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Encyclopedia > Human rights abuse
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Human rights violation. (Discuss)
Articles related to Abuse.
By means

Physical abuse
Torture / Severe Corporal punishment Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Human rights abuse. ... Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else. ... Physical abuse is abuse involving contact intended to cause pain, injury, or other physical suffering or harm. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was an infamous and rarely used torture device. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Psychological abuse
Humiliation / Intimidation / Bullying
Hate speech / Manipulation / Stalking
/ Coercive persuasion
Sexual abuse
Sexual assault / Rape
Sexual harassment Psychological abuse refers to the humiliation or intimidation of another person, but is also used to refer to the long-term effects of emotional shock. ... Humiliation is literally the act of being made humble, or reduced in standing or prestige. ... Intimidation is the act of making others do what one wants through fear. ... A bully is an individual who tends to torment others, either through verbal harassment or physical assaults, or through more subtle methods of coercion. ... Hate speech is a controversial term for speech intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against someone based on his/her race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In mathematics, stalk usually refers to the idea of the stalk of a sheaf. ... Brainwashing controversies According to research and forensic psychologist Dick Anthony, the CIA invented the brainwashing ideology as a propaganda strategy to undercut communist claims that American POWs in Korean communist camps had voluntarily expressed sympathy for communism and that definitive research demonstrated that collaboration by western POWs had been caused... Sexual abuse is a relative cultural term used to describe sexual relations and behavior between two or more parties which are considered criminally and/or morally offensive. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Sexual harassment is harassment of a sexual nature, typically in the workplace or other setting where raising objections or refusing may have negative consequences. ...

By victim

Child abuse / Domestic violence
Prisoner abuse / Elder abuse
Animal abuse Child abuse is the physical or psychological maltreatment of a child. ... Domestic violence broadly defined, is violence within a home. ... Prisoner abuse is the mistreatment of persons while they are under arrest or incarcerated. ... Elder abuse is a single or repeated act or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust, which causes harm or distress to an older person. ... Cruelty to animals refers to treatment which causes unacceptable suffering or harm to animals. ...

By offender

Police brutality
Human experimentation Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, and verbal attacks and threats by police officers. ... Medical experiments on human beings are an important part of medical research, and many people volunteer for clinical trials of medical treatments. ...

Human rights abuse is abuse of people in a way that violates any fundamental human rights. The correct usage of the term in legal sense is within the historical context and time frame when the term "human rights" was introduced and has been in use. For older historical periods the term "uman rights abuse" is reasonable to use in comparative and descriptive ways. Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (generally accepted as the international standard for human rights), fundamental human rights are violated when: Wikisource has original text related to this article: Universal Declaration of Human Rights The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (also UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, December 10, 1948), outlining a view on basic human rights. ...

  • A certain race, creed, or group is denied recognition as a "person". (Article 2)
  • Men and women are not treated as equal. (Article 2)
  • Different racial or religious groups are not treated as equal. (Article 2)
  • Life, liberty or security of person are threatened. (Article 3)
  • A person is sold as or used as a slave. (Article 4)
  • Cruel or unusual punishment is used on a person (such as torture or execution). (Article 5)
  • Punishments are dealt arbitrarily or unilaterally, without a proper and fair trial. (Article 11)
  • Arbitrary interference into personal, or private lives by agents of the state. (Article 12)
  • Citizens are forbidden to leave their country. (Article 13)
  • Freedom of speech or religion are denied. (Articles 18 & 19)
  • The right to join a union is denied. (Article 23)
  • Education is denied. (Article 26)

Human rights abuses are more common in dictatorships or theocracies, whereas they are rarer in democracies. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Validity of human races. ... A creed is a statement of belief—usually religious belief—or faith. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... The statement that the government shall not inflict cruel and unusual punishment for crimes is found in the English Bill of Rights signed in 1689 by William of Orange and Queen Mary II who were then the joint rulers of England following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was an infamous and rarely used torture device. ... The Right to a fair trial is an essential right in all countries respecting the rule of law. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dictatorship, in contemporary usage, refers to absolute rule by a leadership (usually one dictator) unrestricted by law, constitutions, or other social and political factors within the state. ... The term theocracy is used to describe a form of government in which a religion or faith plays a dominant role. ...


Human rights organizations such as Amnesty International (AI) have criticized the use of the death penalty, however, in some democracies such as the United States, particularly when the penalty is used against those who were minors when they committed the crime in question. Only a very few countries do not violate human rights at all according to AI. In their 2004 human rights report, (covering 2003,) the Netherlands, Norway, Denmark, Iceland and Costa Rica are the only (mappable) countries that did not violate human rights. Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... The term minor (from Latin smaller, lesser) has several meanings: Minor is a legal term for a young person, see Minor (law). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Many international non-governmental organizations such as International Freedom of Expression Exchange, Freedom House, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and Anti-Slavery International monitor and condemn human rights abuses. A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization that is not part of a government and was not founded by states. ... The International Freedom of Expression eXchange (IFEX), founded in 1992, is a global network of more than 60 non-governmental organisations that promotes and defends the right to freedom of expression. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Human Rights Watch is an international non-governmental organization based in New York City, USA, that conducts advocacy and research on human rights issues. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... Anti-Slavery International is a charity and lobby group, based in the United Kingdom. ...


External links

  • A Tamil human rights news portal

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Human rights abuse (1331 words)
Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else.
Human experimentation Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, and verbal attacks and threats by police officers.
Human rights organizations such as Amnesty International (AI) have criticized the use of the death penalty, however, in some democracies such as the United States, particularly when the penalty is used against those who were minors when they committed the crime in question.
Human Rights Abuse Rampant in Congo War (Human Rights Watch, 25-2-1999) (604 words)
Congolese rebels have committed serious human rights abuses and should be criticized together with the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today.
It also enumerates human rights abuses by the government, including ethnic persecution, restrictions on basic freedoms, and violations of the laws of war.
Human Rights Watch, an international monitoring group based in New York, urges all parties to the conflict, including foreign forces, to abide by international humanitarian law and to protect civilians during the conflict.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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