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Encyclopedia > Hunstanton

Hunstanton is a large seaside town in Norfolk, England, facing The Wash. The classification of Hunstanton as "east coast" makes the town unique in that it is the only east coast seaside resort in England where the sun can be seen to set over the sea. Hunstanton is also well known for its stratified, fossiliferous cliffs: lower reddish sandstone is topped by a white chalk.


The town is of prehistoric origin. In 1970, evidence of neolithic settlement was found.


In 1846, Henry Styleman Le Strange, a local landowner, decided that he'd like to turn Hunstanton into a holiday resort. Many new buildings were built, mostly in warm Norfolk carrstone. Following the death of Henry Le Strange, the project was successfully continued by his son. Hunstanton today is home to a fairground, aquarium and seal sanctuary, leisure pool, theatre, large caravan parks with amenities (Searle's Holiday Park opened in 1936), a number of amusement arcades, and a long promenade. In good weather, boats run by Searle's carry tourists out to view grey seals which have colonised sand bars both in The Wash and to the north of Norfolk. The centrepiece of the town is a large sloping green, which runs from one end of the high street to the promenade. Until gutted by fire in 1972, a pier also connected to the green.


The original, pre-Le Strange settlement of Hunstanton is now known as Old Hunstanton, adjoining the north of the larger resort. The quiet character of Old Hunstanton remains distinct from and complements that of its busy sibling, with clifftop walks past a disused lighthouse and the ruins of St. Edmund's Chapel, built in 1272.


Although summer crowds tend to flock to Hunstanton in smaller numbers now than are evidenced in 1980s' postcards of the promenade and beach, the popularity of the town as a tourist destination for day-trippers and holidaymakers has nevertheless endured, weathering the decline of the British seaside resort. Indeed, during the 1990s, businesses in villages south of Hunstanton (Dersingham, Ingoldisthorpe and Snettisham) complained of a loss in trade after being bypassed by the A149, which carries heavy Hunstanton-bound traffic; while in 2004, the Hunstanton lifeboats were the busiest in Norfolk [1] (http://new.edp24.co.uk/search/story.aspx?brand=EDPOnline&category=News&itemid=NOED09%20Jan%202005%2020:00:19:443&tBrand=EDPOnline&tCategory=search&archive=0).


The countryside surrounding Hunstanton is hillier than most of Norfolk, and as sparsely populated, the only nearby large settlement being King's Lynn, 12 miles to the south. The catchment area of Hunstanton's day-trippers includes the remote Fenland of South-West Norfolk, South Lincolnshire and North Cambridgeshire, and the Midlands beyond it. Holidaymakers are attracted by nearby Sandringham (the Queen's winter residence), Castle Rising, the Burnhams (birthplace of Lord Nelson) and the RSPB reserves at nearby Titchwell.


In 1910, a book "The Rocks of Hunstanton and its Neigbourhood" by J.F. Jackson was published by The Premier Press.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Details for self catering holiday cottage - Old Hunstanton - The Old Lighthouse (224 words)
Hunstanton is a popular traditional seaside town, with a long Blue Flag sandy beach backed by distinctive striped cliffs.
Hunstanton town offers a host of activities for the family including the Sea Life Centre, a fun fair, tennis courts, bowling green and a sports and leisure centre with indoor swimming pool.
A little further along is quieter Old Hunstanton, which is a picturesque village with mellow carrstone houses and an impressive medieval church, two cliff-top pitch and putt courses and a championship golf course.
Hunstanton at AllExperts (608 words)
Hunstanton is also well known for its stratified, fossiliferous cliffs: lower reddish sandstone is topped by a white chalk.
Hunstanton today is home to a fairground, aquarium and seal sanctuary, leisure pool, theatre, large caravan parks with amenities (Searle's Holiday Park opened in 1936), a number of amusement arcades, and a long promenade.
Although summer crowds tend to flock to Hunstanton in smaller numbers now than are evidenced in 1980s postcards of the promenade and beach, the popularity of the town as a tourist destination for day-trippers and holidaymakers has nevertheless endured, weathering the decline of the British seaside resort.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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