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Encyclopedia > Humerus
Humerus l. dx. - ant. view
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The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the shoulder to the elbow. On a skeleton, it fits between the scapula and the radius and ulna. Download high resolution version (400x1793, 139 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (400x1793, 139 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (400x1745, 133 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (400x1745, 133 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... ARM may stand for: Most likely: ARM Ltd (originally Advanced RISC Machines) ARM architecture CPU design or one of its derivatives developed by ARM Ltd (originally called The Acorn RISC Machine) Adjustable rate mortgage Annotated Reference Manual (C++) Artificial rupture of membranes (see amniotic sac) the ISO 3166-1 3... The human upper arm Grays Fig. ... Elbow redirects here. ... In biology, the skeleton or skeletal system is the biological system providing support in living organisms. ... Left scapula - front view () Left scapula - rear view () In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ... The radius and ulna of the left forearm, posterior surface. ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ...

Contents


Articulations

The head of the humerus (caput humeri) articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula at the glenohumeral joint. Also known as the "shoulder joint," it is a ball-and-socket joint, which allows a wide range of movement. This joint has two bursae: the subacromial bursa and the subscapular bursa. The subacromial bursa separates the tendon of the supraspinatus muscle from the deltoid muscle. The subscapular bursa separates the scapular fossa from the tendon of the subscapularis muscle. The glenohumeral joint is stabilized by the rotator cuff muscles and the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle. Left scapula - front view () Left scapula - rear view () In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ... ... A joint is a nicely rolled marijuana cigarette. ... Bursa (formerly known as Brusa or Prusa) is the capital of the Bursa Province in northwestern Turkey. ... // Supraspinatus muscle The supraspinatus is a relatively small muscle of the upper limb that takes its name from its origin from the supraspinous fossa superior to the spine of the scapula. ... The deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the human shoulder. ... The Subscapularis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone. ... In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle on the upper arm that acts to flex the elbow. ...


The distal end of the humerus (at the elbow) creates a hinge joint with the ulna, allowing only flexion and extension. This happens on the trochlea of the humerus. Two pits at this end of the humerus (the coronoid fossa and the olecranon fossa) allow the ulna room to move, but prevent it from over-flexing/extending.


There is also a pivot joint between the capitulum of the humerus, and the head of the radius. This allows the hand to pronate and supinate (turn to face downwards or upwards). The radius and ulna of the left forearm, posterior surface. ...


Muscle attachments

A variety of muscles attach to the humerus. These enable movement at the elbow and at the shoulder. A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. ...

The anconeus muscle is a small muscle on the posterior surface of the elbow. ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... Brachioradialis is a muscle located in the forearm, that acts to flex the elbow. ... The coracobrachialis is one of the three muscles that attach to the coracoid process of the scapula. ... The deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the human shoulder. ... The extensor carpi radialis brevis is specific human muscle. ... Extensor carpi radialis longus is one of the five main muscles that control movement at the wrist. ... Extensor carpi ulnaris is a muscle, located in the forearm of human bodies that acts to extend and adduct the wrist. ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... The Extensor digiti minimi muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Extensor digitorum muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... In anatomy, flexor carpi radialis is a muscle of the human forearm that acts to flex and abduct the hand. ... In anatomy, flexor carpi ulnaris muscle is a muscle of the human forearm that acts to flex and adduct the hand. ... Flexor digitorum superficialis is an extrinsic flexor muscle of the fingers. ... Tommy John surgery, known by doctors as ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (or UCL), is a surgical procedure in which a ligament in the elbow is replaced with a tendon or ligament from elsewhere in the body (often the forearm, hamstring or wrist). ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... Latissimus dorsi is a large flat muscle located on the back. ... The Palmaris longus muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... Grays Fig. ... The Pronator teres muscle is a muscle of the human body, in the forearm. ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... The Supinator muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... Teres major is a muscle of the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles. ...

Rotator Cuff Muscles

The rotator cuff muscles attach at the proximal humerus, and can rotate and abduct the arm at the shoulder. The Infraspinatus muscle is a lateral rotator of the glenohumeral joint. ... // Supraspinatus muscle The supraspinatus is a relatively small muscle of the upper limb that takes its name from its origin from the supraspinous fossa superior to the spine of the scapula. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Subscapularis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The rotator cuff is an anatomical term given to the group of muscles and their tendons that act to stabilize the shoulder. ...


Deltoid has a variety of actions on the top of the arm. Pectoralis major, teres major and latissimus dorsi, which all insert at the intertubercular groove of the humerus, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. Deltoid can refer to: deltoid muscle deltoid (curve) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Location The clavicular head of the pectoralis major takes its origin from the anterior surface of the medial half of the clavicle. ... Teres major is a muscle of the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles. ... Latissimus dorsi is a large flat muscle located on the back. ...


Biceps brachii, brachialis, coracobrachialis, and brachioradialis (which attaches very distally), act to flex the elbow. Biceps however does not attach to the humerus. A person flexing his biceps brachii In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle on the upper arm that acts to flex the elbow. ... Brachialis is a flexor muscle in the upper arm. ... Coracobrachialis is one of the three muscles that attach to the coracoid process of the scapula. ... Brachioradialis is a muscle located in the forearm, that acts to flex the forearm. ...


Triceps brachii and anconeus extend the elbow, and attach to the posterior side of the humerus. Triceps brachii The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans. ... The anconeus muscle is a small muscle on the posterior surface of the elbow. ...


Some of the forearm muscles, (such as pronator teres, and the flexors and extensors of the wrist) also attach to the distal humerus. The forearm is the structure on the upper limb, between the elbow and the wrist. ... The Pronator teres muscle is a muscle of the human body, in the forearm. ... A flexor muscle is a skeletal muscle whose contraction bends a joint, decreasing the angle between components of a limb, such as bending the knee or elbow. ... An extensor muscle is any skeletal muscle that opens a joint increasing the angle between components of a limb, such as straightening the knee or elbow and bending the wrist or spine. ...


Structure

Figure 1 : Left humerus. Anterior view.
Figure 1 : Left humerus. Anterior view.
Figure 2 : Left humerus. Posterior view.

The humerus (arm bone) is the longest and largest bone of the upper extremity; it is divisible into a body and two extremities. The extremities consist of cancellous tissue, covered with a thin, compact layer [Fig. 3]; the body is composed of a cylinder of compact tissue, thicker at the center than toward the extremities, and contains a large medullary canal which extends along its whole length. Download high resolution version (653x1235, 79 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ... Download high resolution version (653x1235, 79 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ... Download high resolution version (256x1000, 28 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ... Download high resolution version (256x1000, 28 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ...


Upper extremity

The upper extremity consists of a large rounded head joined to the body by a constricted portion called the neck, and two eminences, the greater and lesser tubercles.


Link title Part of the Style and how-to series Shortcut: WP:HEP See also Help:Editing, m:Help:Editing, m:Help:Starting_a_new_page Wikipedia is a WikiWiki, which means that anyone can easily edit any unprotected article and have those changes posted immediately to that page. ...


Headline text

Image:Example.jpg==== The head ==== ('caput humeri') The head, nearly hemispherical in form, 54 is directed upward, medialward, and a little backward, and articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula. The circumference of its articular surface is slightly constricted and is termed the anatomical neck, in contradistinction to a constriction below the tubercles called the surgical neck which is frequently the seat of fracture. Fracture of the anatomical neck rarely occurs. Image File history File links Example. ...


The Anatomical Neck (collum anatomicum) is obliquely directed, forming an obtuse angle with the body. It is best marked in the lower half of its circumference; in the upper half it is represented by a narrow groove separating the head from the tubercles. It affords attachment to the articular capsule of the shoulder-joint, and is perforated by numerous vascular foramina.


The anatomical neck

The anatomical neck of the humerus is an indentation distal to the head of the humerus on which the articular capsule attaches.


The greater tubercle

('tuberculum majus; greater tuberosity') The greater tubercle is situated lateral to the head and lesser tubercle, and just lateral to the anatomical neck. Its upper surface is rounded and marked by three flat impressions: the highest of these gives insertion to the supraspinatus muscle; the middle to the infraspinatus muscle; the lowest one, and the body of the bone for about 2.5 cm. below it, to the teres minor muscle. The lateral surface of the greater tubercle is convex, rough, and continuous with the lateral surface of the body. // Supraspinatus muscle The supraspinatus is a relatively small muscle of the upper limb that takes its name from its origin from the supraspinous fossa superior to the spine of the scapula. ... The Infraspinatus muscle is a lateral rotator of the glenohumeral joint. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The lesser tubercle

('tuberculum minus; lesser tuberosity') The lesser tubercle, although smaller, is more prominent than the greater: it is situated in front, and is directed medialward and forward. Above and in front it presents an impression for the insertion of the tendon of the subscapularis muscle. The Subscapularis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...


The intertubercular (bicipital) groove

The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the biceps brachii muscle and transmits a branch of the anterior humeral circumflex artery to the shoulder-joint. It runs obliquely downward, and ends near the junction of the upper with the middle third of the bone. In the fresh state its upper part is covered with a thin layer of cartilage, lined by a prolongation of the synovial membrane of the shoulder-joint; its lower portion gives insertion to the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. It is deep and narrow above, and becomes shallow and a little broader as it descends. Its lips are called, respectively, the crests of the greater and lesser tubercles (bicipital ridges), and form the upper parts of the anterior and medial borders of the body of the bone. In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle on the upper arm that acts to flex the elbow. ... The synovium or synovial membrane is a thin, weak layer of tissue which lines the non-cartilaginous surfaces within the joint space, sealing it from the surrounding tissue. ... Latissimus dorsi is a large flat muscle located on the back. ...


The surgical neck

The surgical neck is a narrow area distal to the tubercles that is a common site of fracture. It makes contact with the axillary nerve and the posterior humeral circumflex artery. The axillary nerve is a nerve of the human body, that comes off the posterior cord of the brachial plexus at the level of the axilla (armpit) and carriers nerve fibers from C5 and C6. ...


The body or shaft

('corpus humeri') The body is almost cylindrical in the upper half of its extent, prismatic and flattened below, and has three borders and three surfaces.


Borders

Figure 3 : Longitudinal section of head of left humerus.
Figure 3 : Longitudinal section of head of left humerus.

The anterior border runs from the front of the greater tubercle above to the coronoid fossa below, separating the antero-medial from the antero-lateral surface. Its upper part is a prominent ridge, the crest of the greater tubercle; it serves for the insertion of the tendon of the pectoralis major muscle. About its center it forms the anterior boundary of the deltoid tuberosity, on which the deltiod muscle attaches; below, it is smooth and rounded, affording attachment to the brachialis muscle. From Grays Anatomy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... From Grays Anatomy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Grays Fig. ... Brachialis is a flexor muscle in the upper arm. ...


The lateral border runs from the back part of the greater tubercle to the lateral epicondyle, and separates the anterolateral from the posterior surface. Its upper half is rounded and indistinctly marked, serving for the attachment of the lower part of the insertion of the teres minor muscle, and below this giving origin to the lateral head of the triceps brachii muscle; its center is traversed by a broad but shallow oblique depression, the spiral groove (musculospiral groove). The radial nerve runs in the spiral groove. Its lower part forms a prominent, rough margin, a little curved from behind forward, the lateral supracondylar ridge, which presents an anterior lip for the origin of the brachioradialis muscle above, and extensor carpi radialis longus muscle below, a posterior lip for the triceps brachii muscle, and an intermediate ridge for the attachment of the lateral intermuscular septum. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans. ... The radial nerve is a nerve in the human body, that supplies the arm, the forearm and the hand. ... Brachioradialis is a muscle located in the forearm, that acts to flex the elbow. ... Extensor carpi radialis longus is one of the five main muscles that control movement at the wrist. ... The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans. ...


The medial border extends from the lesser tubercle to the medial epicondyle. Its upper third consists of a prominent ridge, the crest of the lesser tubercle, which gives insertion to the tendon of the teres major muscle. About its center is a slight impression for the insertion of the coracobrachialis muscle, and just below this is the entrance of the nutrient canal, directed downward; sometimes there is a second nutrient canal at the commencement of the radial sulcus. The inferior third of this border is raised into a slight ridge, the medial supracondylar ridge, which becomes very prominent below; it presents an anterior lip for the origins of the brachialis muscle and the pronator teres muscle, a posterior lip for the medial head of the triceps brachii muscle, and an intermediate ridge for the attachment of the medial intermuscular septum. Teres major is a muscle of the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles. ... The coracobrachialis is one of the three muscles that attach to the coracoid process of the scapula. ... Brachialis is a flexor muscle in the upper arm. ... The Pronator teres muscle is a muscle of the human body, in the forearm. ... The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans. ...


Surfaces

The antero-lateral surface is directed lateralward above, where it is smooth, rounded, and covered by the deltoid muscle; forward and lateralward below, where it is slightly concave from above downward, and gives origin to part of the Brachialis. About the middle of this surface is a rough, triangular elevation, the deltoid tuberosity for the insertion of the deltoid muscle; below this is the radial sulcus, directed obliquely from behind, forward, and downward, and transmitting the radial nerve and profunda artery. The deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the human shoulder. ... The deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the human shoulder. ...


The antero-medial surface, less extensive than the antero-lateral, is directed medialward above, forward and medialward below; its upper part is narrow, and forms the floor of the intertubercular groove which gives insertion to the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle; its middle part is slightly rough for the attachment of some of the fibers of the tendon of insertion of the coracobrachialis muscle; its lower part is smooth, concave from above downward, and gives origin to the brachialis muscle. Latissimus dorsi is a large flat muscle located on the back. ... The coracobrachialis is one of the three muscles that attach to the coracoid process of the scapula. ... Brachialis is a flexor muscle in the upper arm. ...


The posterior surface appears somewhat twisted, so that its upper part is directed a little medialward, its lower part backward and a little lateralward. Nearly the whole of this surface is covered by the lateral and medial heads of the Triceps brachii, the former arising above, the latter below the radial sulcus.


The lower extremity

The lower extremity is flattened from before backward, and curved slightly forward; it ends below in a broad, articular surface, which is divided into two parts by a slight ridge.


Projecting on either side are the lateral and medial epicondyles.


The articular surface extends a little lower than the epicondyles, and is curved slightly forward; its medial extremity occupies a lower level than the lateral.


The lateral portion of this surface consists of a smooth, rounded eminence, named the capitulum of the humerus; it articulates with the cupshaped depression on the head of the radius, and is limited to the front and lower part of the bone.


On the medial side of this eminence is a shallow groove, in which is received the medial margin of the head of the radius.


Above the front part of the capitulum is a slight depression, the radial fossa, which receives the anterior border of the head of the radius, when the forearm is flexed.


The medial portion of the articular surface is named the trochlea, and presents a deep depression between two well-marked borders; it is convex from before backward, concave from side to side, and occupies the anterior, lower, and posterior parts of the extremity.


The lateral border separates it from the groove which articulates with the margin of the head of the radius. The medial border is thicker, of greater length, and consequently more prominent, than the lateral.


The grooved portion of the articular surface fits accurately within the semilunar notch of the ulna; it is broader and deeper on the posterior than on the anterior aspect of the bone, and is inclined obliquely downward and forward toward the medial side.


Above the front part of the trochlea is a small depression, the coronoid fossa, which receives the coronoid process of the ulna during flexion of the forearm.


Above the back part of the trochlea is a deep triangular depression, the olecranon fossa, in which the summit of the olecranon is received in extension of the forearm.


These fossæ are separated from one another by a thin, transparent lamina of bone, which is sometimes perforated by a supratrochlear foramen; they are lined in the fresh state by the synovial membrane of the elbow-joint, and their margins afford attachment to the anterior and posterior ligaments of this articulation. Elbow redirects here. ...


The lateral epicondyle is a small, tuberculated eminence, curved a little forward, and giving attachment to the radial collateral ligament of the elbow-joint, and to a tendon common to the origin of the Supinator and some of the Extensor muscles. The Supinator muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...


The medial epicondyle, larger and more prominent than the lateral, is directed a little backward; it gives attachment to the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow-joint, to the Pronator teres, and to a common tendon of origin of some of the Flexor muscles of the forearm; the ulnar nerve runs in a groove on the back of this epicondyle. The Pronator teres muscle is a muscle of the human body, in the forearm. ...


The epicondyles are continuous above with the supracondylar ridges.


Ossification

Figure 4 : Plan of ossification of the humerus.
Figure 4 : Plan of ossification of the humerus.
Figure 5 : Epiphysial lines of humerus in a young adult. Anterior aspect. The lines of attachment of the articular capsules are in blue.
Figure 5 : Epiphysial lines of humerus in a young adult. Anterior aspect. The lines of attachment of the articular capsules are in blue.

(Figs. 210, 211) The humerus is ossified from eight centers, one for each of the following parts: the body, the head, the greater tubercle, the lesser tubercle, the capitulum, the trochlea, and one for each epicondyle. The center for the body appears near the middle of the bone in the eighth week of fetal life, and soon extends toward the extremities. At birth the humerus is ossified in nearly its whole length, only the extremities remaining cartilaginous. During the first year, sometimes before birth, ossification commences in the head of the bone, and during the third year the center for the greater tubercle, and during the fifth that for the lesser tubercle, make their appearance. By the sixth year the centers for the head and tubercles have joined, so as to form a single large epiphysis, which fuses with the body about the twentieth year. The lower end of the humerus is ossified as follows. At the end of the second year ossification begins in the capitulum, and extends medialward, to form the chief part of the articular end of the bone; the center for the medial part of the trochlea appears about the age of twelve. Ossification begins in the medial epicondyle about the fifth year, and in the lateral about the thirteenth or fourteenth year. About the sixteenth or seventeenth year, the lateral epicondyle and both portions of the articulating surface, having already joined, unite with the body, and at the eighteenth year the medial epicondyle becomes joined to it. File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Humerus Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ... From Grays Anatomy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... From Grays Anatomy This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


Clinical Considerations

The most common type of shoulder (glenohumeral joint) dislocation is an anterior or inferior dislocation of the humerus. This dislocation has the potential to injure the axillary nerve or axillary artery. Signs and symptoms of this dislocation are: a loss of the normal contour of the shoulder, a depression under the acromion that you can feel, and being able to feel the head of humerus in the axilla (armpit). ... The axillary nerve is a nerve of the human body, that comes off the posterior cord of the brachial plexus at the level of the axilla (armpit) and carriers nerve fibers from C5 and C6. ... Axillary artery and its branches - anterior view of right upper limb and thorax. ... The armpit (or axilla) is the area on the human body directly under the area where the arm connects to the shoulder. ...


See also

Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... In zootomy, several terms are used to describe the location of organs and other structures in the body of bilateral animals. ...

References

  • Chung, Kyung Won. Board Review Series: Gross Anatomy, 4th ed. (2000).
  • Dudek, Ronald W. High Yield Gross Anatomy, 2nd ed. (2002).
  • Moore, Keith L. and Arthur F. Dalley. Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 4th ed. (1999).

This article is based on an entry from the 1918 edition of Gray's Anatomy, which is in the public domain. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...



Human Bones
VERTEBRAL COLUMN: vertebrae (cervical - atlas - axis | thoracic | lumbar) | sacrum | coccyx

THORAX: sternum | rib A typical adult human skeleton consists of the following 206 bones. ... The vertebral column seen from the side Different regions (curvatures) of the vertebral column The vertebral column (backbone or spine) is a column of vertebrae situated in the dorsal aspect of the abdomen. ... A diagram of a thoracic vertebra. ... A cervical vertebra Cervical vertebrae (Vertebrae cervicales) are the smallest of the true vertebrae, and can be readily distinguished from those of the thoracic or lumbar regions by the presence of a foramen (hole) in each transverse process. ... First cervical vertebra, or Atlas In anatomy, the Atlas (C1) is the topmost (first) cervical vertebra of the spine. ... In anatomy, the second cervical vertebra (C2) of the spine is named the axis or epistropheus. ... A typical thoracic vertebra The thoracic vertebrae (vertebrae thoracales) compose the middle segment of the vertebral column, between the cervical vertebrae and the lumbar vertebrae. ... Categories: Anatomy stubs | Anatomy ... Sacrum, pelvic surface The sacrum (os sacrum) is a large, triangular bone at the base of the vertebral column and at the upper and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge between the two hip bones. ... The coccyx is formed of four fused vertebrae. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ... Figure 1 : Anterior surface of sternum and costa cartilages. ... The human rib cage. ...


cranial bones of SKULL: occipital | parietal | frontal | temporal | sphenoid | ethmoid A hippopotamus skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of Craniates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... The occipital bone [Fig. ... The parietal bones (os parietale) are bones in the human skull and form, by their union, the sides and roof of the cranium. ... The frontal bone (os frontale, TA: A02. ... The temporal bones (os temporales) are situated at the sides and base of the skull. ... Figure 1 : Sphenoid bone, upper surface. ... Your skull is in your back (this is obviously not true, I was just testing the website to see if it really works) The ethmoid bone (os ethmoidale) is a bone in the skull that separates the nasal cavity from the brain. ...


facial bones of SKULL nasal | maxilla | lacrimal | zygomatic | palatine | inferior nasal conchae | vomer | mandible | hyoid A hippopotamus skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of Craniates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... The Nasal Bones (Ossa Faciei & Ossa Nasalia) are two small oblong bones, varying in size and form in different individuals; they are placed side by side at the middle and upper part of the face, and form, by their junction, the bridge of the nose. ... The maxillae are the largest bones of the face, except for the mandible, and form, by their union, the whole of the upper jaw. ... The lacrimal bone (Os Lacrimale), the smallest and most fragile bone of the face, is situated at the front part of the medial wall of the orbit . ... The zygomatic bone (also known as the zygoma; Os Zygomaticum; Malar Bone) is a paired bone of the human skull. ... The palatine bone is a bone situated at the back part of the nasal cavity between the maxilla and the pterygoid process of the sphenoid. ... The inferior nasal concha (Concha Nasalis Inferior; Inferior Turbinated Bone) extends horizontally along the lateral wall of the nasal cavity [Fig. ... The vomer bone is one of the unpaired facial bones of the skull. ... The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face. ... The hyoid bone (Os Hyoideum; Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, not articulated to any other bone; it is supported by the muscles of the neck and in turn supports the root of the tongue. ...


UPPER EXTREMITY: clavicle | scapula | humerus | ulna | radius Left clavicle - from above Left clavicle - from below Collarbone (a bone) redirects here. ... Left scapula - front view () Left scapula - rear view () In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ... The ulna (Elbow Bone) [Figs. ... The radius and ulna of the left forearm, posterior surface. ...


carpus (scaphoid | lunate bone | triquetral | pisiform | trapezium | trapezoid | capitate | hamate) | metacarpals | phalanges (prox | int | dist) In Greek mythology, Carpus fruit was a son of Chloris and Boreas. ... The scaphoid bone of the wrist is found on the thumb side of the hand, within the anatomical snuffbox. ... The lunate bone (os lunatum; semilunar bone) is a bone in the human hand that may be distinguished by its deep concavity and crescentic outline. ... The triquetral bone (also called triquetral, os triquetrum, cuneiform bone, pyramidal bone, cubital bone, os pyramidale, os triangulare, three-cornered bone, and triangular bone) is a type of carpal bone. ... The left pisiform bone. ... The trapezium is a bone in the human hand. ... In human anatomy, the trapezoid bone (lesser multangular bone; os multangulum minus) is a bone in the hands. ... The capitate bone (os capitatum; os magnum) is a bone in the human hand. ... The hamate bone (os hamatum; unciform bone) is a bone in the human hand that may be readily distinguished by its wedge-shaped form, and the hook-like process which projects from its volar surface. ... The metacarpus is the intermediate part of the hand skeleton that is located between the fingers distally and the carpus which forms the connection to the forearm. ... Proximal phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrates. ... Intermediate phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrates. ... Distal phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrate skeletons. ...


LOWER EXTREMITY: pelvis (ilium, ischium, pubis, acetabulum) | femur (greater trochanter - lesser trochanter - linea aspera) | patella | fibula | tibia Human male pelvis, viewed from front Human female pelvis, viewed from front The pelvis is the bony structure located at the base of the spine (properly known as the caudal end). ... The ilium is a bone that is part of the pelvis. ... The ischium forms the lower and back part of the hip bone. ... The pubis, the anterior part of the hip bone, is divisible into a body, a superior and an inferior ramus. ... Categories: Anatomy stubs | Skeletal system ... If you were looking for an organization, see FEMA. The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous and strongest bone of the human body. ... Bones of the Hip In anatomy, the hip is the bony projection of the femur, known as the greater trochanter, and the overlying muscle and fat. ... The Lesser Trochanter (small trochanter) of the femur is a conical eminence, which varies in size in different subjects; it projects from the lower and back part of the base of the neck. ... The linea aspera is a ridge of roughened surface on the posterior aspect of the femur, to which are attached muscles and intermusclular septa. ... Left patella - anterior aspect Left patella - posterior aspect The patella or kneecap is a thick, triangular bone which articulates with the femur and covers and protects the front of the knee joint. ... Figure 1 : Lower extremity of right fibula. ... Figure 1 : Upper surface of right tibia. ...


tarsus (calcaneus | talus | navicular | cuneiform | cuboid ) | metatarsals | phalanges (prox | int | dist) FIG. 268– Bones of the right foot. ... The calcaneus is the large bone making up the heel of the human foot. ... FIG. 270– Left talus, from above. ... The navicular bone (also called the navicular or scaphoid) is a small boat-shaped human bone of the tarsus. ... There are three cuneiform bones in the human foot: the medial cuneiform, the intermediate cuneiform and the lateral cuneiform. ... The cuboid bone is one of seven Tarsal bones. ... The metatarsus consists of the five long bones of the foot, which are numbered from the medial side (ossa metatarsalia I.-V.); each presents for examination a body and two extremities. ... Proximal phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrates. ... Intermediate phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrates. ... Distal phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrate skeletons. ...


OSSICLES: malleus | incus | stapes The ossicles (also called auditory ossicles) are the three smallest bones in the human body. ... The malleus is hammer-shaped small bone or ossicle of the middle ear which connects with the incus and is attached to the inner surface of the eardrum. ... The incus is the anvil-shaped small bone or ossicle in the middle ear. ... stapes The stapes or stirrup is the stirrup-shaped small bone or ossicle in the middle ear which attaches the incus to the fenestra ovalis, the oval window which is adjacent to the vestibule of the inner ear. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Humerus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2508 words)
The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the shoulder to the elbow.
The head of the humerus (caput humeri) articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula at the glenohumeral joint.
The anatomical neck of the humerus is an indentation distal to the head of the humerus on which the articular capsule attaches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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