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Encyclopedia > Human population
World population 1950-2000
Increase rate 1950-2000

The current estimated world human population is 6,427,631,117. This figure is deceptively precise, however, since there is no complete database on the world's population, and humans are constantly being born (at the rate of about 3 per second) and dying. However, it is clear that the world's population continues to grow, and at rates that are unprecedented prior to the 20th century. Approximately one fifth of all people who have lived on the earth in the past six thousand years are alive today. A chart of total world population 1952-2002 Created 6 Dec 2003 by Securiger, derived from data provided by U.S. Bureau of the Census File links The following pages link to this file: Malthusian catastrophe World population Categories: GFDL images ... A chart of total world population 1952-2002 Created 6 Dec 2003 by Securiger, derived from data provided by U.S. Bureau of the Census File links The following pages link to this file: Malthusian catastrophe World population Categories: GFDL images ... A chart of changes in world population 1952-2002 Created 6 Dec 2003 by Securiger from data provided by U.S. Bureau of the Census File links The following pages link to this file: Malthusian catastrophe Overpopulation World population Categories: GFDL images ... A chart of changes in world population 1952-2002 Created 6 Dec 2003 by Securiger from data provided by U.S. Bureau of the Census File links The following pages link to this file: Malthusian catastrophe Overpopulation World population Categories: GFDL images ... Binomial name Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies Homo sapiens idaltu (extinct) Homo sapiens sapiens Human beings define themselves in biological, social, and spiritual terms. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


By some estimates, there are now one billion (thousand million) young people in the world between the ages of 15 and 24. The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... In biology, senescence is the state or process of aging. ... A young adult is an informal term used to describe the transition from teenager to adult. ...


(The term "billion" above is used to mean "thousand million", "milliard", 109, rather than "million million" as used in some countries. See billion for details.) The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ...

Contents

When was six billion reached?

The United Nations Population Fund designated October 12, 1999 as the approximate day on which world population reached six billion. This was about 12 years after world population reached five billion, in 1987. The child that has been proclaimed by the United Nations Population Fund and welcomed by the U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan as the six billionth baby, was born on the designated day two minutes after midnight, not in India or China, as might be expected, but to Fatima Nevic and her husband Jasminko in Sarajevo, Bosnia. October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Nations Fund for Population Activities was started in 1969 and renamed the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in 1987. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 7th Secretary-General Term of Office: January 1, 1997–present Predecessor: Boutros Boutros-Ghali Successor: incumbent Born: April 8, 1938 Place of birth: Kumasi, Ghana Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Sarajevo (Summer 2004) Downtown Sarajevo and the Miljacka river. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ...


Rate of population increase

The last 70 years of the 20th century saw the biggest increase in the world's population in human history. The following table shows when each billion milestone was met: World historic population curve graphed from lower summary estimates at US Census Bureau This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... World historic population curve graphed from lower summary estimates at US Census Bureau This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...

  • 1 billion reached in 1802.
  • 2 billion reached in 1927.
  • 3 billion reached in 1961.
  • 4 billion reached in 1974.
  • 5 billion reached in 1987.
  • 6 billion reached in 1999.

From the figures above, the world's population has tripled in 72 years, and doubled in 38 years up to the year of 1999. 1802 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year—i. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

Including a few more estimates (beginning with 250 million in 950 and ending with 8 billion in 2027), the world population was doubled by the following years (doubling times in parentheses): Download high resolution version (1047x737, 42 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1047x737, 42 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

  • 950 (650) 1600 (202) 1802 (125) 1927 (44) 1971 (56) 2027,

or (beginning with 375 million in 1420):

  • 1420 (300) 1720 (155) 1875 (86) 1961 (38) 1999.

The UN estimated in 2000 that the world's population was then growing at the rate of 1.2 percent (or 77 million people) per year. This represents a decrease in the growth rate from its level in 1990, mostly due to decreasing birth rates. This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population growth is changing of the amount of population over time. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As of 2004, the world's population is increasing at a rate of 75 million people per year. 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... One million (1000000), one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999999 and preceding 1000001. ...


Forecast of world population

The future growth of population is difficult to predict. Birth rates are declining slightly on average, but vary greatly between developed countries (where birth rates are often at or below replacement levels) and developing countries. Death rates can change unexpectedly due to disease, wars and catastrophes, or advances in medicine. The UN itself has issued multiple projections of future world population, based on different assumptions. Over the last 10 years, the UN has consistently revised its world population projections downward.


The current projections from the UN's Population Division, from their 2004 revision of the World Population Prospects database [1] (http://esa.un.org/unpp/), are: 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Year Population (billions)
2010 6.8
2020 7.6
2030 8.2
2040 8.7
2050 9.1

Other projections of population growth predict that the world's population will eventually crest, though it is uncertain exactly when or how. In some scenarios, the population will crest as early as the mid-21st century at under 10 billion, due to gradually decreasing birth rates.


In less optimistic scenarios, disasters triggered by a growing population's demand for scarce resources will cause a sudden population crash, or even a Malthusian catastrophe. (See overpopulation for more details.) A Malthusian catastrophe, sometimes known as a Malthusian check, is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of agricultural (or, in later formulations, economic) production being eventually outstripped by growth in population. ... World population increase. ...


Doomsayers

In 1798, Thomas Malthus predicted that population growth would eventually outrun food supply, resulting in catastrophe. In 1968 Paul R. Ehrlich reignited this argument with his book The Population Bomb, which helped give the issue significant mindshare throughout the 1960s and 1970s. The dire predictions of Ehrlich and other neo-Malthusians were vigourously challenged by a number of economists, notably Julian Simon. 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Rev. ... A Malthusian catastrophe, sometimes known as a Malthusian check, is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of agricultural (or, in later formulations, economic) production being eventually outstripped by growth in population. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Dr. Paul Ralph Ehrlich (born May 29, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Stanford University professor and a renowned entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera (butterflies). ... The Population Bomb (1968) is a book written by Paul R. Ehrlich. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... Julian Lincoln Simon (February 12, 1932–February 8, 1998) was professor of business administration at the University of Maryland and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. ...


More recently, some scholars have put forward the Doomsday argument applying Bayesian probability to world population to argue that the end of humanity will come sooner than we usually think. The Doomsday argument is a probabilistic argument that claims to predict the future lifetime of the human race given only an estimate of the total number of humans born so far. ... Bayesianism is the philosophical tenet that the mathematical theory of probability applies to the degree of plausibility of a statement. ...


Different continents

Population evolution in different continents
Source: http://esa.un.org/unpp/ United Nations

The vertical axis of the chart above is in thousands. Likewise, the population figures in the table below are in thousands. Download high resolution version (1221x760, 23 KB)Evolution of population in different continents, by user:donarreiskoffer, source: United Nations, http://esa. ... Download high resolution version (1221x760, 23 KB)Evolution of population in different continents, by user:donarreiskoffer, source: United Nations, http://esa. ...

Year World Africa Asia Europe Latin-America North America Oceania
1750 791000 106000 502000 163000 16000 2000 2000
1800 978000 107000 635000 203000 24000 7000 2000
1850 1262000 111000 809000 276000 38000 26000 2000
1900 1650000 133000 947000 408000 74000 82000 6000
1950 2518629 221214 1398488 547403 167097 171616 12812
1955 2755823 246746 1541947 575184 190797 186884 14265
1960 3021475 277398 1701336 604401 218300 204152 15888
1965 3334874 313744 1899424 634026 250452 219570 17657
1970 3692492 357283 2143118 655855 284856 231937 19443
1975 4068109 408160 2397512 675542 321906 243425 21564
1980 4434682 469618 2632335 692431 361401 256068 22828
1985 4830979 541814 2887552 706009 401469 269456 24678
1990 5263593 622443 3167807 721582 441525 283549 26687
1995 5674380 707462 3430052 727405 481099 299438 28924
2000 6070581 795671 3679737 727986 520229 315915 31043
2005 6453628 887964 3917508 724722 558281 332156 32998
2010 6830283 984225 4148948 719714 594436 348139 34821
2015 7197247 1084540 4370522 713402 628260 363953 36569
2020 7540237 1187584 4570131 705410 659248 379589 38275
2025 7851455 1292085 4742232 696036 686857 394312 39933
2030 8130149 1398004 4886647 685440 711058 407532 41468
2035 8378184 1504179 5006700 673638 731591 419273 42803
2040 8593591 1608329 5103021 660645 747953 429706 43938
2045 8774394 1708407 5175311 646630 759955 439163 44929
2050 8918724 1803298 5222058 631938 767685 447931 45815

External links

... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Population - Biodiversity Linkage (3525 words)
Even in local case studies where researchers found the growth of nearby human populations to be the most apparent locus of biodiversity loss, these same authors consistently indicated that, on close analysis, a complex mix of interacting conditions and failed remedies were involved (Dompka 1996, Goriup 1998, Brechin et al 1994).
There is clear evidence connecting human population growth to many of the direct causes of biodiversity loss, including habitat loss and fragmentation, biological invasion, pollution, over-harvesting, and human-induced climate change.
And we humans ourselves—simultaneously the threat to, and the caretaker of, earthly life—will be among the greatest beneficiaries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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