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Encyclopedia > Human Rights Act 1998
Human Rights Act 1998
United Kingdom Parliament
Statute book chapter: [1998] (c.42)
Introduced by:
Territorial extent:
Dates
Date of Royal Assent: 9th November 1998
Commencement: 2nd October 2000
Other legislation
Amendments: Sub-s (1): in para (c) words “Article 1 of the Thirteenth Protocol” in square brackets

substituted by SI 2004/1574, art 2(1). Date in force: 22 June 2004: see SI 2004/1574, art 1. Sub-s (4): words “Secretary of State” in square brackets substituted by SI 2003/1887, art 9, Sch 2, para 10(1). Date in force: 19 August 2003: see SI 2003/1887, art 1(2). The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ...

Related legislation: Human Rights Act 1998 (Amendment) Order 2004, SI 2004/1574 (made under sub-s (4)).
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United Kingdom Statutory Instruments

The Human Rights Act 1998 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom which received Royal Assent on November 9, 1998, and mostly came into force on October 2, 2000. Its aim is to "give further effect" in UK law to the rights contained in the European Convention on Human Rights. The Act makes available in UK courts a remedy for breach of a Convention right, without the need to go to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. It also totally abolished the death penalty in UK law (although this was not required by the Convention in force for the UK at that time). This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Acts passed by the Parliament of Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly passed by that body during its existence between 2000 and 2002 when it was suspended. ... This is a list of Measures of the National Assembly for Wales. ... The is a list of Orders in Council for Northern Ireland which are primary legislation for the province when the it is being directly ruled from London and also for those powers not devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Alsace Department Bas-Rhin (67) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg Mayor Fabienne Keller  (UMP) City Statistics Land area¹ 78. ...


In particular, the Act makes it unlawful for any public body to act in a way which is incompatible with the Convention, unless the wording of an Act of Parliament means they have no other choice. It also requires UK judges take account of decisions of the Strasbourg court, and to interpret legislation, as far as possible, in a way which is compatible with the Convention. However, if it is not possible to interpret an Act of Parliament so as to make it compatible with the Convention, the judges are not allowed to override it. All they can do is to issue a declaration of incompatibility. This declaration does not affect the validity of the Act of Parliament: in that way, the Human Rights Act seeks to maintain the principle of Parliamentary sovereignty (see: Constitution of the United Kingdom). An individual can still take his case to the Strasbourg court as a last resort. European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints from Council of Europe member states. ... Parliamentary sovereignty, parliamentary supremacy, or legislative supremacy is a concept in constitutional law that applies to some parliamentary democracies. ... The Constitution of the United Kingdom is uncodified, consisting of both written and unwritten sources. ...

Contents

Jurisdiction

The Human Rights Act applies to all public bodies within the United Kingdom, including central government, local authorities, and bodies exercising public functions. It also includes the Courts. However, it does not include Parliament when it is acting in its legislative capacity. Local governments are administrative offices of an area smaller than a state. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ...


Stronger provisions exist for the devolved Scottish administration under the Scotland Act 1998, which provides that the Scottish Executive and the Scottish Parliament have no power to do anything contrary to the ECHR. The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ...


Rights protection under the Act

The Act provides that it is unlawful for a public authority to act in such a way as to contravene Convention rights.[1] For these purposes public authority includes any other person "whose functions are functions of a public nature."[2] It also explicitly includes the Courts.[3] Convention rights includes only those rights specified in section 1 of the Act (these are recited in full in Schedule 1).[4] In the interpretation of those rights the Act provides that the domestic Courts "may" take into account the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights.[5] European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by...


Section 7 enables any person, with standing, to raise an action against a public authority which has, or proposes to act, in such a Convention contravening manner. A person will have standing to do so provided they would satisfy the "victim test" stipulated by Article 34 of the Convention.[6] This is a more rigorous standard than is ordinarily applied to standing in English, although not Scottish, Judicial Review. Judicial review is the power of a court to review a a law or an official act of a government employee or agent for constitutionality or (in some jurisdictions) for the violation of basic principles of justice. ...


If it is held that the public authority has violated the claimants Convention rights, then the Court is empowered to "grant such relief or remedy, or make such order, within its powers as it considers just and appropriate."[7] This can include an award of damages, although the Act provides additional restrictions on the Court's capacity to make such an award.[8] We dont have an article called Claimants Start this article Search for Claimants in. ... In law, damages refers to the money paid or awarded to a claimant (as it is known in the UK) or plaintiff (in the US) following their successful claim in a civil action. ...


However, the Act also provides a defence for public authorities if their Convention violating act is in pursuance of a mandatory obligation imposed upon them by Westminster primary legislation.[9] The Act envisages that this will ordinarily be a difficult standard to meet though since it requires the Courts to read such legislation (and for that matter subordinate legislation) "So far as it is possible to do so...in a way which is compatible with the Convention rights."[10] Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... Primary legislation is legislation made by the legislative branch of government. ... Delegated legislation (sometimes referred to as secondary legislation or subordinate legislation) is law made by ministers under powers given to them by parliamentary acts (primary legislation) in order to implement and administer the requirements of the acts. ...


Where it is impossible to read primary legislation in a Convention compliant manner, the only sanction available to the Courts is to make a Declaration of Incompatibility in respect of it.[11] The power to do so is restricted to the higher Courts.[12] Such a Declaration has no impact upon the continuing force of the legislation[13] but it is likely to produce public pressure upon the government to remove the incompatibility. It also strengthens the case of a claimant armed with such a decision from the domestic Courts in any subsequent appeal to Strasbourg. In order to provide swift compliance with the Convention the Act allows Ministers to take remedial action to amend even offending primary legislation via subordinate legislation.[14] European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Delegated legislation (sometimes referred to as secondary legislation or subordinate legislation) is law made by ministers under powers given to them by parliamentary acts (primary legislation) in order to implement and administer the requirements of the acts. ...


Repeal of the death penalty

The act (s. 21(5)) completely repealed the death penalty in the United Kingdom, effective on Royal Assent. Previously to this, the death penalty had already been abolished for murder, but it remained in force for certain military offences (although these provisions had not been used for several decades). The death penalty for treason was abolished by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament. ...


Note that this provision was not required by the European Convention (protocol 6 permits the death penalty for certain military offences; protocol 13, which prohibits the death penalty for all circumstances did not then exist); rather, the government introduced s. 21(5) as a late amendment in response to parliamentary pressure.


Well-known cases involving the Human Rights Act

The first case invoking the act was brought by The Times in October 2000 which sought to overturn a libel ruling against the newspaper involving the Lee Clegg murder case. The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... rffffff This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: patent nonsense If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...


Naomi Campbell and Sara Cox both sought to assert their right to privacy under the act. Both cases were successful for the complainant (Campbell's on the second attempt)(Cox's attempt was not judicially decided but an out of court settlement was reached before the issue could be tested in court) and an amendment to British law to incorporate a provision for privacy is expected to be introduced. Naomi Campbell (born May 22, 1970) is an English supermodel, actress, singer and author. ... Sara Cox Michelle Sara Cox (born Friday December 13, 1974), affectionately known as Coxy, is an English television and radio personality and presenter. ...


The James Bulger murder case tested whether the Home Secretary, a politician, was the right person to have the final say on the length of life sentences, or whether this infringed the perpetrators' right to a fair trial. The European Court found on the side of Bulger's killers Jon Venables and Robert Thompson. The 2003 Criminal Justice Act removed much of the power to set sentences previously held by the Home Secretary. For the American wanted by the FBI for murder, see James J. Bulger. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... In the government of the United Kingdom, Criminal Justice Acts is a generic name for those acts of parliament that shape law and order in the country. ...


On December 16, 2004, the House of Lords held in A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department that Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001, under whose powers a number of non-UK nationals were detained in Belmarsh Prison, was incompatible with the Human Rights Act. This precipitated the enactment of the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 to replace Part 4 of the 2001 Act. December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... The Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 or ATCSA is a British Act of Parliament introduced as emergency legislation after the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York. ... HM Prison Belmarsh is a high security prison in London, England. ... The Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 is a British Act of Parliament intended to deal with the Law Lords ruling of 16 December 2004, that the detention without trial of nine foreigners at HM Prison Belmarsh under Part IV of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 was unlawful...


In 2000, Amesh Chauhan and Dean Hollingsworth were photographed by a speed camera. As is standard practice for those caught in this way, they were sent a form by the police asking them to identify who was driving the vehicle at the time. They protested under the Human Rights Act, arguing that they could not be required to give evidence against themselves. An initial judgment, by Judge Peter Crawford at Birmingham Crown Court, ruled in their favour but this was later reversed. A red-light camera in use in Beaverton, Oregon A road-rule enforcement camera is a system including a camera and a vehicle-monitoring device used to detect and identify vehicles disobeying a road rule or road rules. ...


On March 16, 2005 the Court of Appeal upheld a High Court ruling that Leeds City Council could not infringe the right to a home of a Roma family, the Maloneys, by evicting them from public land. The court however referred the case to the House of Lords as this decision conflicted with a ruling from the European Court of Human Rights.[2] March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system, with only the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords above it. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Roma (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by...


In March of 2006, the High Court in London ruled against a hospital's bid to turn off the ventilator that kept the child, known as Baby MB, alive. The 19-month-old baby has genetic condition spinal muscular atrophy - which leads to almost total paralysis. The parents of the child fought for his right to life, despite claims from medics that the invasive ventilation could be living an 'intolerable life'.


The judgment given by the European Court of Human Rights in Connors v. UK declared that travellers who had their licences to live on local authority owned land suddenly revoked had been discriminated against compared to the treatment of mobile-home owners who did not belong to the traveller population and thus their Article 14 (protection from discrimination) and Article 8 (right to respect for the home) had been infringed. However, there has never been a case where the Act has been successfully invoked to allow travellers to remain on greenbelt land and indeed the prospects of this ever happening seem highly unlikely after the House of Lords decision in Price v Leeds City Council which severely restricted the occasions on which Article 8 may be invoked to protect someone from eviction in the absence of some legal right over the land. European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by... Irish Travellers are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


In May 2006, a politically controversial decision regarding the treatment of 9 Afghan men (see more details under Afghan hijackers case 2006) who hijacked a plane to flee from the Taliban, caused widespread condemnation by many tabloid newspapers (most notably The Sun), the broadsheets and the leaders of both the Labour Party and the Conservative Party. It was ruled by an Immigration Tribunal, under the Human Rights Act, that the hijackers could remain in the United Kingdom; a subsequent court decision ruled that the government had abused its power in restricting the hijackers' right to work. The Afghan hijackers case, in 2006, was a United Kingdom judicial case that provoked widespread political controversy and was questioned by large sections of the media, causing widespread condemnation by many newspapers (most notably The Sun)[1], and the leaders of both the Labour Party and the Conservative Party. ... Look up sun in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ...


Political context that led to the passage of the Human Rights Act

When John Major's Conservative government was removed from office after a landslide victory of Labour in the 1997 parliamentary elections, the newly formed government under Tony Blair kept its manifesto promise and incorporated the European Convention on Human Rights into law through the Human Rights Act 1998. Sir John Major, KG, CH, PC (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... The UK general election, 1997 was one of the largest election victories in the history of the twentieth century. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Look up manifesto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ...


As the 1997 white paper "Rights Brought Home" stated: "It takes on average five years to get an action into the European Court of Human Rights once all domestic remedies have been exhausted; and it costs an average of £30,000. Bringing these rights home will mean that the British people will be able to argue for their rights in the British courts - without this inordinate delay and cost". European Court of Human Rights building in Strasbourg The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), often referred to informally as the Strasbourg Court, was created to systematise the hearing of human rights complaints against States Parties to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by...


The Conservatives had historically been unwilling to incorporate these rights into domestic law. Partly because it felt the common law provided sufficient protection for the rights and freedom of citizens and partly because legal systems in the British colonies did not comply with international human rights standards. This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...


During the campaign for the 2005 parliamentary elections the Conservatives under Michael Howard vowed to "overhaul or scrap" the Human Rights Act. According to him "the time had come to liberate the nation from the avalanche of political correctness, costly litigation, feeble justice, and culture of compensation running riot in Britain today and warning that the politically correct regime ushered in by Labour's enthusiastic adoption of human rights legislation has turned the age-old principle of fairness on its head".[citation needed] The Rt Hon. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ...


He cited a number of examples of how the Human Rights Act had failed: "the schoolboy arsonist allowed back into the classroom because enforcing discipline apparently denied his right to education;[citation needed] the convicted rapist given £4000 compensation because his second appeal was delayed;[citation needed] the burglar given taxpayers' money to sue the man whose house he broke into;[citation needed] travellers who thumb their nose at the law allowed to stay on green belt sites they have occupied in defiance of planning laws;[citation needed] and a convicted serial killer allowed hard core porn in prison because of his right to information and freedom of expression".[citation needed] Categories: Crimes | Stub ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rape. ... In law, an appeal is a process for making a formal challenge to an official decision. ... For other uses of the word Greenbelt, see Greenbelt (disambiguation). ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... A work in progress by Sarbajit Roy ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ...


Some commentators have criticised Howard's claim that a prisoner serving a life sentence was allowed to obtain hard-core pornography in prison.[attribution needed] In R (on the application of Morton) v Governor of Long Lartin Prison, a prisoner did indeed seek judicial review of a prison governor's decision to deny him access to hard-core pornography claiming that the governor's policy was a breach of his Article 10 right to freedom of expression; however, the claim was actually rejected. Pornographic movies Pornography (Porn) (from Greek πόρνη (porne) prostitute and γραφή (grafe) writing), more informally referred to as porn or porno, is the explicit representation of the human body or sexual activity with the goal of sexual arousal. ...


Howard's successor as Leader of the Opposition, David Cameron, has also vowed to scrap the Human Rights Act if he is elected, instead replacing it with a 'Bill of Rights' for Britain.[15]. The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is the Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom, positions he has occupied since December 2005. ...


In 2007, the human rights organisation JUSTICE released a discussion paper entitled 'A Bill of Rights for Britain?', examining the case for updating the Human Rights Act with an entrenched Bill [3]. J.L. Urban, statue of Lady Justice at court building in Olomouc, Czech Republic Justice concerns the proper ordering of things and persons within a society. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Section 6(1)
  2. ^ Section 6(3)(b)
  3. ^ Section 6(3)(a)
  4. ^ The full text of Schedule 1 (along with that of the rest of the Act) can be found at the Office of Public Sector Information Website: [1]
  5. ^ Section 2
  6. ^ Section 7(7)
  7. ^ Section 8(1)
  8. ^ Cf. sections 8(2)-(5) and Section 9(2)-(3) which provides additional protection to the Courts.
  9. ^ Section 6(2).
  10. ^ Section 3(1)
  11. ^ Section 4
  12. ^ Section 4(5) provides that a Declaration of Incompatibility can be made by: the House of Lords, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland by the Court of Appeal or the High Court. And in Scotland by the High Court of Justiciary, when not sitting as a trial court, or the Court of Session. The power is also available to the Courts-Martial Appeal Court.
  13. ^ Section 4(6)(a)
  14. ^ Section 10(2)
  15. ^ Cameron 'could scrap' rights act. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.

The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... Seal of the High Court of Justiciary © Crown Copyright The High Court of Justiciary is Scotlands supreme criminal court. ... A trial court or court of first instance is the court in which most civil or criminal cases begin. ... The Court of Session is the supreme civil court in Scotland. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The United Kingdom has a long and established tradition of respect for its citizens human rights. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ...

External links

  • Text of the Act from Her Majesty's Stationery Office
  • RIGHTS BROUGHT HOME: Government white paper
  • Human Rights Act 1998 Leaflet with detailed information from Community Legal Service Direct.
  • The Human Rights Act - Exploding the Myths by Liberty

  Results from FactBites:
 
One Country (1351 words)
LONDON — Although recognized as a fundamental human right by nearly every nation, the freedom of religion or belief is woefully under-enforced by many governments and deserves more attention, said participants at a recent Parliamentary seminar here.
Although it has often been relegated to second-class status among human rights concerns, the issue of freedom of religion or belief today stands at the center of many of our most pressing global challenges.
Human Rights, the UN and the Bahá'ís in Iran -- by Nazila Ghanea -- The coming of the new millennium has also brought a surprising upsurge in religious feeling around the world.
Human Rights Act 1998 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1505 words)
The Human Rights Act 1998 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament which received Royal Assent on November 9, 1998, and came into force on October 2, 2000.
The death penalty for treason was abolished by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998.
The James Bulger murder case tested whether the Home Secretary, a politician, was the right person to have the final say on the length of life sentences, or whether this infringed the perpertrators' right to a fair trial.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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