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Encyclopedia > Hundred (division)

A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. The name is derived from the number one hundred and it may once have referred to a hundred men under arms. It was a traditional Germanic system described as early as AD 98 by Tacitus (the centeni). Europe forms the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... While the states marked in red show the core of New England, the regions cultural influence may cover a greater or lesser area than shown. ... 100 (the Roman numeral is C for centum) is the natural number following 99 and preceding 101. ... Events Roman emperor Nerva succeeded by Trajan Tacitus finished his Germania (approximate date) Births Deaths January 27: Nerva, Roman emperor Apollonius of Tyana, Greek/Roman philosopher and mathematician (b. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (ca. ...


Similar systems were used in the traditional administrative regimes of China and Japan.


England

In England a hundred was the division of a shire for administrative, military and judicial purposes under the common law. Originally, when introduced by the Saxons between 613 and 1017, a hundred had enough land to sustain approximately one hundred households headed by a hundred-man or hundred eolder. He was responsible for administration, justice, and supplying military troops, as well as leading its forces. The office was not hereditary, but by the 10th century the office was selected from among a few outstanding families. Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... For information on the fictional Shire of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, see Shire (Middle-earth) A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Saxons, a Germanic people. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Events Canute the Great is acclaimed king of England. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...

Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century.
Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century.

Hundreds were further divided into tithings, which contained ten households. Below that, the basic unit of land was called the hide, which was enough land to support one family and varied in size from 60 to 120 old acres, or 15 to 30 modern acres (60,000 to 120,000m²) depending on the quality and fertility of the land. Compare with township. Above the hundred was the shire under the control of a shire-reeve (or sheriff). Hundreds remained in existence into at least the late 19th century. Image File history File links Kernow_Hundreds. ... Image File history File links Kernow_Hundreds. ... Motto: Onan hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Cornwall, England Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Area - Total - Admin. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The hide was a variable unit of land area used in medieval England, defined according to its arable yield and taxable potential rather than its exact dimensions. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... Fertility is the ability of people or animals to produce healthy offspring in abundance. ... The term township generally means the district or area associated with a town. ... For information on the fictional Shire of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, see Shire (Middle-earth) A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain. ... In England, a reeve was an official appointed to supervise lands for a lord. ... Sheriff is both a political and a legal office held under English common law, Scots law or U.S. common law, or the person who holds such office. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The number of hundreds in each county varied wildly. Leicestershire had six, whereas Devon, nearly three times larger, had thirty-two. Several ancient hundred names give their name to modern local government districts. Leicestershire (abbreviated Leics) is a landlocked county in central England. ... The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... The Districts of England are the lowest level of local government in England, except for civil parishes. ...


Wapentake

A wapentake is a term derived from the Old Norse, the rough equivalent of an Anglo-Saxon hundred. The word denotes an administrative meeting place, typically a crossroads or a ford in a river where attendance or voting would be denoted or conducted by the show of weapons. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ...


The counties of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland and Lincolnshire were divided into wapentakes, just as most of the remainder of England was divided into hundreds. In some counties, such as Leicestershire, the wapentakes recorded at the time of the Domesday Book evolved into hundreds later on. In others, such as Lincolnshire, the term remained in use In the Scandinavian countries hundreds were used in Sweden (with Finland), Norway and Denmark. The White Yorkshire rose. ... Derbyshire (pronounced Dar-bee-shur) is a county in the East Midlands of England, which boasts some of Englands most attractive scenery. ... Leicestershire (abbreviated Leics) is a landlocked county in central England. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The domesday book was conducted in 1085 and was completed in 1086 which meant that it took William the Conquer 1 year to complete. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Scandinavia, Fennoscandia, and the Kola Peninsula. ...


In older Sweden (Svealand), the division was called Hundare, whereas in Götaland (Geatland), Denmark and Norway it was called herred and härad. Eventually that division was superseded by introducing the härad also in Svealand. Svealand or Sweden Proper[1] is a historical region of Sweden. ... Götaland, Gothia, Gothland [1], Gotland (AHD), Gautland or Geatland, is a historical land of Sweden, and was once divided into petty kingdoms. ...


Hundreds were not organized in Norrland, i.e. the northern sparsely populated part of Sweden. It is possible that hundreds were organised in Finland even in pre-Christian times (i.e. before annexation by Sweden. Norrland is a historical land of Sweden. ...


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Laws, Acts, and Legislation (4371 words)
Of the fine imposed pursuant to this division, twenty-five dollars shall be paid to an enforcement and education fund established by the legislative authority of the law enforcement agency in this state that primarily was responsible for the arrest of the offender, as determined by the court that imposes the fine.
Of the fine imposed pursuant to this division, one hundred twenty-three dollars shall be paid to an enforcement and education fund established by the legislative authority of the law enforcement agency in this state that primarily was responsible for the arrest of the offender, as determined by the court that imposes the fine.
Of the fine imposed pursuant to this division, two hundred ten dollars shall be paid to an enforcement and education fund established by the legislative authority of the law enforcement agency in this state that primarily was responsible for the arrest of the offender, as determined by the court that imposes the fine.
hundred (1476 words)
It is sometimes stated that the hundred is a primitive subdivision consisting a a hundred hides of land, or apportioned to a hundred families: the great objection to which is the impossibility of reconciling the historical hundreds with any such computation.
Upon this theory the 'hundred' was originally the association of a hundred persons for the conservation of peace and execution of law, parallel with the later institution of the tithing or association of ten freemen for a similar purpose.
The hundred was also used as a division of the county in some of the English colonies in North America: Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Maine.
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