FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hungarian Soviet Republic
Magyarországi Tanácsköztársaság
Hungarian Soviet Republic

1919

Flag of Hungary Capital Budapest Language(s) Hungarian Government Republic Prime Minister  - 1918 – 1919 Mihály Károlyi President  - 1919 Mihály Károlyi History  - Established November 16, 1918  - Downfall March 21, 1919 Hungarian Democratic Republic was an independent republic proclaimed after the collapse of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy in 1918. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary_1940. ... Map of Hungary before after the Vienna Awards and the invasion of Yugoslavia in World War II. Capital Budapest Language(s) Hungarian Religion Roman Catholic Government Constitutional monarchy King Vacant ¹ Regent Miklós Horthy Prime Minister  - 1920 Sándor Simonyi-Semadam (first)  - 1944 Géza Lakatos (last) Legislature National Assembly... Image File history File links Red_flag. ...


Flag Flag ratio: 1:2, basic flag Flag ratio 1:2, Hungarian flag with current official Hungarian coat of arms. ...

Capital Budapest
Language(s) Hungarian
Government Socialist republic
History
 - Established March 21, 1919
 - Downfall August 6, 1919

The Hungarian Soviet Republic (Hungarian: Magyarországi Tanácsköztársaság) was a Communist regime established in Hungary from March 21 until August 6, 1919, under the leadership of Béla Kun. It was the first Communist government to be formed in Europe after the October Revolution in Russia which brought the Bolsheviks to power in that country. Lasting only four months, the Soviet republic fell apart when Romanian forces occupied Budapest. The successor to the state was the Kingdom of Hungary formed after the Romanian army pulled out of Hungary. Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... The term socialist state (or socialist republic, or workers state) can carry one of several different (but related) meanings: Strictly speaking, any real or hypothetical state organized along the principles of socialism may be called a socialist state. ... The Establishment is a generalized, mostly negative term used in Western societies to refer to the controlling (elite) structures of those societies. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Downfall on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Operation Downfall: The Allied plan for the invasion of Japan at the end of World War II. Der Untergang: D/A 2004 film about the last days of Adolf Hitler - shown in English-speaking countries as Downfall. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Béla Kun Béla Kun (born Béla Kohn) (February 20, 1886, in Szilágycseh, today Cehu Silvaniei, Transylvania, Romania, died August 29, 1938 in the Soviet Union) was a Hungarian Communist politician, who ruled Hungary for a brief period in 1919. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... Bolshevik Party Meeting. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Map of the Kingdom of Hungary in 1920 and in 1941(green). ...

Contents

Birth of the Soviet Republic

The immediate cause of the formation of the Hungarian Soviet Republic was the failure of Count Mihály Károlyi's government of the re-born state of Hungary to organize the country's social and economic life after the lost war and the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After less than six months in power, Károlyi was dismissed by a coalition of Social Democrats and Communists. Count Mihály Adam Georg Nikolaus Károlyi von Nagykárolyi (March 4, 1875-March 20, 1955) was briefly Hungarys leader in 1918-19 during an ill-fated spell of democracy. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... MKP symbol The Hungarian Communist Party (in Hungarian: Magyar Kommunista Párt or Kommunisták Magyarországi Pártja) was founded on November 24, 1918, and was in power in Hungary briefly from March to August 1919 under Béla Kun and the Hungarian Soviet Republic. ...


The Hungarian Communist Party was very small at this time, but its members were very active and it grew rapidly. An initial nucleus of the party had been organized just a few months earlier, in a Moscow hotel on November 4, 1918; when a group of Hungarian prisoners of war and some other Communist sympathizers formed a Central Committee. Led by Béla Kun, they soon left for Hungary and started to recruit new members and propagate the party's ideas, radicalizing many of the Social Democrats in the process. By February 1919, the party numbered 30,000 to 40,000 members, including many unemployed ex-soldiers, young intellectuals and ethnic minorities. For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Béla Kun Béla Kun (born Béla Kohn) (February 20, 1886, in Szilágycseh, today Cehu Silvaniei, Transylvania, Romania, died August 29, 1938 in the Soviet Union) was a Hungarian Communist politician, who ruled Hungary for a brief period in 1919. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

History of Hungary
Flag of Hungary
Ancient Hungary
Pannonia
Hungary before the Magyars
The Middle Ages
Kingdom of Hungary in the Middle Ages
Modern Hungary
Ottoman Hungary
Principality of Transylvania
Royal Hungary
1700 to 1919
1848 Revolution
Austria-Hungary
Hungarian Soviet Republic
Between the Two World Wars
Second World War
Communist Hungary
People's Republic of Hungary
1956 Revolution
Other Topics
Military history of Hungary
History of the Székely people
History of the Jews in Hungary
Music history of Hungary
History of Transylvania
This box: view  talk  edit

Kun founded a newspaper, called Vörös Újság ('Red News'), and concentrated on attacking Károlyi's government. During the following months, the power and influence of the Communist Party grew very quickly. Their supporters began to stage aggressive demonstrations against, among other things, hostile newspapers. In one crucial incident, a demonstration turned violent on February 20 and the protesters attacked the editorial office of the Social Democrats' official paper, called Népszava (People's Word). In the ensuing chaos, 7 people - including policemen - were killed. The government used this incident as a reason to arrest the leaders of the Hungarian Communist Party, ban Vörös Újság and close down the party's buildings. The arrests were particularly violent, with police officers openly beating the communists. This resulted in a wave of public sympathy for the Communist Party. On March 1, Vörös Újság was given permission to publish again, and the Communist Party's premises were re-opened. The leaders were permitted to receive guests in their prison, which allowed them to keep up with political affairs. See also the history of Europe, the history of present-day nations and states, Hungary before the Magyars, and Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... This article discusses the known pre-history and early history of the area corresponding to modern day Hungary, and the peoples associated with this area. ... This article deals with the history of the Kingdom of Hungary from the 10th century to c. ... Ottoman Hungary or Muslim Hungary refers to the Turkish-Ottoman age of todays Hungary (1526 - 1699). ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or Transilvania; Hungarian: ; German: ; Serbian: or Erdelj / Ердељ) is a historical region in the center of Romania. ... Consequences of the Battle of Mohács, and the conquest of Buda in 1541 by the Ottomans: the Kingdom is partitioned. ... This article describes the history of the Kingdom of Hungary between the 18th century and the early 20th century (1699 - 1919). ... The Hungarian Revolution of 1848 was one of many revolutions that year and closely linked to other revolutions of 1848 in the Habsburg areas. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... This article deals with the history of Hungary from March 1919 to May 1945. ... // In Hungary, the Great Depression induced a drop in the standard of living and the political mood of the country shifted further toward the right. ... The Peoples Republic of Hungary was the name used by Hungary from 1949 to 1989 during its Communist period. ... Combatants Soviet Union; ÁVH (Hungarian State Security Police) Ad hoc local Hungarian militias Commanders Ivan Konev Various independent militia leaders Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks Unknown number of militia and rebelling soldiers Casualties 722 killed, 1,251 wounded[1] 2,500 killed 13,000 wounded[2] The Hungarian... The military history of Hungary includes battles fought in the Carpathian Basin, nations occupying Hungary, and the military history of the Hungarian people regardless of geography. ... // At the end of the 13th century, in a chronicle called Gesta Hungarorum, the notary of Hungarian King Béla explained his beliefs about the conquest of Hungary about 280 years earlier. ... History of the Jews in Hungary concerns the Jews of Hungary and of Hungarian origins. ... // Middle Ages Little is known about Hungarian music prior to the 11th century, when the first Kings of Hungary were Christianized and Gregorian chant was introduced. ... This is an article about the history of Transylvania // Ancient History: Transylvania as the heartland of the Dacian state Dacian Kingdom, during the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Herodotus gives an account of the Agathyrsi, who lived in Transylvania during the 5th century BC. A kingdom of Dacia was in... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


After receiving the Vix Ultimatum or Vyx Note (demanding more territorial concessions) on March 20, Károlyi announced that the Dénes Berinkey government would resign. On March 21 he informed the Council of Ministers that only the Social Democrats could form a new government, as they were the party with the highest public support. In order to form a governing coalition, the Social Democrats started negotiations with the Communist leaders - who were still imprisoned - and decided to merge their two parties under the name of Hungarian Socialist Party. President Károlyi, who was an outspoken anti-Communist, was not informed about this fusion. Thus, while believing to have appointed a Socialist government, he found himself faced with one dominated by Communists. is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dénes Berinkey (1871-1948) was a Hungarian politician who served as prime minister in the regime of Mihály Károlyi for two months in 1919. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Social Democrats were not overjoyed about war with the Triple Entente, but saw no choice and allied Hungary with Soviet Russia. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Communist policies

Leaders of the Hungarian Soviet Republic. Tibor Szamuely, Béla Kun, Jenő Landler. Monument in Budapest.
Leaders of the Hungarian Soviet Republic. Tibor Szamuely, Béla Kun, Jenő Landler. Monument in Budapest.

Following the model laid out by Lenin, the newly united Socialist Party created a government called the Revolutionary Governing Council, which proclaimed the Hungarian Soviet Republic and dismissed President Károlyi on March 21. Initially, this government consisted of a Socialist-Communist coalition led by Sándor Garbai, but Kun, as Commissar of Foreign Affairs (foreign minister) was the real power in the country. Under Kun, the Communists leaped into action and managed to dismiss the Social Democratic ministers within days. Afterwards, the new Communist government decreed the abolition of aristocratic titles and privileges, the separation of church and state, and they codified the freedom of speech and assembly, free education, language and cultural rights to minorities (the latter four ideals were not implemented in practice). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (1054 × 698 pixel, file size: 151 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tibor Szamuely, Béla Kun, JenÅ‘ Landler. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (1054 × 698 pixel, file size: 151 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tibor Szamuely, Béla Kun, JenÅ‘ Landler. ... Tibor Szamuely Tibor Szamuely (1890 – 1919) was a Hungarian Communist leader. ... Béla Kun Béla Kun (born Béla Kohn) (February 20, 1886, in Szilágycseh, today Cehu Silvaniei, Transylvania, Romania, died August 29, 1938 in the Soviet Union) was a Hungarian Communist politician, who ruled Hungary for a brief period in 1919. ... JenÅ‘ Landler JenÅ‘ Landler (1875 – 1928) was a Hungarian Communist leader. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sándor Garbai (1879-1947) was a Hungarian socialist politician. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a governmental cabinet minister who helps form the foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... The separation of church and state is a concept in law whereby the structures of state or national government are kept separate from those of religious institutions. ... Freedom of speech is the concept of being able to speak freely without censorship. ... Group of women holding placards with political activist slogans: know your courts - study your politicians, Liberty in law, Law makers must not be law breakers, and character in candidates photo 1920 Freedom of assembly is the freedom to associate with, or organize any groups, gatherings, clubs, or organizations that one...


The Communist government also nationalized industrial and commercial enterprises, and socialized housing, transport, banking, medicine, cultural institutions, and all landholdings of more than 40 hectares. The public support for Communists was also heavily dependent on their promise of restoring Hungary's borders. A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ...


In a radio dispatch to the Russian SFSR, Kun informed Lenin that a "dictatorship of the proletariat" had been established in Hungary and asked for a treaty of alliance with the Russian SFSR, to defend against the inevitable hostile reaction from the Entente. The Russian SFSR was willing, but unable to lend a helping hand to the fledgling Hungarian Soviet Republic, because it was itself tied down in the Russian Civil War. The Hungarian government was thus left on its own, and a Red Guard was established under the command of Mátyás Rákosi. In addition, a group of 200 armed men - known as the Lenin Boys - formed a mobile detachment under the leadership of Cserny József. This detachment was deployed at various locations around the country where counter-revolutionary movements were suspected to operate. The Lenin Boys, as well as other similar groups and agitators killed and terrorised many people (for example, they blasphemed openly, or armed with hand grenades and using their rifles' butts, disbanded religious ceremonies)[1], even when they traveled to areas of the countryside that were traditionally conservative and highly religious. They executed a lot of people without trial[2]. This caused a number of conflicts with the local population, some of which turned violent. State motto: Russian: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! Translation: Workers of the world, unite! Capital Moscow Official language Russian Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until November 7, 1917 November 7, 1917 December 12, 1991 (dissolution) Area  - Total  - Water (%) Ranked 1st in the USSR 17,075,200 km² 13% Population  - Total   - Density Ranked 1st in the... The dictatorship of the proletariat is a term employed by Karl Marx in his 1875 Critique of the Gotha Program that refers to a transition period between capitalist and communist society in which the state can be nothing but the revolutionary dictatorship of the proletariat. The term refers to a... The Russian Civil War (1917-1922) began immediately after the collapse of the Russian provisional government and the Bolshevik takeover of Petrograd, rapidly intensifying after the dissolution of the Russian Constituent Assembly and signing of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. ... Portrait of Mátyás Rákosi Mátyás Rákosi (born March 14, 1892 as Mátyás Rosenfeld –February 5, 1971) was a Hungarian politician and the leader of Hungary from 1945 to 1956 through his post as General Secretary of the Hungarian Communist Party. ... The Lenin Boys were a Communist group formed in the Hungarian Soviet Republic in 1919. ... A counterrevolutionary is anyone who opposes a revolution, particularly those who act after a revolution to try to overturn or reverse it, in full or in part. ... The Red Terror was a campaign of mass arrests and deportations targeted against counterrevolutionaries in Russia during the Russian Civil War. ... Look up blasphemy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Foreign policy

The Hungarian Soviet Republic, in a dangerous strategic position next to hostile Romania and Czechoslovakia, was invaded by Romania in mid-April 1919. Some of Hungary's agricultural lands were seized, and the Romanian army threatened Budapest. Outvoting the Social Democrats, the Communists decided to keep fighting, using the Red Guard volunteers to stop the Romanian advance and seize a significant portion of Czechoslovakia. The Hungarian Soviet sought to cut open a corridor through Czechoslovakia to the RSFSR. This however worsened the Entente's view of the Communists. On June 8 American President Wilson demanded a halt to the Hungarian Red Army's advances and invited the Hungarian government to Paris to discuss Hungary's frontiers. Kun still hoped to link up with Russia and spearhead the worldwide workers' revolution in Southern Europe. A spurious Slovak Soviet Republic was proclaimed on June 16, in the southern and eastern Slovakia. Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... State motto: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Workers of the world, unite!) Official language None (Russian in practice) Capital Moscow Chairman of the Supreme... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... World revolution is a Marxist concept of a violent overthrow of capitalism that would take place in all countries, although not necessarily simultaneously. ... The Slovak Soviet Republic The Slovak Soviet Republic (in Slovak: Slovenská republika rád = literally: Slovak Republic of Councils - it was before the Russian word soviet (council) became widespread in Slovak and other languages) was a short lived communist state in south and eastern Slovakia from 16 June to 7... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Downfall

József Pogány speaks to revolutionary soldiers.
József Pogány speaks to revolutionary soldiers.

The situation of the Hungarian Communists began to deteriorate when, after a failed coup by the Social Democrats on June 24, the new Communist government of Antal Dovcsák resorted to large-scale reprisals. Revolutionary tribunals ordered 590 executions of people who were suspected of having been involved in the attempted coup. This became known as the "Red Terror", and greatly reduced domestic support for the government. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pogány in the revolution 1919 John Pepper, real name József Pogány, also known as Joseph, (1886 - 1937) was a Hungarian Jewish-born Communist active in the United States. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Antal Dovcsák (1879-1962) was a Hungarian politician who served as prime minister of the Hungarian Soviet Republic during July 1919. ... The Red Terror was a campaign of mass arrests and deportations targeted against counterrevolutionaries in Russia during the Russian Civil War. ...


The Hungarian Soviet found it increasingly difficult to fight two enemies at once with the small volunteer force, and support for both the war and the Communist Party were waning at home, partly due to the most dedicated Communists having gone and volunteered for combat. Kun's government accepted an Entente offer granting Romanian withdrawal from Hungary for Hungarian withdrawal from Czechoslovakia. Soviet Slovakia was abandoned to the Czechoslovak army at the end of June. Instead of withdrawing, Romania fought on and attacked Budapest. The Entente were eventually successful, and Béla Kun fled to Austria on August 1 together with other high-ranking Communists with only a minority remaining in Budapest, including György Lukács, the former Commissar for Culture and noted Marxist philosopher, to organise an underground Communist Party. The Budapest Workers' Soviet elected a new government, headed by Gyula Peidl, which only lasted a few days before the Romanian forces entered Budapest on August 6, putting an end to the Hungarian Soviet Republic. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Georg Lukács (April 13, 1885 – June 4, 1971) was a Hungarian Marxist philosopher and literary critic in the tradition of Western Marxism. ... Gyula Peidl (1873-1943) was a Hungarian socialist politician who served briefly as last prime minister and acting head of state of the Hungarian Soviet Republic in 1919. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the power vacuum created by the fall of the Soviet Republic and the Romanian occupation, the Conservative forces of István Bethlen and Miklós Horthy gradually took control of Western Hungary (which was outside the Romanian occupation zone). Semiregular detachments (formally commanded by Horthy, but mostly independent in practice) initiated a campaign of violence against Communists, leftists and Jews, known as the White Terror[1]. Many supporters of the Hungarian Soviet Republic were executed without trial, others (e.g. Ágoston Péter, Bajáki Ferenc, Bokányi Dezső, Dovcsák Antal, Haubrich József, Kalmár Henrik, Kelen József, Nyisztor György, Szabados Sándor, Vántus Károly) were imprisoned by trial ("comissar suits"). Most of them were later released to the Soviet Union by amnesty during the reign of Horthy, after a prisoner exchange agreement between Hungary and the Russian Soviet government in 1921. In all, about 415 prisoners were released as a result of this agreement. [2] Count István Bethlen Count István Bethlen de Bethlen (October 8, 1874 - October 5, 1946?), was a Hungarian aristocrat and statesman and served as Prime Minister from 1921 to 1931. ... “Horthy” redirects here. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that The White Terror (France) be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


See also

Tibor Szamuely Tibor Szamuely (1890 – 1919) was a Hungarian Communist leader. ... Woodrow Wilson and the American peace commissioners during the negotiations on the Treaty of Versailles. ... The Revolutions of 1917-23 formed a revolutionary wave precipitated by the Russian Revolutions of 1917 and the end of World War I. Some authorities date the wave as ending in 1919 or 1921. ... Combatants Soviet Union; ÁVH (Hungarian State Security Police) Ad hoc local Hungarian militias Commanders Ivan Konev Various independent militia leaders Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks Unknown number of militia and rebelling soldiers Casualties 722 killed, 1,251 wounded[1] 2,500 killed 13,000 wounded[2] The Hungarian... The Red Terror was a campaign of mass arrests and deportations targeted against counterrevolutionaries in Russia during the Russian Civil War. ...

References

  1. ^ János Kodolányi: Süllyedő világ; 1944.
  2. ^ See resources in the article Red Terror.
  • Borsanyi, Gyorgy The life of a Communist revolutionary, Bela Kun translated by Mario Fenyo, Boulder, Colorado : Social Science Monographs ; New York: Distributed by Columbia University Press, 1993.
  • Janos, Andrew C. & Slottman, William (editors) Revolution in perspective : essays on the Hungarian Soviet Republic of 1919: Published for the University of California, Berkeley, Center for Slavic and East European Studies, Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1971
  • Menczer, Bela "Bela Kun and the Hungarian Revolution of 1919" pages 299-309 Volume XIX, Issue #5, May 1969, History Today History Today Inc: London, United Kingdom.
  • Pastor, Peter, Hungary between Wilson and Lenin : the Hungarian revolution of 1918-1919 and the Big Three, Boulder, Colorado: East European Quarterly ; New York : distributed by Columbia University Press, 1976
  • Szilassy, Sándor Revolutionary Hungary, 1918-1921, Astor Park. Florida, Danubian Press 1971.
  • Tokes, Rudolf Béla Kun and the Hungarian Soviet Republic : the origins and role of the Communist Party of Hungary in the revolutions of 1918-1919 New York : published for the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, Stanford, California, by F.A. Praeger, 1967.
  • Volgyes, Ivan (editor) Hungary in revolution, 1918-19 : nine essays Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 1971

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hungarian Soviet Republic Information (1503 words)
The Hungarian Soviet Republic was the political regime in Hungary from March 21, 1919 until the beginning of August of the same year.
The immediate cause of the formation of the Hungarian Soviet Republic was the failure of Count Mihály Károlyi's government of the re-born state of Hungary to reorganize the country's social and economic life on the shambles left over after the lost war and the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
A spurious Slovak Soviet Republic was proclaimed on June 16, in the southern and eastern Slovakia.
Hungarian Soviet Republic - Definition, explanation (1074 words)
The Hungarian Soviet Republic was the political regime in Hungary from March 21, 1919 until the beginning of August of the same year, and it is the second Communist (or soviet) government in world history, after the one in Russia (1917).
In a radio dispatch to Soviet Russia, Kun informed Lenin that a "dictatorship of the proletariat" had been established in Hungary and asked for a treaty of alliance with Soviet Russia, to defend against the inevitable hostile reaction from the Entente.
Soviet Russia was willing, but unable to lend a helping hand to the fledgling Hungarian republic, because it was itself tied down in the Russian Civil War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m