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Encyclopedia > Human Rights Campaign
Human Rights Campaign

The HRC equal sign logo represents equality.
The HRC equal sign logo represents equality. The equal sign, equals sign, or = is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. ...

Motto Working for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equal Rights
Formation 1980
Location Washington, D.C.
President Joe Solmonese
Website http://www.hrc.org

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) lobbying group and political action committee in the United States, claiming more than 700,000 members and supporters. This membership count is questioned by some.[1][2][3] The HRC mission statement is "HRC envisions an America where LGBT people are ensured of their basic equal rights; and can be open, honest and safe at home, at work and in the community."[4] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      // New York in , 51 N.Y.2d 476, 434 N.Y.S.2d 947, 415 N.E.2d 936 (1980) and Pennsylvania in , 490 Pa. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Joe Solmonese Joe Solmonese was appointed President of the Human Rights Campaign and its affiliate, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, on March 9, 2005. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Bisexual redirects here. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... LGBT (also GLBT) is an acronym referring collectively to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual people. ... This article is about political advocates. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ...

Contents

Programs, functions, and actions of the HRC

The Human Rights Campaign is a visible entity in U.S. politics. It lobbies Congress for support of LGBT-positive bills, works to build an LGBT-friendly Congress by funding those politicians that support the LGBT community, mobilizes grassroots action amongst its members, and encourages members to exercise their right to vote in every election. The organization overwhelmingly supports Democratic candidates running for office, although HRC supports some moderate Republicans.[5] For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... A grassroots movement (often referenced in the context of a political movement) is one driven by the constituents of a community. ... Suffrage (from the Latin suffragium, meaning voting tablet, and figuratively right to vote; probably from suffrago hough, and originally a term for the pastern bone used to cast votes) is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ...


Through its website, the HRC also helps members identify their state and local lawmakers, review scorecards of how legislators rate on LGBT issues, and draft correspondence to lawmakers. Additionally, the website helps members research state and local laws on issues that are central to LGBT causes. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... A legislator (or lawmaker) is a person who writes and passes laws, especially someone who is a member of a legislature. ...


Additionally, HRC maintains suggestions on how to come out and information about workplace issues (in the Corporate Equality Index). For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Office (disambiguation). ... The Corporate Equality Index is a report published by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation as a tool to rate American businesses on their treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender employees, consumers and investors. ...


History and leadership

Human Rights Campaign headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Human Rights Campaign headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The Human Rights Campaign Fund was established in 1980 by Steve Endean to raise money for gay-supportive congressional candidates. Within three months, the HRC was registered with the Federal Election Commission as an independent political action committee. In 1983, Vic Basile, one of the leading LGBT rights activists in Washington, D.C. at the time, was elected as the first executive director. In October 1986, the HRC Foundation was formed. As with many gay organizations in the 1980s, HRC was devastated by the onslaught of AIDS and its membership spent much of the decade struggling to hold their ground. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


In January 1989, Basile announced his departure, and the HRC reorganized from serving mainly as a political action committee (PAC) to becoming a lobbying and political organization. HRC's new Statement of Purpose became,

For the promotion of the social welfare of the gay and lesbian community by drafting, supporting and influencing legislation and policy at the federal, state and local level.

Tim McFeeley, a graduate of Harvard Law School, and founder of the Boston Lesbian and Gay Political Alliance and a co-chair of the New England HRC Committee, was elected the new executive director. Total membership was then approximately 25,000 members.[citation needed] Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


In 1992, the HRC endorsed a presidential candidate for the first time — Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton. In March 1993, National Coming Out Day became a project of the HRC. From January 1995 until January 2004, Elizabeth Birch served as the executive director of the HRC. Under her leadership, the institution more than quadrupled its membership to 500,000 members and purchased an office building for its Washington, D.C. headquarters.[citation needed] This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... National Coming Out Day logo designed by Keith Haring National Coming Out Day is observed on October 11 by members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities and their allies. ... Elizabeth Birch is a former corporate executive who came to Washington in January of 1995 to head the Human Right Campaign, the nations largest LGBT organization. ...


The headquarters building was purchased from B'nai B'rith International in 2002 for $9.8 million. A large national capital campaign raised over $28 million for the project. After extensive renovations of the mid-century modern structure, the building is currently valued at over $18 million.[citation needed] Bnai Brith Membership Certificate, 1876. ...

The Human Rights Campaign often has a large presence at LGBT-related events such as the Chicago Pride Parade as seen above.
The Human Rights Campaign often has a large presence at LGBT-related events such as the Chicago Pride Parade as seen above.

As part of the festivities surrounding the Millennium March on Washington, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation sponsored a fundraising concert, "Equality Rocks," on April 29, 2000. Over 45,000 people attended at Washington DC's RFK Stadium to watch Melissa Etheridge, Garth Brooks, Pet Shop Boys, K.D. Lang, Nathan Lane, Rufus Wainwright, Albita Rodríguez, and Chaka Khan. Billed as a concert to end hate crimes, the event featured the parents of Matthew Shepard, and also honored families of hate crime victims. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 680 pixel, file size: 116 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chicago Pride Parade photo by User:MattHucke, 2005. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 680 pixel, file size: 116 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chicago Pride Parade photo by User:MattHucke, 2005. ... Not to be confused with John F. Kennedy Stadium. ... Melissa Lou Etheridge (born May 29, 1961, in Leavenworth, Kansas) is an Academy Award-winning and two-time Grammy Award-winning American rock musician and singer. ... Troyal Garth Brooks (born February 7, 1962) is an American Country Music artist. ... Pet Shop Boys are an English dance music duo, consisting of Neil Tennant who provides main vocals, keyboards and occasionally guitar, and Chris Lowe on keyboards and occasionally on vocals. ... K.D. Lang, OC (or k. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... Rufus McGarrigle Wainwright (born July 22, 1973) is a Canadian-American singer-songwriter. ... Albita Rodríguez, known in her music career simply as Albita, is a Grammy-winning Cuban singer and composer. ... Chaka Khan (born March 23, 1953) is a multiple Grammy Award-winning American singer known for hit songs such as Im Every Woman, I Feel For You and Through the Fire. Khan was first featured as a member of the funk band Rufus before beginning her solo career. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... Matthew Wayne Shepard (December 1, 1976 – October 12, 1998) was an American student at the University of Wyoming who was fatally attacked near Laramie, on the night of October 6 – October 7, 1998 in what was widely reported by international news media as a savage beating because of his homosexuality. ...


In August 2000, Birch became the first leader of a LGBT organization to address the convention of a major political party when she spoke before the Democratic National Convention. Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


Birch's successor, Cheryl Jacques, resigned in November 2004 after only 11 months as executive director. In a statement released by the organization, Jacques resigned over "a difference in management philosophy". Incidentally, Birch's partner, Hilary Rosen, former chief executive of the Recording Industry Association of America, was named as interim replacement. Cheryl Jacques, a U.S. politician and gay rights activist. ... Hilary B. Rosen was the chief executive of the Recording Industry Association of America from 1998 to 2003. ... RIAA redirects here. ...


On March 9, 2005, the HRC announced the appointment of Joe Solmonese as the president, describing him as one of the "nation's most accomplished and respected progressive leaders".[citation needed] is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joe Solmonese Joe Solmonese was appointed President of the Human Rights Campaign and its affiliate, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, on March 9, 2005. ...


The Human Rights Campaign also consists of a Board of Directors and a Board of Governors. The Human Rights Campaign Foundation, a non-profit entity, also maintains a separate Board. In December 2004, they named Michael S. Berman as their Board chair. Michael S. Berman is a long-time Washington lawyer and lobbyist. ...


On May 5, 2007, the House of Representatives passed the Matthew Shepard Act, which would expand the 1969 federal hate-crime law to include crimes motivated by a victim's gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability, as well as remove the existing prerequisite that the victim be engaging in a federally-protected activity. The HRC has lobbied extensively for this expansion. The legislation passed the United States Senate on September 20, 2007. The amendment was attached to the Defense Reauthorization Bill and President Bush announced he may veto the bill if it reaches his desk with the amendment attached.[6] Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2007 (LLEHCPA; sometimes called the Matthew Shepard Act), HR 1592, would expand the 1969 United States federal hate... Hate crime laws in the United States (also known as bias crimes) protect against crimes motivated by feelings of enmity or animus against a protected class. ... Gender symbols: female (left), male (right). ... Sexual orientation refers to an enduring emotional, romantic, sexual, or affectional attraction toward others,[1] usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Disabled redirects here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


HRC historical records

The historical records of the Human Rights Campaign are maintained in a collection at the Cornell University Library. Arriving at Cornell in 2004, the records include strategic-planning documents, faxes, minutes, e-mails, press releases, posters and campaign buttons which constitute the second largest collection of records in the Library's Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Human Sexuality Collection area with 84 cubic feet of records. On February 8, 2007, the records were opened to scholars at the library, and selected records were organized into an online exhibit called "25 Years of Political Influence: The Records of the Human Rights Campaign."[7][8] Cornell redirects here. ... The Cornell University Library, the library system of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, which is composed of 20 individual libraries, is one of the largest research libraries in the United States. ...


Criticism

Political ideology

Critics of the HRC have accused the organization of favoring the Democratic party platform over gay and lesbian equality in regards to gay marriage and ending the don't ask, don't tell policy.[9][10][11] The HRC states they are fighting for equality in all areas of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender rights. This article is about the U.S. military policy. ...


Andrew Sullivan, a prominent conservative gay political columnist and blogger, has been critical of the HRC calling them "a patronage wing of the Democratic party, designed primarily to get its members jobs in future Democratic administrations or with Democrats on the Hill (even while Howard Dean treats them like the help). The idea that they would even consider endorsing a pro-gay Republican on a national level is absurd."[12] The organization responded by saying, "There’s nobody happier about what Andrew Sullivan is doing than Tony Perkins and James Dobson."[13] Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Tony Perkins (born March 20, 1963) is the President of the Family Research Council, a conservative Christian think-tank and public policy foundation. ... James Clayton Jim Dobson (born April 21, 1936 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American evangelical Christian and chairman of the board of Focus on the Family, a nonprofit organization he founded in 1977, from which he has never drawn a salary, but which has promoted his related books and publications...


As of January 2008, HRC campaign donations for the 2008 election have totaled $396,940. That amount includes $377,154, or 95% of the total, to Democrats.[14]


Membership

HRC has been accused of overstating the number of actual members in order to appear more influential in politics.[15][16] HRC refuses to release the count of current, dues-paying members.[17]


1998 New York Senate election

The HRC angered many of its supporters in New York, and many of its African American, Asian American, and female supporters nationwide by endorsing Republican Senator Al D'Amato in the 1998 election.[18] D'Amato earned the nomination by supporting an end to discrimination in the workplace and voting to allow gays and lesbians to openly serve in the military, but his stances against abortion, and affirmative action and racist jokes he told at the expense of Judge Lance Ito left many LGBT people angry over the nomination.[citation needed] D'Amato went on to be defeated by Chuck Schumer. This article is about the state. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Lance Allan Ito (born August 2, 1950 in Los Angeles, California) is a Japanese-American Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, best known for his role in the O. J. Simpson murder trial. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ...


ENDA

HRC has been criticized for supporting a version of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act which lacks language including protections for transgendered people and gender identity.[19] On September 14, 2007, HRC President Joe Solmonese promised to oppose any ENDA legislation that did not include transgender provisions, and only to support those that did include them; a policy first articulated in 2004.[20] HRC reversed this position on October 2nd by ceasing opposition of a transgender-exclusive ENDA, which lead to the resignation of board member Donna Rose on October 3rd.[21] On November 6th, HRC once again announced its support for a new exclusive version,[20] a change which they attempted to cover up.[22] The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), is a proposed U.S. federal law that would prohibit discrimination against employees on the basis of sexual orientation. ...


Support of Bush's social security plan

HRC was criticized by gay activists when the group's leaders announced that the organization would be softening its demands for equal rights and consider making political bargains, such as supporting President George W. Bush's plan to privatize Social Security partly in exchange for the right of gay partners to receive benefits under the program.[23][24] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ...


Presidential forum

In 2007, HRC and Logo sponsored the first presidential forum in history to discuss LGBT-related issues. The event was criticized for excluding Democratic presidential nominee Mike Gravel from the debate. Gravel said, "According to a HRC spokesperson, I didn't raise enough money and therefore my candidacy did not meet their standard of 'viability.' But that's strange — CNN, PBS, NBC and the NAACP invited me to their debates without evaluating my financial viability. Ironically I think the real reason why HRC didn't invite me is that I'm too vocal in my advocacy of gay rights. None of the top tier candidates would have been comfortable facing an opponent who consistently points out their refusal to embrace true equality for gays and lesbians. HRC simply bowed to the star factor. It's just a shame that this travesty was perpetrated in the name of the LGBT community."[25] Senator Gravel in the end was invited to the forum, and Rep. Dennis Kucinich and he were the only candidates to express support for same-sex marriage. Logo is an American digital cable television channel owned by Viacoms MTV Networks division. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... PBS redirects here. ... This article is about the television network. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ...


Leaders

  1. Steve Endean, HRC founder (1980–1983)
  2. Executive Director Vic Basile (1983–1989)
  3. Executive Director Tim McFeeley (1989–1995)
  4. Executive Director Elizabeth Birch (1995–2004)
  5. President Cheryl Jacques (2004)
  6. President Joe Solmonese (2005–present)

Elizabeth Birch is a former corporate executive who came to Washington in January of 1995 to head the Human Right Campaign, the nations largest LGBT organization. ... Cheryl Jacques, a U.S. politician and gay rights activist. ... Joe Solmonese Joe Solmonese was appointed President of the Human Rights Campaign and its affiliate, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, on March 9, 2005. ...

Musical merchandising

In 2002, the Human Rights Campaign, in collaboration with Centaur Entertainment, released an awareness album named Being Out Rocks. It was released on October 11, 2002 to celebrate National Coming Out Day that year. It features a cross-section of LGBT and gay-supportive straight artists. Its release was accompanied with signing events at the Times Square Virgin Megastore in New York City and at the HRC Action Center in Washington, D.C. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Being Out Rocks is a compilation album released October 11, 2002 by the Human Rights Campaign, in collaboration with Centaur Entertainment. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... National Coming Out Day logo designed by Keith Haring National Coming Out Day is observed on October 11 by members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities and their allies. ... LGBT (also GLBT) is an acronym referring collectively to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual people. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... Virgin Megastores is an international chain of record shops, founded by Sir Richard Branson on Londons Oxford Street in January or February 1971 (exact date uncertain). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


On February 8, 2005, the Human Rights Campaign released its second CD compilation with Centaur, a 2-disc set called Love Rocks. is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Love Rocks is a compilation album released on 8 February 2005, by the Human Rights Campaign in Centaur. ...


National corporate sponsors

As of August 2007, the following companies are the current national corporate sponsors of HRC:[26]

Docosanol, also known as behenyl alcohol, is a saturated fatty alcohol used mainly as an antiviral agent, specifically for treatment of cold sores caused by the herpes simplex virus. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a United Kingdom-based pharmaceutical, biological, and healthcare company. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... Out is a popular gay magazine that focuses mainly on gay and lesbian fashion and upscale culture. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with PlanetOut_Inc. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... Beaulieu Vineyard was established in 1900 in Napa Valley, Californiia. ... This article is about the energy corporation. ... Citi redirects here. ... -1... This article is about the corporation Dell, Inc. ... Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (also branded as Deloitte. ... Ernst & Young is one of the largest professional services firms in the world, and one of the Big Four auditors, along with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (Deloitte) and KPMG. Ernst & Young is a global organization consisting of many member firms. ... Foley & Lardner LLP is an international general practice law firm started in 1842 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... Hotels. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... MGM Mirage (NYSE: MGM) is a Las Vegas, Nevada-based business engaged in the development, ownership and operation of hotels and casinos throughout the world. ... Mitchell Gold Co. ... Motorola Inc. ... Nike, Inc. ... Olivia Records was a collective founded in 1973 to record and market womens music. ... Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP, known more commonly as Paul Hastings, is an international law firm with over 1,100 attorneys and 18 offices worldwide. ... A former PwC office building (Southwark Towers) in London, England. ... This article refers to Prudential Financial, based in the United States. ... The Shell emblem known as the Pecten Shell Oil Company (SOC) is the Houston, Texas based wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ... Volvo Cars, or Volvo Personvagnar, is a well-known Swedish automobile maker founded in 1927 in the city of Gothenburg in Sweden. ... “WaMu” redirects here. ... “XM” redirects here. ...

See also

The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ...

References

  1. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  2. ^ HRC ‘members’ include all who ever donated $1 - Washington Blade
  3. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  4. ^ HRC | What We Do
  5. ^ Donor Profiles
  6. ^ US Senate passes gay hate crimes law- from Pink News- all the latest gay news from the gay community - Pink News
  7. ^ Lowery, George. (30 January 2007) 25 years of gay-rights struggles traced in online exhibit The Cornell Chronicle of Cornell University. Accessed 29 July 2007.
  8. ^ Cornell University Library. 25 Years of Political Influence:The Records of the Human Rights Campaign Cornell University. Accessed 29 July 2007.
  9. ^ Independent Gay Forum - Rudy's Run
  10. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  11. ^ Independent Gay Forum - Whose Agenda?
  12. ^ Sullivan, Andrew. (19 February 2007) The Human Rights Campaign (Blech) The Atlantic Monthly. Accessed 29 July 2007.
  13. ^ HRC hits back at blogger criticisms - Washington Blade
  14. ^ Donor Profiles
  15. ^ Citizen Crain: Cooking the books at HRC
  16. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  17. ^ HRC ‘members’ include all who ever donated $1 - Washington Blade
  18. ^ Kaiser, Charles. (18 July 2000) The D'Amato Factor - Article Brief at findarticles.com The Advocate. Accessed 29 July 2007.
  19. ^ Schindler, Paul. (4 October 2007) HRC Alone in Eschewing No-Compromise Stand Gay City News. Accessed 8 October 2007.
  20. ^ a b Sandeen, Autumn. (6 November 2007) [1] Trans Advocate Blog. Accessed November 9 2007.
  21. ^ Rose, Donna. (3 October 2007) [2]
  22. ^ [3] Pam's House Blend. Accessed 9 November 2007.
  23. ^ John M. Broder (9 December 2004). "Groups Debate Slower Strategy on Gay Rights", New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-24. 
  24. ^ Evelyn Nieves (12 December 2004). "Gay Activists Refuse to Bargain Away Rights", Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-11-24. 
  25. ^ Sen. Mike Gravel: Why I Wasn't Invited to the Debate on Gay Issues - Politics on The Huffington Post
  26. ^ HRC. National Corporate Sponsors Accessed 29 July 2007.

Cornell redirects here. ... The Cornell University Library, the library system of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, which is composed of 20 individual libraries, is one of the largest research libraries in the United States. ... Cornell redirects here. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Human Rights Campaign (official website)
  • Corporate Equality Index
  • Million For Marriage petition
  • The Records of the Human Rights Campaign at the Cornell Library
LGBT (also GLBT) is an acronym referring collectively to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual people. ... Queer studies is the study of issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Sexual identity is a term that, like sex, has two distinctively different meanings. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... For other uses, see Queer (disambiguation). ... Anna P., who lived for many years as a man in Germany, was photographed for Magnus Hirschfelds book Sexual Intermediates in 1922. ... For the electronic music EP by Mr. ... Berdache (from French, from Arabic bardajo meaning kept boy) is a generic term used by some for a third gender (woman-living-man) among many, if not most, Native American tribes. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Bisexual redirects here. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... According to the American Psychological Association, There is no consensus among scientists about the exact reasons that an individual develops a heterosexual, bisexual, gay, or lesbian orientation. ... Homosexuality and psychology have a closely intertwined history. ... // Measuring the prevalence of various sexual orientations is difficult because there is a lack of reliable data. ... The Kinsey scale attempts to measure sexual orientation, from 0 (exclusively heterosexual) to 6 (exclusively homosexual). ... The Klein Sexual Orientation Grid attempts to further measure sexual orientation by expanding upon the earlier Kinsey scale which only considers from 0 (exclusively heterosexual) to 6 (exclusively homosexual). ... Sexual orientation refers to an enduring emotional, romantic, sexual, or affectional attraction toward others,[1] usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Same-sex marriage · LGBT adoption LGBT rights opposition · Heterosexism Violence This box:      This timeline of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history details notable events in the Common Era West. ... For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... Gay Liberation (or Gay Lib) is the name used to describe the radical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered movement of the late 1960s and early to mid 1970s in North America, Western Europe, and Australia and New Zealand. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Stonewall riots were a series of violent conflicts between New York City police officers and groups of gay and transgender people that began during the early... // It is speculated that many men in ancient Greece sought homosexual relationships because of the low intellectual status of women, as in classical Athens. ... According to John Boswell, the 4th century Christian martyrs Saint Sergius and Saint Bacchus were united in the ritual of adelphopoiesis. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Societal attitudes towards homosexuality vary greatly in different cultures and different historical periods, as do attitudes toward sexual desire, activity and relationships in general. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Gender equality Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action... Biphobia is the fear of, discrimination against, or hatred of bisexuals (although in practice it extends to pansexual people too). ... The persecution of gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgendered individuals is the practice of attacking a person, usually physically, because they are or are perceived to be lesbian, gay or transgender. ... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ... Christian minister Fred Phelps, famous in the United States for his churchs anti-homosexuality signs and demonstrations (including picketing funerals). ... Lesbophobia (sometimes Lesbiphobia) is a term which describes prejudice, discrimination, harassment or abuse, either specifically targeting a lesbian person, based on their lesbian identity, or, more generally, targetting lesbians as a class. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and... The relationship between religion and homosexuality varies greatly across time and place, within and between different religions and sects, and regarding different forms of homosexuality and bisexuality. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights LGBT rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Feminism Mens/Fathers rights · Masculinism Children...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gay rights group hailed for election role - The Boston Globe (924 words)
WASHINGTON -- The Human Rights Campaign, one of the nation's leading gay political organizations, played a quiet but pivotal role electing Democrats at the federal and local level in November, a startling turnaround for a group whose demands for gay marriage helped defeat Democratic candidates in 2004, according to party leaders and lawmakers.
Klein is otherwise supportive of gay rights and backs civil unions, but his greatest appeal to the HRC was that his narrow victory over GOP incumbent Representative Clay Shaw helped give the Democrats the numbers they needed to take control of the US House.
At the HRC's urging, state Democratic party officials -- who had been planning just a volunteer phone bank and poll-watching campaign -- paid workers to call voters, knock on doors, and get them to the voting station, according to HRC and party officials.
Scientology Effective Solutions - Raising public awareness of human rights (559 words)
The fundamental premise of human rights, laid down in Article 1 of the Declaration, is that, “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the world’s foremost human rights charter and is the fount from which all modern human rights instruments have sprung, including the European Convention on Human Rights and the more recent Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
Scientologists hold that the rights articulated in the UDHR, if applied broadly, will not only lead to a massive reduction of human rights violations across the world, but will significantly vanquish the simmering resentments that cause racial and religious conflicts — and are used for recruitment by terrorists.
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