, speak at universities, I'm not sure if they are inviting Duke or Thompson. I'm not sure who to be."[42]


Thompson's writing style and eccentric persona gave him a cult following in both literary and drug circles, and his cult status expanded into broader areas after being twice portrayed in major motion pictures. Hence, both his writing style and persona have been widely imitated, and his likeness has even become a popular costume choice for Halloween.[43] This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ... This article is about the holiday. ...


Political beliefs

In the documentary Breakfast With Hunter, Hunter S. Thompson can also be seen in several scenes wearing different Che Guevara t-shirts. Breakfast with Hunter:documentary about the everyday life of gonzo-writer Hunter S. Thompson by Wayne Ewing. ... Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Lynch (May 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, el Che, or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, political figure, author, military theorist, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas. ...


Hunter Thompson was a passionate proponent of the right to bear arms and privacy rights.[44] A member of the National Rifle Association,[45] Thompson was also co-creator of "The Fourth Amendment Foundation", an organization to assist victims in defending themselves against unwarranted search and seizure.[46] The Bill of Rights in the National Archives Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution’s Bill of Rights declares a well-regulated militia as being necessary to the security of a free State and prohibits infringement of the right of the people to keep and bear... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... Search and seizure is a legal procedure used in many common law whereby police or other authorities and their agents, who suspect that a crime has been committed, do a search of a persons property and confiscate any relevant evidence to the crime. ...


Part of his work with The Fourth Amendment Foundation centered around support of Lisl Auman, a Colorado woman who was sentenced for life in 1997 under felony murder charges for the death of police officer Bruce VanderJagt, despite contradictory statements and dubious evidence. Thompson organized rallies, provided legal support, and co-wrote an article in the June 2004 issue of Vanity Fair, outlining the case. The Colorado Supreme Court eventually overturned Auman's sentence in March 2005, shortly after Thompson's death, and Auman is now free. Auman's supporters claim Thompson's support and publicity resulted in the successful appeal.[47] Life imprisonment or life incarceration is a sentence of imprisonment for a serious crime, often for most or even all of the criminals remaining life, but in fact for a period which varies between jurisdictions: many countries have a maximum possible period of time (usually 7 to 50 years... The felony murder rule is a legal doctrine according to which anyone who commits, or is found to be involved in, a serious crime (a felony), during which any person dies, is guilty of murder. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... The Colorado Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Colorado. ...


Thompson was a firearms and explosives enthusiast (in his writing and in real life) and owned a vast collection of handguns, rifles, shotguns, and various automatic and semi-automatic weapons, along with numerous forms of gaseous crowd control and many other homemade devices. Firearms redirects here. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shotgun (disambiguation). ... M2 Browning machine gun An automatic firearm is a firearm that automatically extracts and ejects the fired cartridge case, and loads a new case, usually through the energy of the fired round. ... Walther P99, a semi-automatic pistol from the late 1990s A semi-automatic firearm is a gun that requires only a trigger pull for each round that is fired, unlike a single-action revolver, a pump-action firearm, a bolt-action firearm, or a lever-action firearm, which require the... Categories: Stub | Chemical weapons ... Improvised weapons are devices that were not designed to be used as weapons but can be put to that use. ...


Thompson was also an ardent supporter of drug legalization and became known for his less-than-shy accounts of his own drug usage. He was an early supporter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and served on the group's advisory board for over 30 years until his death.[48] He told an interviewer in 1997 that drugs should be legalized "Across the board. It might be a little rough on some people for a while, but I think it's the only way to deal with drugs. Look at Prohibition: all it did was make a lot of criminals rich."[49] Drug liberalization is the process of eliminating or reducing drug prohibition laws. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws or NORML (pronounced normal) is a US-based non-profit corporation whose aim is, according to their most recent mission statement, move public opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of marijuana prohibition so that the responsible use of cannabis by adults... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... Rum-running is the business of smuggling or transporting of alcoholic beverages illegally, usually to circumvent taxation or prohibition. ...


After the September 11th, 2001 attacks, Thompson voiced skepticism regarding the "official story" on who was responsible for the attacks, suggesting to several interviewers that it may have been conducted by the U.S. Government or with the government's assistance.[50][51] In 2002, Thompson told a radio show host "[Y]ou sort of wonder when something like that happens, well, who stands to benefit? Who had the opportunity and the motive? You just kind of look at these basic things [...] I saw that the US government was going to benefit, and the White House people, the Republican administration to take the mind of the public off of the crashing economy. [...] And I have spent enough time on the inside of, well in the White House and you know, campaigns and I've known enough people who do these things, think this way, to know that the public version of the news or whatever event, is never really what happened."[51] The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The cover of the final 9/11 report 9/11 Commission Report, formally titled Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, is the official report of the events leading up to the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... The United States government identified 19 hijackers as being responsible for the September 11, 2001 attacks, and linked the attacks to Osama bin Laden. ... False colors redirects here. ... A variety of conspiracy theories question the mainstream account of the September 11, 2001 attacks against the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Presidency of George W. Bush, also known as the George W. Bush Administration, began on his inauguration on January 20, 2001 as the 43rd and current President of the United States of America. ... The Early 2000s recession was felt in mostly Western countries, affecting the European Union mostly during 2000 and 2001 and the United States mostly in 2002 and 2003. ...


In 2004 Thompson, regarding politics, wrote: "Nixon was a professional politician, and I despised everything he stood for — but if he were running for president this year against the evil Bush-Cheney gang, I would happily vote for him."[52] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The Presidency of George W. Bush, also known as the George W. Bush Administration, began on his inauguration on January 20, 2001 as the 43rd and current President of the United States of America. ...


Popular slogans

A slogan of Thompson's, "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro," appears as a chapter heading in Kingdom of Fear. He was also quoted as saying, "I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me." Another one of his favorite sayings, "Buy the ticket, take the ride," is easily applied to virtually all of his exploits. "Too weird to live, too rare to die," a phrase applied to Oscar Zeta Acosta (Thompson's attorney from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas), has been widely used to characterize the "Good Doctor" posthumously. In Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, he coined the term "bad craziness." He occasionally used the phrase, "There are many rooms in the mansion" in his non-fiction writings. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


The Hawaiian word "mahalo" also frequently appears in Thompson's works and correspondence. Loosely translated, it means "may you be in divine breath" or "thank you." On more than one occasion, "mahalo" followed Thompson's usage of "buy the ticket, take the ride." "Mahalo" is sometimes replaced with the untranslatable Hebrew word "selah". Mahalo is a Hawaiian word meaning thank you. ... For other uses, see Selah (disambiguation). ...


Letters

The Proud Highway...Fear and Loathing Letters Vol. 1

Thompson wrote many letters and they were his primary means of personal conversation. Thompson made carbon copies of all his letters, usually typed, a habit that began in his teenage years. His letters were sent to friends, public officials and reporters. Image File history File links Proudhighway. ... Image File history File links Proudhighway. ... Carbon copying, often abbreviated to c. ...


Some of his letters have begun to be published in a series of books called The Fear and Loathing Letters. The first volume, The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman 1955 - 1967, is over 650 pages, while the second volume Fear and Loathing in America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist passed 700. Douglas Brinkley, who edits the letter series, said that for every letter included, fifteen were cut. Brinkley estimated Thompson's own archive to contain over 20,000 letters. According to Amazon.com, the last of the three planned volumes of Thompson's letters was allegedly to be published on January 1, 2007 as The Mutineer: Rants, Ravings, and Missives from the Mountaintop 1977-2005. Anita Thompson has said on her blog that the collection will be released sometime in February. Amazon.com recently updated the publication date on its site to February 1, 2009. Douglas Brinkley (born December 14, 1960) is a prolific author and a professor of history at Tulane University, where he also serves as director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization. ... Amazon. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Many biographies have been written about Thompson, although he did not write an autobiography himself. But his letters contained "asides" to "his biographers" that he assumed could be "reading in" on his collected letters. Some of these letters were already bundled into Thompson's Kingdom of Fear, though it is not considered an autobiography. For other uses, see Biography (disambiguation). ... For writing autobiographies on Wikipedia, see WP:Autobiography. ...


Photography

Thompson was an avid amateur photographer throughout his life and his photos have been exhibited since his death at art galleries in the United States and United Kingdom. In late 2006, AMMO Books published a limited-edition 224 page collection of Thompson photos called GONZO, with an introduction by Johnny Depp. Thompson's snapshots were a combination of the subjects he was covering, stylized self-portraits, and artistic still life photos. The London Observer called the photos "astonishingly good" and that "Thompson's pictures remind us, brilliantly in every sense, of very real people, real colours".[53] A photographer at the Calgary Folk Music Festival Paparazzi at the Tribeca Film Festival A photographer is a person who takes a photograph using a camera. ... A still life is a work of art which represents a subject composed of inanimate objects. ... The Observer is a United Kingdom newspaper published on Sundays. ...


Movies

The film Where the Buffalo Roam (1980) depicts Thompson's attempts at writing stories for both the Super Bowl and the 1972 U.S. presidential election. It stars Bill Murray as Thompson and Peter Boyle as Thompson's attorney Oscar Acosta, referred to in the movie as Carl Lazlo, Esq. Murray spent considerable time with Thompson as part of his preparation prior to production of film and inevitably picked up many of the latter's mannerisms, much to the annoyance of Murray's Saturday Night Live co-workers.[citation needed] For the first webcomic, see Where the Buffalo Roam (comic). ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Peter Lawrence Boyle (October 18, 1935 – December 12, 2006)[1][2] was an Emmy Award-winning American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Frank Barone on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... SNL redirects here. ...


The 1998 film adaptation of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was directed by Monty Python veteran Terry Gilliam, and starred Johnny Depp (who moved into Hunter's basement to 'study' Thompson's persona before assuming his role in the film) as "Hunter Thompson/Raoul Duke" and Benicio del Toro as Oscar Acosta, referred to in the movie as "Dr. Gonzo". According to Thompson in The Great Shark Hunt, Thompson's editors demanded that Acosta not be referred to by name due to possible legal action for defamation. The film has achieved something of a cult following. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is a 1998 film adaptation of Hunter S. Thompsons 1971 novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream. ... Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream is a novel by Hunter S. Thompson, illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Benicio Monserrat Rafael Del Toro Sanchez (born February 19, 1967, in San Germán, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award winning Puerto Rican actor. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Great Shark Hunt is a book written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ...


A film is currently in production based on Thompson's novel The Rum Diary. It is scheduled for a 2008 release, starring Johnny Depp as the main character, Paul Kemp. Kemp's experiences are based loosely on, or inspired by, Thompson's own experiences in Puerto Rico. Bruce Robinson is directing. The Rum Diary, an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson, was written in 1959 but was not published until 1998. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Paul S. Kemp is a fantasy author from Wizards of the Coast. ... Bruce Robinson (born May 1, 1946) is a British writer, actor and director, best known for his film Withnail and I. He was born in Broadstairs in Kent and studied at the Central School of Speech and Drama in London. ...


Documentaries

"Fear and Loathing on the Road to Hollywood" (1978) is an extended television profile by the BBC. It can be found on disc 2 of "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" The Criterion Collection edition. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The Mitchell brothers, owners of the O'Farrell Theatre in San Francisco, made a documentary about Thompson in 1988 called Hunter S. Thompson: The Crazy Never Die. The Mitchell brothers (James Jim Lloyd Mitchell, November 30, 1943–July 12, 2007 and Artie Jay Mitchell, December 17, 1945–February 27, 1991) were pioneers in the pornography and striptease club business in San Francisco and other parts of California from 1969 until 1991, when Jim was convicted of killing...


Wayne Ewing created three documentaries about Thompson. The film Breakfast With Hunter (2003) was directed and edited by Ewing. It documents Thompson's work on the movie Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, his arrest for drunk driving, and his subsequent fight with the court system. When I Die (2005) is a video chronicle of making Thompson's final farewell wishes a reality, and documents the send-off itself. Free Lisl: Fear and Loathing in Denver (2006) chronicle's Thompson efforts in helping to free Lisl Auman who was sentenced to life in prison without parole for the shooting of a police officer, a crime she didn't commit. All three films are only available from http://www.hunterthompsonfilms.com/ Breakfast with Hunter:documentary about the everyday life of gonzo-writer Hunter S. Thompson by Wayne Ewing. ... Drunk driving (drink driving in the UK) or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (i. ... When I Die is the eleventh track on New Found Glorys album Coming Home. ...


In Come on Down: Searching for the American Dream[54] (2004) Thompson gives director Adamm Liley insight into the nature of the American Dream over drinks at the Woody Creek Tavern.


Buy The Ticket, Take The Ride: Hunter S. Thompson On Film (2006) was directed by Tom Thurman, written by Tom Marksbury, and produced by the Starz Entertainment Group. The original documentary features interviews with Thompson’s inner circle of family and friends, but the thrust of the film focuses on the manner in which his life often overlapped with numerous Hollywood celebrities who became his close friends, such as Johnny Depp, Benicio del Toro, Bill Murray, Sean Penn, John Cusack, Thompson’s wife Anita, son Juan, former Senators George McGovern and Gary Hart, writers Tom Wolfe and William F. Buckley, actors Gary Busey and Harry Dean Stanton, and the illustrator Ralph Steadman among others. The Starz Entertainment Group (formally the Starz Encore Group) is a wholly-owned television programming subsidiary of Liberty Media Corp. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Benicio Monserrat Rafael Del Toro Sanchez (born February 19, 1967, in San Germán, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award winning Puerto Rican actor. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA-winning American comedian and actor. ... Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... -1... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... For other persons named Gary Hart, see Gary Hart (disambiguation). ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... William Gareth Jacob Gary Busey, Sr. ... Harry Dean Stanton (born July 14, 1926 in West Irvine, Kentucky, USA) is an American actor. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ...


"Blasted!!! The Gonzo Patriots of Hunter S. Thompson" (2006), produced, directed, photographed and edited by Blue Kraning, is a documentary about the scores of fans who volunteered their privately-owned artillery to fire the ashes of the late author, Hunter S Thompson. Blasted!!! premiered at the 2006 Starz Denver International Film Festival, part of a tribute series to Hunter S. Thompson held at the Denver Press Club.


In 2008, Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Taxi to the Dark Side) wrote and directed a documentary on Thompson, entitled Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson. The film premiered on January 20, 2008 at the Sundance Film Festival. Gibney uses intimate, never-before-seen home videos, interviews with friends, enemies and lovers, and clips from films adapted from Thompson's material to document his turbulent life. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Alex Gibney is am Emmy- and Grammy-award winning American director and movie producer. ... Taxi to the Dark Side is a documentary directed by American film-maker Alex Gibney. ... The Sundance Film Festival is a film festival in the state of Utah in the United States. ...


Accolades and tributes

  • Author Tom Wolfe has called Thompson the greatest American comic writer of the 20th century.[55]
  • The 2006 documentary film Fuck, which features Hunter S Thompson commenting on the usage of that word, is dedicated to his memory.[56]
  • Thompson appeared on the cover of the 1,000th Rolling Stone issue (May 18 - June 1, 2006). He appeared as a devil playing the guitar next to the two "L"'s in the word "Rolling Stone". Johnny Depp also appeared on the cover.
    • Hunter Thompson appears as Uncle Duke in Doonesbury, the Garry Trudeau comic strip. (Raoul Duke was a pseudonym used by Thompson.) When the character was first introduced, Thompson protested, (he was once quoted in an interview saying that he would set Trudeau on fire if the two ever met)[57] although it was reported that he liked the character in later years.
    • Between 7 March 2005 (roughly two weeks after Thompson's suicide) and 12 March 2005, Doonesbury ran a tribute to Hunter, with Uncle Duke lamenting the death of the man he called his "inspiration." The first of these strips featured a panel with artwork similar to that of Ralph Steadman, and later strips featured various non sequiturs (with Duke variously transforming into a monster, melting, shrinking to the size of an empty drinking glass, or people around him turning into animals) which seemed to mirror some of the effects of hallucinatory drugs described in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.
  • Besides Uncle Duke, Hunter was the direct inspiration of two other comic strip characters. Underground comix creator turned animation/cartooning historian Scott Shaw! used an anthropomorphic dog named "Pointer X. Toxin" in a number of his works. Matt Howarth has created a number of comic books in his "Bugtown" universe with a Thompson-inspired character named "Monseiuer Boche", as well as a musician named "Savage Henry", the name of a drug dealer (or "scag baron") mentioned in Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas.
  • In The Simpsons episode "Viva Ned Flanders" a scene occurs when Ned Flanders and Homer Simpson drive down a highway to Las Vegas, passing a car containing two passengers, resembling Ralph Steadman's artwork for the initial publication of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas in Rolling Stone magazine.
  • Spider Jerusalem, the gonzo journalist protagonist of Warren Ellis's Transmetropolitan, is largely based on Thompson.
  • Adult Swim's animated series The Venture Bros. featured a character named Hunter Gathers (who looks and acts much like Thompson) employed by the fictional Office of Secret Intelligence as a trainer.

For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... For the 1969 film by Andy Warhol, see Blue Movie. ... This article is about the magazine. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Uncle Duke is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mr. ... Scott Shaw (often spelled Scott Shaw!) is a United States cartoonist and animator. ... Artist/cartoonist who created, among other things, Those Annoying Post Brothers and Savage Henry. ... Bugtown is a fictional city that is the setting of several comic books and novels written by Matt Howarth. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Viva Ned Flanders is the tenth episode of The Simpsons tenth season. ... Nedward Ned Flanders is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... The hard cover version of the book. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Spider Jerusalem is a fictional character and the protagonist of the comic book Transmetropolitan, created by writer Warren Ellis and artist Darick Robertson, published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... This article is about the comic book author. ... Transmetropolitan is a postcyberpunk comic book series written by Warren Ellis with art by Darick Robertson and published by DC Comics. ... Adult Swim, usually stylized [adult swim], is an adult-oriented television network sharing channel space with Cartoon Network in the United States. ... The Venture Bros. ... This is a list of main and recurring fictional characters and organizations from The Venture Bros. ...

Bibliography

This is a bibliography of works by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Whitmer, Peter O. (1993). When The Going Gets Weird: The Twisted Life and Times of Hunter S. Thompson, First Edition, Hyperion, 23-27. ISBN 1562828568. 
  2. ^ Rolfsen, Jeff (Feb. 21, 2005) Writer Hunter S. Thompson commits suicide. Air Force Times. (Accessed 22 February 2007.)
  3. ^ Thompson, Hunter (2002). Songs of the Doomed, Reprint Edition, Simon and Schuster, 29-32. ISBN 0743240995. 
  4. ^ a b c Thompson, Hunter (1998). in Douglas Brinkley: The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman, 1st ed., Ballantine Books, 139. ISBN 0-345-37796-6. 
  5. ^ New York State Writers Institute William Kennedy Biography.
  6. ^ Hunter S. Thompson: "Proud Highway" NPR Interview 7 August 1997
  7. ^ Brinkley, Douglas (24 March 2005) "Last Days at Owl Farm" Rolling Stone.
  8. ^ Brinkley, Douglas or Sadler, Shelby. Thompson, Hunter (2000). in Douglas Brinkley: Fear and Loathing in America, 1st ed., Simon & Schuster, 784. ISBN 0-684-87315-X.  Introduction to letter to Tom Wolfe, p.43.
  9. ^ Louison, Cole This is skag folks, pure skag: Hunter Thompson Buzzsaw Haircut Retrieved 12 October 2006.
  10. ^ Fremont-Smith, Eliot (23 February 1967) "Books of The Times; Motorcycle Misfits—Fiction and Fact." The New York Times, p.33.
  11. ^ Thompson, Hunter S. [[The Hashbury Is the Capital of the Hippie http://ugly-flashbacks.livejournal.com/1843.html]] The New York Times Magazine 17 May 1967
  12. ^ d. | publisher=Simon & Schuster | id=ISBN 978-0684873169 | pages = 784}}{{cite book | | last=Thompson | first=Hunter | authorlink=Hunter Thompson | editor = | year=2001 | title= Fear and Loathing in America | edition=2nd e
  13. ^ Thompson, Hunter (2001). Fear and Loathing in America, 2nd ed., Simon & Schuster, 784. ISBN 978-0684873169. 
  14. ^ Thompson, Hunter (2006). Fear and Loathing in America, Paperback Edition., Simon & Schuster, 784. ISBN 978-0684873169. 
  15. ^ Anson, Robert Sam (December 10, 1976) Rolling Stone Pt. 2: Hunter Thompson Meets Fear and Loathing Face to Face New Times
  16. ^ Thompson, Hunter S. (2003) Kingdom of Fear Simon & Schuster. p.95.
  17. ^ Martin, Douglas, (March 16, 2006) Bill Cardoso, 68, Editor Who Coined 'Gonzo', Is Dead. The New York Times.
  18. ^ Thompson, Hunter (1979). The Great Shark Hunt: Strange Tales from a Strange Time, 1st ed., Summit Books, 105-109. ISBN 0-671-40046-0. 
  19. ^ Woods, Crawford (July 23, 1972) [1] The New York Times Book Review.
  20. ^ Thompson, Hunter S. (June 15, 1994) He Was A Crook Rolling Stone
  21. ^ Anson, Robert Sam (December 10, 1976) Rolling Stone Pt. 2: Hunter Thompson Meets Fear and Loathing Face to Face New Times
  22. ^ Anson, Robert Sam (December 10, 1976) Rolling Stone Pt. 2: Hunter Thompson Meets Fear and Loathing Face to Face New Times
  23. ^ The Great Thompson Hunt - Books - The Curse of Lono
  24. ^ Aspen Journal; New Fear and Loathing: Gonzo Writer on Trial, The New York Times, 22 May 1990
  25. ^ Sara Nelson 1996 Interview with Hunter S. Thompson The Book Report
  26. ^ Whitehead, Ron. Hunter S. Thompson, Kentucky Colonel Reykjaviks Magazine March 11, 2005 http://www.grapevine.is/default.aspx?show=paper&part=fullstory&id=281
  27. ^ The Great Thompson Hunt - HST & Friends - Rolling Stone College Papers 1980
  28. ^ Pitkin County Sheriff's Dept. (March 2, 2005) Incident Report 4391
  29. ^ "Football Season Is Over", Rolling Stone Magazine.
  30. ^ Steadman, Ralph (Feb. 2005). "Hunter S. Thompson 1937-2005". Retrieved March 19, 2005.
  31. ^ a b c d Willliams, Paul. "Alexander Pope in a prose convertible". Toronto Globe and Mail
  32. ^ Hunter S. Thompson Predicted His Murder Would Be Labeled "Suicide" - theworldforum.org
  33. ^ "Hunter S. Thompson obituary spawns "murder" theory" - Wikinews
  34. ^ Hunter Thompson Blown Sky High
  35. ^ Elliott, Dan — Associated Press "Thompson's send-off could fill skies"
  36. ^ Wolfe, Tom (February 22, 2005) As Gonzo in Life as in His Work
  37. ^ Love, Robert. (May-June 2005) A Technical Guide For Editing Gonzo. Columbia Journalism Review. Accessed 20 February 2007.
  38. ^ The Great Thompson Hunt - HST & Friends - Who Is (Dr.) Hunter S. Thompson?
  39. ^ Cohen, Rich "Gonzo Nights The New York Times April 17, 2005
  40. ^ Hart, Stephen Hunter S. Thompson The Opinion Mill December 26, 2005.
  41. ^ Clifford, Peggy A love song for Hunter S. Thompson Santa Monica Mirror Retrieved March 28, 2007.
  42. ^ BBC 1978 Fear and Loathing in Gonzovision
  43. ^ hunter s thompson halloween
  44. ^ Glassie, John Interview with Hunter S. Thompson Salon.com. Accessed Monday, March 5, 2007
  45. ^ Susman, Tina Writer's Death Shocks Friends Newsday Feb 22, 2005
  46. ^ Higgins, Matt THE GONZO KING An interview with Hunter S. Thompson High Times September 2, 2003.
  47. ^ Mosely, Matt. "Lisl Released From Tooley Hall" www.lisl.com April 26, 2006
  48. ^ NORML 2007 Aspen Legal Seminar Afternoon Cookout at Owl Farm.
  49. ^ Far Gone Books Transcript of Hunter S. Thompson Interview
  50. ^ Bulger, Adam (March, 9, 2004) Interview with Hunter S. Thompson Freezer Box Magazine
  51. ^ a b O'Regan, Mike. Interview with Hunter S. Thompson, August 2002.
  52. ^ Fear and Loathing, Campaign 2004, Rolling Stone.
  53. ^ Ferguson, Euan Hunter Gets Captured By The Frame London Observer February 4th, 2007
  54. ^ Manifestation.tv
  55. ^ "As Gonzo in Life as in His Work: Hunter S. Thompson died as he lived." Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - Wall Street Journal, Opinion Journal.
  56. ^ Premiere - Fuck
  57. ^ Hunter S. Thompson dead at 67

Hyperion is a general-interest book publishing division of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. ... Air Force Times is a weekly newspaper serving active, reserve and retired United States Air Force and National Guard personnel and their families, providing career-related news and information as well as community and lifestyle features, educational supplements, and resource guides. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the SHITDISCO album, see Kingdom of Fear (album) Kingdom of Fear; Loathsome Secrets of a Star-Crossed Child In the Final Days of the American Century is a book by Hunter S. Thompson, published in 2003. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The New York Times Book Review is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ...

Legacy and obituaries

This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Arik Hesseldahl (born in 1970) is an American journalist currently working as a senior technology writer for BusinessWeek, a position hes had since 2005. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... For other uses, see Slate (disambiguation). ... D.A. Blyler (born July 13, 1967) is the author of the expatriate novel Steffi’s Club (BurnhillWolf, 2003) and two published works of poetry, Shared Solitude and Diary of a Seducer (a collaboration with painter and filmmaker Marcus Reichert). ... The Raw Story is a left-leaning news and politics weblog founded in 2004. ... D.A. Blyler (born July 13, 1967) is the author of the expatriate novel Steffi’s Club (BurnhillWolf, 2003) and two published works of poetry, Shared Solitude and Diary of a Seducer (a collaboration with painter and filmmaker Marcus Reichert). ... The Raw Story is a left-leaning news and politics weblog founded in 2004. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... H2G2 is also an acronym for the The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... The eXile, founded in 1997, is a Moscow-based English-language biweekly free newspaper, aimed at the citys expatriate community, which combines outrageous, sometimes satirical, content with investigative reporting. ... John Dolan (Born 1955) is an American poet, writer, and essayist. ...

Source material

Persondata
NAME Thompson, Hunter Stockton
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American journalist and author
DATE OF BIRTH July 18, 1937(1937-07-18)
PLACE OF BIRTH Louisville, Kentucky, United States
DATE OF DEATH February 20, 2005
PLACE OF DEATH Woody Creek, Colorado, United States
The Rum Diary, an early novel by American writer Hunter S. Thompson, was written in 1959 but was not published until 1998. ... For the 1998 film adaptation of the novel, see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (film). ... For the SHITDISCO album, see Kingdom of Fear (album) Kingdom of Fear; Loathsome Secrets of a Star-Crossed Child In the Final Days of the American Century is a book by Hunter S. Thompson, published in 2003. ... The cover, illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... Cover of Screw-Jack, and other stories. ... The Gonzo Papers Volume One: The Great Shark Hunt The Gonzo Papers is a four volume series of books by American journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson published between 1979 and 1994. ... The Great Shark Hunt is a book written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Gonzo Papers, Vol. ... Gonzo Papers, Vol. ... Cover of Screw-Jack, and other stories. ... Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie is a 1994 book written by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson. ... Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail 72 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... 2005 Cover Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine, and the Downward Spiral of Dumbness is a book comprised of 83 articles in three parts written by Hunter S. Thompson, author and father of Gonzo Journalism. ... The article title as it first appeared in Rolling Stone magazine. ... The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved is an article by Hunter S. Thompson that first appeared in a June 1970 issue of Scanlans Monthly magazine. ... Strange Rumblings in Aztlan is an article published in Rolling Stone #81, dated April 29, 1971 and written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... The Temptations of Jean-Claude Killy is an article published in the premiere issue of Scanlans Monthly magazine in March 1970, written by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Book cover The Curse of Lono is a book by Hunter S. Thompson. ... Mistah Leary - He Dead is a chapbook written by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson and published by the X-Ray Book Co. ... This is a bibliography of works by American author and journalist Hunter S. Thompson. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Woody Creek is an unincorporated community in Pitkin County, Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m