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Encyclopedia > Hunter College

Hunter College of The City University of New York

Motto Mihi cura futuri(Latin)
("Mine is the care of the future")
Established 1870
Type Public
President Jennifer Raab
Faculty 544
Undergraduates 15,566
Postgraduates 5,743
Location New York, New York, Flag of United States United States
Campus Urban
Mascot Hawk
Website hunter.cuny.edu
See also: Hunter College High School

Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Hunter, apart from being the largest of the CUNY colleges, is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. It is also one of the country's most diverse schools; Hunter has students hailing from 84 countries and speaking approximately 40 languages. The college is particularly noted for its professional schools in education, health sciences, nursing, and social work. Its Masters program in Fine Art is well-respected in the contemporary art world. Hunter College logo from maxweber. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A public school, has two distinct meanings: elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials or in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, a private boarding school, generally not coeducational, that prepares students for the university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... NY redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... The city of San Francisco, an example of an urban area. ... A mascot, originally a fetish-like term for any person, animal, or thing supposed to bring luck, is now something—typically an animal or human character—used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot... Hawks redirects here. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... Hunter College High School, colloquially known as Hunter or HCHS, is a New York City magnet secondary school for gifted students located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park and the East River. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... Contemporary art refers to recently produced visual art. ...

Contents

History

Founding

Thomas Hunter Hall, on Lexington Avenue
Thomas Hunter Hall, on Lexington Avenue

Hunter College has its origins in the nineteenth-century movement for normal school training which swept across the United States. Hunter descends from the Female Normal and High School (later renamed the Normal College of the City of New York), organized in New York City in 1870. Founded by Irish immigrant Thomas Hunter, who was president of the school during the first 37 years, it was originally a women's college for training teachers. The school, which was housed in an armory and saddle store at Broadway and East Fourth Street in Manhattan, was open to all qualified women, irrespective of race, religion or ethnic background, which was incongruent to the prevailing admission practices of other schools during this era. Created by the New York State Legislature, Hunter was deemed the only approved institution for those seeking to teach in New York City during this time. The school incorporated an elementary and high school for gifted children, where students practiced teaching. In 1887, a kindergarten was established as well. (Today, the elementary school and the high school still exist at a different location, and are now called the Hunter Campus Schools.) Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (900 × 675 pixel, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hunter College Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (900 × 675 pixel, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hunter College Metadata... A normal school is an institution for training teachers. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Thomas Hunter was an immigrant from Ireland to the United States. ... Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... Gifted children are those considered by educational systems to have significantly higher than normal levels of one or more forms of intelligence. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... A kindergarten classroom in Afghanistan. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Hunter College High School, colloquially known as Hunter or HCHS, is a New York City magnet secondary school for gifted students located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ...


During Thomas Hunter's tenure as president of the school, Hunter became known for its impartiality regarding race, religion, ethnicity, financial or political favoritism; its pursuit of higher education for women; its high entry requirements; and its rigorous academics. The college's student population quickly expanded, and the college subsequently moved uptown, into a new Gothic structure, now known as Thomas Hunter Hall, on Lexington Avenue between 68th and 69th Streets. Königsberg Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ...


In 1888 the school was incorporated as a college under the statutes of New York State, with the power to confer the degree of A.B. This led to the separation of the school into two "camps": the "Normals," who pursued a four-year course of study to become licensed teachers, and the "Academics," who sought non-teaching professions and the Bachelor of Arts degree. After 1902 when the "Normal" course of study was abolished, the "Academic" course became standard across the student body. Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Expansion

In 1914 the Normal College became Hunter College in honor of its first president. At the same time, the college was experiencing a period of great expansion as increasing student enrollments necessitated more space. The college reacted by establishing branches in the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. By 1920, Hunter College had the largest enrollment of women of any municipally financed college in the United States. In 1930, Hunter's Brooklyn campus merged with City College's Brooklyn campus, and the two were spun off to form Brooklyn College. 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Brooklyn (named for the Dutch city Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The City College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as City College of New York or simply City College, CCNY, or colloquially as City)[1] is a senior college of the City University of New York, in New York City. ... Brooklyn College is a senior college of the City University of New York, located in Brooklyn, New York. ...


The late 1930s saw the construction of Hunter College in the Bronx (later known as the Bronx Campus). During the Second World War, Hunter leased the Bronx Campus buildings to the United States Navy who used the facilities to train 95,000 women volunteers for military service as WAVES. When the Navy vacated the campus, the site was briefly occupied by the nascent United Nations, which held its first Security Council sessions at the Bronx Campus in 1946, giving the school an international profile. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... A WAVES Photographer 3rd Class The WAVES were a World War II era division of the U.S. Navy that consisted entirely of women. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


In 1943, Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated a town house at 47-49 East 65th Street in Manhattan to the college. The house had been a home for the future President and First Lady. Today it is known as Roosevelt House and is undergoing renovation to become an academic center. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... FDR redirects here. ...


The CUNY Era

Hunter became the women's college of the municipal system, and in the 1950s, when City College became coeducational, Hunter started admitting men to its Bronx campus. In 1964, the Manhattan campus began admitting men also. The Bronx campus subsequently became Lehman College in 1968. Womens colleges in the United States were primarly founded during the early 19th century. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... The City College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as City College of New York or simply City College, CCNY, or colloquially as City)[1] is a senior college of the City University of New York, in New York City. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Lehman College is one of the constituent colleges of the City University of New York, USA. Founded in 1931 as the Bronx campus of Hunter College, the school became an independent college within the City University in 1968. ...


In 1968-1969, Black and Puerto Rican students struggled to get a department that would teach about their history and experience. These and supportive students and faculty expressed this demand through building take-overs, rallies, etc. In Spring 1969, Hunter College established Black and Puerto Rican Studies (now called Africana/Puerto Rican and Latino Studies). An "open admissions" policy initiated in 1970 by the City University of New York opened the school's doors to historically underrepresented groups by guaranteeing a college education to any and all who graduated from NYC high schools. Many African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Puerto Ricans, and students from the developing world made their presence felt at Hunter, and even after the end of "open admissions" still comprise a large part of the school's student body. As a result of the this increase in enrollment, Hunter opened new buildings on Lexington Avenue during the early 1980s. In further advancing Puerto Rican studies, Hunter became home to the Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños ("Center for Puerto Rican Studies" or simply "Centro") in 1982. 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Today, Hunter College is a comprehensive teaching and research institution. Of the more than 20,000 students enrolled at Hunter, nearly 5,000 are enrolled in a graduate program, the most popular of which are education and social work. Although less than 28% of students are the first in their families to attend college, the college maintains its tradition of concern for women's education, with nearly three out of four students being female. In 2006, Hunter became home to the Bella Abzug Leadership Institute, which will run training programs for young women to build their leadership, public speaking, business and advocacy skills. Princeton Review named the college as one of America's "Best Value" Colleges in its 2007 guide. Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... Bella Abzug Bella Savitsky Abzug (July 24, 1920 – March 31, 1998) was a well-known Jewish American political figure and a leader of the womens movement. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


In recent years, the college has integrated its undergraduate and graduate programs to successfully make advanced programs in fields such as (Psychology and Biology) - "Ph.D Program", (Education) - "Master's Program", (Mathematics) - "Master's Program", -"Ph.D Program"(Biology & Chemistry) - "Biochemistry", (Accounting) - "Master's Program" along with the highly competitive (Economics) - "Master's Program" to which only a select few students may enter based on excellent scholarship and performance, and less than half will earn a Master's Degree by maintaining a nearly perfect academic record and performing thesis research. Psychology is an academic or applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes such as perception, cognition, emotion, personality, behavior, and interpersonal relationships. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Current Issues

Academic Freedom

In recent years, but particularly after the September 11, 2001 attacks, conservative students and faculty nationwide have rallied around David Horowitz and his arguments that colleges by and large impose a liberal agenda. As a result, colleges have come under pressure to adopt codes of academic freedom to ensure that professors do not impose their own beliefs on to students who may disagree with them politically. Conversely, many professors have expressed concern that college administrators are retaliating against faculty members who dissent either on administrative or political issues. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... David Joel Horowitz (born January 10, 1939) is an American conservative writer and activist. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ...


At Hunter, the College Senate (consisting of student government, faculty, and administrators) established a committee in 2004 to investigate issues of academic freedom.[1] The committee found that no faculty member was "pressured to make changes in the content or form of their classroom teaching." However, the committee did report allegations that departmental administrators imposed certain policies without a basis in student need and without consultation with faculty. The committee further reported on allegations that administrators unduly influenced faculty hiring and tenure decisions, bypassing formal governance procedures. Finally, the committee found that a "perception of a climate of fear" has dissuaded some faculty from engaging in discussions about college policy.


Additionally, PSC-CUNY, the faculty labor union, was charged by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in 2005 to conduct a survey of academic freedom among faculty in furtherance of the findings of the College Senate committee.[2] The survey was conducted in 2006 and found that "only 22 percent of the respondents were satisfied in the faculty's role in shared governance," and only "44 percent ... agreed that the campus climate supports their personal freedom of expression." The survey also found that "23 percent of the respondents, and 30 percent of the full-time tenured faculty, said they had been subject to reprisals from the president or senior administrators." Finally, the survey found that "the faculty and staff have not had influence on major institutional issues in recent years," due to the failure of administrators to properly integrate faculty input. Some professors have expressed concerns as to the accuracy of the PSC/AAUP survey, claiming that its questions were biased and it was developed without a transparent process.[3] A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization of professors and other academics in the United States. ...


Manhattan/Hunter College Science High School

As a partnership with the New York City Department of Education, the Manhattan/Hunter College Science High School was opened in 2003 on the campus of the former Martin Luther King, Jr. High School on the Upper West Side. Unlike Hunter's campus schools, Hunter Science does not require an entrance exam for admission.[4] The New York City Department of Education is a department of the city of New York which runs almost all of the citys public schools. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ...


Curriculum

In 2006, students of Hunter College petitioned for changes in the curriculum, namely in the Political Science Department. According to an independent study[5], Political Science Majors at the college received an average GPA of 3.47 (Compared to 3.62 with other Major Universities in New York), yet were assigned almost double the reading materials and writing assignments, which when compared to other schools, where found to be of difficulty beyond that required or expected of an undergraduate student. The students have expressed that they find this matter "unfair", since it may jeapordize their acceptance to either Graduate Schools or Law Schools by reflecting a lower GPA. The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


Similar concerns have been expressed by science majors at the college, namely Biology, Biochemistry, and Chemistry majors. However, those departments claim that "there is a price to pay in maintaining the level of education needed to ensure success after one's undergraduate degree, the rewards do not lie in a student's grades today, but in his or her success tomorrow"[6]. Students have in fact shown higher scores on exams such as the MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) and the DAT (Dental Admission Test) when compared to other CUNY schools[7]. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized test administered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) to prospective medical students as a means to standardise comparison between them for purposes of admission to medical school. ... DAT can mean: day after tomorrow, a J-Pop band. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym usually pronounced kyoo-nee or coo-nee), located in New York City, is the largest urban university in the United States, with more than 208,000 enrolled in degree programs and another 208,000 enrolled in adult and continuing education courses at...


Sexual Harassment

In 2005, and then again in 2006, Hunter College had closed access to the 17th floor bathrooms due to a series of harassment incidents that several young girls had claimed, "were just waiting to happen on an empty floor like the 17th"[8]. However, after these incidents had taken place, the college administration ordered for the 17th floor bathrooms to be put out of order, and for students to use safer restroom facilities that are slightly more populated to ensure security and to prevent these incidents from occurring ever again. Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ...


Julia Richman Education Complex

The college is currently raising funds to purchase the Julia Richman Education Complex (JREC), a public high school building, with plans to raze it and build a science building on the site. JREC's location at East 67th Street at Second Avenue, near Hunter's main 68th Street campus, makes the site attractive for the college's expansion. College president Jennifer Raab and opponents of the expansion have traded opinion articles in local newspapers throughout 2006.[9] Main article: Secondary education High school is a name used in some parts of the world, and particularly in North America, to describe the last segment of compulsory education. ...


Campus

Hunter College's official street address is 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021. Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004) Park Avenue (formerly Fourth Avenue) is a wide boulevard that carries traffic north and south in Manhattan in New York City. ...


The college is anchored by its main campus at East 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, a modern complex of three towers — the East, West, and North Buildings — and Thomas Hunter Hall, all of which are interconnected by skywalks. The college boasts a Park Avenue address by virtue of the North Building, which stretches from 68th to 69th Streets along Park Avenue. The main campus is served by the No. 6 line of the New York City Subway (68th Street-Hunter College station). The 6 Lexington Avenue Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system operated by the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... 68th Street–Hunter College is a local station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Lexington Avenue and 68th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. ...


The health sciences schools, including the Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing and the School of Health Sciences, are located at East 25th Street and First Avenue, in what is known as the Brookdale Campus. Prior to the opening of City College's new "Towers," the Brookdale complex also housed the City University's only dormitory facility, which is home to over 600 undergraduate and graduate students. It also provides limited housing to nurses employed at Bellevue Hospital. The City College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as City College of New York or simply City College, CCNY, or colloquially as City)[1] is a senior college of the City University of New York, in New York City. ...


The School of Social Work is located on East 79th Street at Lexington Avenue. The Social Work campus is served by the No. 6 line of the New York City Subway (77th Street station). The 6 Lexington Avenue Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system operated by the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... 77th Street (also known as 77th Street–Lenox Hill Hospital) is a local station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ...


A college-affiliated shuttle bus service connects the 68th Street, health sciences, and social work campuses.


In addition, the college owns Roosevelt House, which will be used as a public policy academic center, located at 47-49 East 65th Street. The Department of Art also runs a campus at 450 West 41st Street, near Times Square, which houses the college's Masters of Fine Arts program. Times Square Times Square is the name given to a principal intersection at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...


Student media

Hunter College has a campus radio station, WHCS, which broadcasts at 590AM.[10] The Envoy is the main campus newspaper, published bi-weekly during the academic year. Other publications include the Olive Tree Review (literary), the WORD[11] (news), the Wistarion (yearbook), SABOR (Spanish language), Revista De La Academia (Spanish language), The Islamic Times, The Shield (African-American interest), Political Paradigm (political science), Psych News (psychology), Hakol (Jewish interest), and Spoof (humor).[12]


Notable alumni

Art

Jules de Balincourt (born 1972 in Paris) is a French painter. ... Ryan Ashley Humphrey (born July 24, 1979 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a professional basketball player in the NBA. After a career at the University of Notre Dame, he was a first round draft pick of the Utah Jazz in the 2002 NBA Draft. ... Look up bravo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Top Design is a reality television series airing on the Bravo network which features 12 aspiring interior designers to get cash and receive a spot in New Yorks Designer showcases. ... Terrance Lindall is an American artist who was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1944. ... Bronze Gate (2005) is a cor-ten steel work by Robert Morris. ...

Entertainment

Martina Arroyo is a great African-American soprano, best known for her performances of the Italian spinto repertoire. ... Ellen Rona Barkin (born April 16, 1954 in New York City) is a Jewish-American actress. ... Edward Burns Edward Burns Jr. ... Bobby Darin Bobby Darin (May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) (born Walden Robert Cassotto) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Ruby Dee (born October 27, 1924) is an African American actress, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and activist. ... Vin Diesel (born Mark Sinclair Vincent on July 18, 1967) is an American actor, writer, director, and producer. ... Judy Reyes (born November 5, 1968 in The Bronx, New York) is an American television and film actress. ... Hugh Malcolm Downs, (born February 14, 1921) is a retired American broadcaster, television host, producer, and author. ... Wilson Jermaine Heredia is an American actor of Dominican descent, best known for winning the 1996 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical for his portrayal of Angel Dumott Schunard in the musical Rent. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Richard Jeni is an American stand-up comedian. ... Julianne Nicholson (born July 1, 1971,Medford,Massachusetts) is an American actress. ... Law & Order: Criminal Intent is a United States crime drama television series that began in 2001. ... Dr. Antonia Pantoja (September 13, 1922-May 24, 2002), born in San Juan, Puerto Rico - educator, social worker, feminist, civil rights leader and founder of Aspira, the Puerto Rican Forum, Boricua College and Producir. ... Boricua College is a post-secondary educational institution located in New York City. ... Rhea Perlman at the 1988 Emmy Awards. ... Robert Smigel (born February 7, 1960) is an American humorist, animator and performer best known for his Saturday Night Live animations and as the puppeteer behind Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog. ... Jean Stapleton Jean Stapleton (born Jeanne Murray on January 19, 1923 in New York City) is an American actress of stage, television and film. ... Star & Buc Wild was a syndicated radio show which was broadcast out of WWPR-FM Power 105. ... Star & Buc Wild was a syndicated radio show which was broadcast out of WWPR-FM Power 105. ... Nick Valensi (born Nicholas Valensi, January 16, 1981, in New York) is a guitarist for the New York based rock band, The Strokes. ...

Government, politics, and social issues

Bella Abzug Bella Savitsky Abzug (July 24, 1920 – March 31, 1998) was a well-known Jewish American political figure and a leader of the womens movement. ... Image:Barron. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... Keiko Bonk was the first major office holder in the United States Green Party. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick (born 1942) is an associate judge on the New York Court of Appeals, the highest court in the state of New York. ... The Court of Appeals is New Yorks highest appellate court, created in 1847, replacing the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. ... Delegate Roger Manno at a Congressional event in Washington D.C. Roger Manno (b. ... Judge Larry Seidlin Larry Seidlin (born May 24, 1950 in The Bronx, New York to a Jewish-American family) is a State Court judge for the Circuit Court of the Seventeenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida in and for Broward County. ... Broward County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Vickie Lynn Marshall (November 28, 1967 – February 8, 2007), better known by her stage name Anna Nicole Smith,[1] was an American model, actress and celebrity who first gained popularity as Playboys 1993 Playmate of the Year. ... Donna Esther Shalala (surname pronounced ; born February 14, 1941) is the current president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... John F. Timoney (born c. ... Chief of Police is the title typically given to the head of a police department, particularly in the United States and Canada. ... Miami redirects here. ... Radford University is a public, state-funded, comprehensive university, located in the City of Radford, in Southwestern Virginia. ... Counterpunch can refer to: In traditional typography, a counterpunch is a type of punch used to create the negative space in or around a character. ...

Literature

Maurice Berger cultural historian, curator, and art critic. ... Colin Channer is a Jamaican writer, often referred to as “Bob Marley with a pen,” due to the spiritual, sensual, social themes presented from a literary Jamaican perspective. ... Ada Louise Rene (Landman) Huxtable (b. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Audre Geraldine Lorde (February 18, 1934 in Harlem, New York City - November 17, 1992) was a writer and an activist. ... Sylvia Field Porter (18 June 1913 - 5 June 1991) was an American economist and journalist. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest[] newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Sonia Sanchez is an African American poet most often associated with the Black Arts Movement. ... Ned Vizzini, birth name Edison Vizzini, (b. ...

Science and technology

Gertrude B. Elion (January 23, 1918 - February 21, 1999) was an American biochemist and pharmacologist, and a 1988 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion because: it contains no encyclopedic content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (born on July 19, 1921) is an American medical physicist, and a co-winner of the 1977 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her development of the radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique. ...

Trivia

  • The motto of Hunter College is "mihi cura futuri," meaning "the care of the future is mine." This was taken from book XIII of Ovid's Metamorphoses.
  • Three female Hunter College students are known to have posed for Playboy magazine.[13]
  • The black sculpture in front of the West Building is called Tau, by Tony Smith, who taught at the college from 1962-1980.
  • Leonard Peikoff, Ayn Rand's intellectual heir and founder of the Ayn Rand Institute, taught philosophy at Hunter College for approximately ten years.
  • Blake Schwarzenbach, singer/guitarist of Jawbreaker and Jets To Brazil, currently teaches creative writing classes at Hunter.
  • A scene for the 2004 film The Interpreter was filmed at the Brookdale Campus.[14]
  • The comic A Couple of Guys features a character, Hector Velasquez, who is a fictional student of Hunter College.
  • Jill Mathews was featured in Shadow Boxers a documentary about Professional Female Boxing. Mathews has a degree in nutrition from Hunter College.
  • In the movie The Fisher King the character portrayed by Robin Williams was a History professor at Hunter prior to the tragic event he experienced

Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now ConstanÅ£a AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... The first issue of Playboy. ... Tony Smith (September 23, 1912 – December 26, 1980) was an American sculptor, visual artist, and a noted theorist on art. ... Leonard Peikoff circa 1970 Leonard Peikoff (born 1933) is an Objectivist philosopher and author. ... It has been suggested that The Ayn Rand Collective be merged into this article or section. ... The Ayn Rand Institute: The Center for the Advancement of Objectivism (ARI) was established in 1985, three years after Ayn Rands death, by Leonard Peikoff, Rands legal and intellectual heir. ... Alexander Blake Schwarzenbach is an American musician, born on May 20, 1967. ... Jawbreaker can refer to the following: A hard, usually round, candy that one sucks on. ... Jets to Brazil is an American rock band. ... The Interpreter is a 2005 drama/thriller film, directed by Sydney Pollack and starring Nicole Kidman, Sean Penn, and Catherine Keener. ... A Couple of Guys is the name of a comic strip about the lives of a gay male couple, their friends and family in New York City. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... History studies the past in human terms. ...

References

  1. ^ Office of the Hunter College Senate, Report of the Senate Select Committee on Academic Freedom, Feb. 1, 2006.
  2. ^ PSC-CUNY, HUNTER COLLEGE ACADEMIC FREEDOM SURVEY
  3. ^ A Scam in the Works?, The Word, Apr. 2, 2006.
  4. ^ Manhattan/Hunter College High School for Science at InsideSchools.org.
  5. ^ Axelia Inc. Study #559821
  6. ^ Axelia Inc. Study #559821
  7. ^ Axelia Inc. Study #559821
  8. ^ www.hunter.cuny.edu
  9. ^ See the "Save JREC" website and Hunter-L (college listserv) postings by Prof. Claus Mueller and Prof. Roger Persell for more information.
  10. ^ WHCS radio
  11. ^ The WORD
  12. ^ Student Activities: Media
  13. ^ See Playboy's College Girls 1996, Playboy's College Girls 1997, and Sophia (Sophia Arden) on Yahoo! Groups.
  14. ^ Campuses Open Their Doors for Film Shoots, Gaining Revenue for Programs and Exposure, CUNY Matters, Summer 2006.

Yahoo! Groups Yahoo! Groups is a service from Yahoo! that provides electronic mailing lists. ...

External links

  • Hunter College
  • From the Free Academy to Cuny: Illustrating Public Higher Education in New York City, 1847-1997, by Sandra S. Roff, et al.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hunter College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1122 words)
Hunter, apart from being the largest of the CUNY colleges, is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States.
The college reacted by establishing branches in the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island.
Hunter College is anchored by its main campus at East 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, a modern complex of three towers -the East, West and North buildings and Thomas Hunter Hall, all of which are interconnected by skywalks.
Hunter College High School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2564 words)
Hunter is administered by Hunter College, a division of CUNY, rather than the NYC Department of Education; there is no tuition fee and it is publicly funded.
Hunter along with the Original Townsend Harris High School in (City College) were lab schools, established to assist in preparing admission to their respective schools.
The prototypical Hunter girl was the subject of a song entitled "Sarah Maria Jones," who, the lyrics told, had "Hunter in her bones." The school became co-ed in 1974 as a result of a lawsuit by Hunter College Elementary School parents.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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