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Encyclopedia > Humeral veil

The humeral veil is one of the liturgical vestments of the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. It consists of a piece of cloth about 2.75 m long and 90 cm wide draped over the shoulders and down the front, normally of silk or gold. At the ends there are usually pockets in the back for hands to go into so that the wearer can hold items without touching them with his or her hands. When it was more widely used as part of the Liturgy, before the reforms surrounding Vatican II, the humeral veil matched the liturgical colours of the vestments, but if it didn't it would have been white or gold. Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Silk weaver Silk is a natural protein fibre that can be woven into textiles. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Liturgical colours are colours of vestments and church decorations within a Christian liturgy. ...


It is most often seen during the liturgy of Exposition and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. The priest or deacon uses it when he or holds the monstrance over the people at the benediction part of the rite. The Celebrant covers his or her hands with the ends of the veil so that his or her hands do not touch the monstrance, thus symbolizing that it is Jesus present in the Eucharist that blesses the people and not the minister. A benediction is a short invocation for divine help, blessing and guidance, usually after a church worship service. ... Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... Categories: Stub | Roman Catholic Sacraments and Other Practices ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, the river Celebrant was a stream rising in the eastern Misty Mountains near the exit from Moria. ... Jesus, Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene (8-4 BC/BCE – 29-36 AD/CE), is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. The main sources regarding Jesus life and... The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ...


Until the reform of the minor orders after the Second Vatican Council, it was also used by the subdeacon at High Mass when he carried the chalice, paten, or other sacred vessels since those were to be touched only by the deacon. The minor orders were formally a part of the clergy of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... In the United States of America the term High Mass refers to what in Great Britain & Ireland, as well as in many traditional-minded Anglo-Catholic parishes in the U.S.A., is called Sung Mass or Misa Cantata. ... Russian chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... A paten is a small plate, usually made of silver or gold, used to hold Eucharistic hosts. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ...


The vimpa, similar to a humeral veil, is sometimes used during for the Pontifical Mass. Whenever a bishop presides over Mass and uses a mitre and crosier, the altar servers assigned to hold those items for the prelate would cover themselves with the vimp before holding them, symbolizing that the items do not belong to them. Vimpa Liturgical vestment worn by servers in the Roman Rite. ... Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the various liturgical rites of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglo-Catholic tradition of Anglicanism, and in certain Lutheran parishes and provinces, such as the Church of Sweden which are largely High Church. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... MITRE is a US not-for-profit corporation that manages three federally-funded research and development centers whose main activities are applying computer-based automation to large and complex tasks. ... // Staff A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Catholic prelates. ... An altar server is a lay assistant to a member of the clergy during a religious service. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Humeral veil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (326 words)
The humeral veil is one of the liturgical vestments of the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches.
The Celebrant covers his or her hands with the ends of the veil so that his or her hands do not touch the monstrance, thus symbolizing that it is Jesus present in the Eucharist that blesses the people and not the minister.
The vimpa, similar to a humeral veil, is sometimes used during for the Pontifical Mass.
Humeral Veil (793 words)
Humeral veils for use on festivals are often richly embroidered.
There is no fl humeral veil, for the reason that at Masses for the dead, as well as on Good Friday, the paten remains on the altar.
The acolyte continued, even in the later Middle Ages, to use a humeral veil (palliolum, sindon, mantellum) when carrying the paten, and the present Roman custom, according to which the subdeacon is vested in the humeral veil when holding the paten, originated at the close of the Middle Ages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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