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Encyclopedia > Hulk (comics)
The Hulk

Variant cover art for The Incredible Hulk vol. 3, #92 (April 2006)
by Bryan Hitch.
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance The Incredible Hulk #1 (May 1962)
Created by Stan Lee
Jack Kirby
In story information
Alter ego Robert Bruce Banner
Team affiliations Warbound
Avengers
Defenders
Pantheon
Hulkbusters (Banner)
Notable aliases Joe Fixit, The Green Scar, War
Abilities Superhuman strength, stamina, and durability
Regenerative healing factor
Genius level intellect in certain incarnations

The Hulk is a fictional character that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character first appeared in The Incredible Hulk #1 (May 1962), and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. After physicist Dr. Robert Bruce Banner was caught in the blast of a gamma bomb he created, he was transformed into the Hulk, a giant, raging monster. The character, both as Banner and the Hulk, is frequently pursued by the police or the armed forces, often as a result of the destruction he causes. While the coloration of the character's skin varies during the course of its publication history, the Hulk is most often depicted as green. Hulk is one of Marvel Comics' most recognized characters. This article is about the live action series. ... For the 2003 film, see Hulk (film). ... Look up Hulk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hulk may refer to: Hulk (comics), a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe Hulk (film), a 2003 film based on the comic book character, directed by Ang Lee Hulk (ship), a type of ships Hulk (roller coaster), a roller coaster... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (600 × 900 pixel, file size: 475 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a publivty image that can be found at comics. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... The Warbound are a group of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Defenders are a Marvel Comics superhero group — usually presented as a non-team of individualistic outsiders each known for following their own agendas — that usually battles mystic and supernatural threats. ... The Pantheon is a fictional organization appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Hulkbusters is the name of three fictional organizations in the Marvel Universe. ... The Horsemen of Apocalypse are a team of fictional supervillains in the Marvel Universe that serve the ancient mutant Apocalypse as his personal strikeforce. ... This is a listing of powers and abilities possessed by the Hulk, a fictional comic book superhero from the Marvel Comics universe. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see May (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ...


The character has appeared in a television series, with spin-off television movies, starring Bill Bixby as Dr. Banner and Lou Ferrigno as the Hulk; in animated series in 1966, 1982 and 1996; and in two feature films: Hulk (2003), directed by Ang Lee and starring Eric Bana as Banner, and The Incredible Hulk (2008) directed by Louis Leterrier and starring Edward Norton as Banner. This article is about the live action series. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951)[1] is an American bodybuilder and actor. ... The Incredible Hulk was an American animated television series based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. ... In 1996, UPN brought Marvel Comics Hulk back to animated form (his last animated series was in 1982 for NBC). ... For the 2008 film, see The Incredible Hulk (film). ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Li (李) Ang Lee (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy Award-winning film director from Taiwan. ... Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... For the 2003 film, see Hulk (film). ... Louis Leterrier (born June 17, 1973 in Paris, France) is a Hollywood film director whose most notable films include The Transporter and Transporter 2, starring Jason Statham, as well as Danny the Dog, a thriller starring Jet Li and Morgan Freeman. ... Ed Norton redirects here. ...

Contents

Publication history

Debut and first series

The Incredible Hulk #1 (May 1962). Cover art by Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman.
The Incredible Hulk #1 (May 1962). Cover art by Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman.

The Hulk debuted in The Incredible Hulk #1 (May 1962), by writer Stan Lee, penciller and co-plotter Jack Kirby, and inker Paul Reinman. In the first issue, the Hulk was grey. Writer and Marvel editor-in-chief Lee had wanted a color that did not suggest any particular ethnic group.[1] Colorist Stan Goldberg, however, had problems with the grey coloring, resulting in different shades of grey, and even green, in the issue. Stan Lee picked the uncommon color, green. From issue #2 (July 1962) on, Goldberg colored the big brute's skin green.[2] Green was used in retellings of the origin, even to the point of reprints of the original story being re-colored, for the next two decades. The Incredible Hulk vol. 2, #302 (Dec. 1984), reintroduced the grey Hulk in flashbacks set close to the origin story. This was reaffirmed in vol. 2, #318 (April 1986), which showed the Hulk was grey at the time of his creation. Since then, reprints of the first issue have displayed the original grey coloring. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (533x800, 411 KB) Cover, The Incredible Hulk #1 Marvel Comics (May, 1962) art by Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman Source: http://scoop. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (533x800, 411 KB) Cover, The Incredible Hulk #1 Marvel Comics (May, 1962) art by Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman Source: http://scoop. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Paul Reinman is an American comic book artist (born 1910, Germany) best known as one of Jack Kirbys Silver Age inkers, including on the first issues of The Incredible Hulk and The Uncanny X-Men. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... Stan Goldberg a. ...


The original series was canceled after six issues, with the finale cover-dated March 1963. Lee had written each story, with Kirby penciling the first five issues and Steve Ditko penciling and inking the sixth. The character immediately guest-starred in Fantastic Four #12 (March 1963), and months later became a founding member of the Avengers appearing in just the first two issues of that superhero team's eponymous series (Sept. & Nov. 1963), and returning as an antagonist in issues #3 and #5 (Jan. & May 1964). He then guest-starred in The Amazing Spider-Man #14 (July 1964). Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ...


Around this time, co-creator Jack Kirby received a letter from a college dormitory stating the Hulk had been chosen as its official mascot.[3] Kirby and Lee realized their character had found an audience in college-age readers.


Tales to Astonish

Tales to Astonish #60 (Oct. 1964). Cover art by Jack Kirby and Sol Brodsky.
Tales to Astonish #60 (Oct. 1964). Cover art by Jack Kirby and Sol Brodsky.

A year and a half after the series was canceled, the Hulk became the backup feature in Tales to Astonish in issue #60 (Oct. 1964). In the previous issue, he appeared as the antagonist for Giant-Man, star of the book. These new stories were initially scripted by Lee and illustrated by the team of penciller Steve Ditko and inker George Roussos. Other artists later in this run included Jack Kirby from #68-84 (June 1965 - Oct. 1966), doing full pencils or, more often, layouts for other artists; Gil Kane, credited as "Scott Edwards", in #76 (Feb. 1966); Bill Everett (inking Kirby, #78-84 (April-Oct. 1966)); and John Buscema. Marie Severin finished out the Hulk’s run in Tales to Astonish; beginning with issue #102 (Apr. 1968) the book was retitled The Incredible Hulk, and ran until March 1999, when Marvel canceled the series, and then restarted the title with a new issue #1. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sol Brodsky (born c. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Yellowjacket. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... George Roussos a. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Bill Everett (May 18, 1917 – February 27, 1973) was a comic book writer/illustrator most famous for the creation of Namor the Sub-Mariner and co-creating Daredevil for Marvel Comics. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... Cover to Sub-Mariner #9 . ...


This run of stories introduced readers to recurring villains such as the Leader, who would become the Hulk's arch-nemesis,[4] and the Abomination, another gamma-irradiated being, but stronger than the Hulk.[4] In issue #77 (March 1966), the Hulk's identity became publicly known. The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ... The Abomination is a fictional character that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


1970s

The Incredible Hulk was published through the 1970s and also made guest appearances in other titles. In 1977, following the debut of the eponymous television series, Marvel launched a second title, The Rampaging Hulk, a comics magazine targeted to the show's audience.[4] Writers also introduced Banner’s cousin Jennifer Walters, the She-Hulk, who was featured in a title of her own. Banner gave some of his blood to Walters in a transfusion, and the gamma radiation affected her, but she maintained most of her intellect. Banner’s guilt about causing her change became another part of his character. She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ...


Writers changed numerous times during the decade. At times, the creative staff included Archie Goodwin, Chris Claremont, and Tony Isabella, Len Wein handled many of the stories through the 1970s, working first with Herb Trimpe, then in 1975, with Sal Buscema, who was the regular artist for 10 years. Harlan Ellison plotted a story, scripted by Roy Thomas, for issue #140 (Jun 1971), "The Brute that Shouted Love at the Heart of the Atom". Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Tony Isabella (born December 22, 1951) is an American comic book writer and commentator, best known as the creator and writer of Black Lightning, DC Comics first major African American superhero. ... The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. ... Cover to Avengers Annual #17. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ...


1980s and 1990s

Following Roger Stern, Bill Mantlo took over the writing with issue #245 (March 1980). His Crossroads of Eternity stories, which ran from issue #300 (Oct. 1984) to #313 (Nov. 1985), explored the idea that Banner had suffered child abuse. Greg Pak, a later writer on The Incredible Hulk volume 2, called Mantlo's Crossroads stories one of his biggest influences on approaching the character.[5] After five years, Mantlo and artist Mike Mignola left the title for Alpha Flight,[6] and writer John Byrne worked on the series, followed briefly by Al Milgrom, before new regular writer Peter David took over. The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... Bill Mantlo (born November 9,[1] 1951) is an American comic-book writer, primarily at Marvel Comics, and an attorney, best-known for his work on two licensed toy properties whose adventures occurred in the Marvel Universe: the Eagle Award-winning Micronauts and the long-running Rom. ... Child abuse is the physical, psychological or sexual abuse or neglect of children. ... Greg Pak is a New York-based film director / comic book writer. ... Mike Mignola (born in Berkeley, California on September 16, 1960) is a American comic book artist and writer. ... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Cover to West Coast Avengers #1, Art by Milgrom Allen Al Milgrom is an American comic book writer, penciller, inker and editor. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ...


David became the writer of the series with issue #331 (May 1987), marking the start of a 12-year tenure. David's run altered Banner's pre-Hulk characterization and the nature of Banner and the Hulk's relationship. David returned to the Stern and Mantlo abuse storylines, expanding the damage caused, and depicting Banner as suffering dissociative identity disorder (DID). David's stories showed that Banner had serious mental problems long before he became the Hulk. David revamped his personality significantly, giving the Grey Hulk the alias 'Joe Fixit', and setting him up as a morally ambiguous Vegas enforcer and tough guy. David worked with numerous artists over his run on the series, including Dale Keown, Todd McFarlane, Gary Frank, Liam Sharp, Terry Dodson, Mike Deodato, Jr., George Pérez, and Adam Kubert.[4]. Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), as defined by the American Psychiatric Associations Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), is a mental condition whereby a single individual evidences two or more distinct identities or personalities, each with its own pattern of perceiving and interacting with the environment. ... Look up Hulk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hulk may refer to: Hulk (comics), a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe Hulk (film), a 2003 film based on the comic book character, directed by Ang Lee Hulk (ship), a type of ships Hulk (roller coaster), a roller coaster... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... Dale Keown is a Canadian comic book artist. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... Comic book artist, notable for his work with J. Michael Straczynski on Midnight Nation and Supreme Power. ... Liam Sharp is an artist currently illustrating the comic Testament. ... Terrence Terry Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller. ... Artist Mike Deodato Jr. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #377; Art by Adam Kubert. ...


In issue #377 (Jan 1991), David revamped the Hulk again, using a storyline involving hypnosis to have the splintered personalities of Banner and Hulk synthesize into a new Hulk who has the vast power of the Savage Hulk, the cunning of the Grey Hulk, and the intelligence of Bruce Banner.


In the 1993 Future Imperfect miniseries, writer David and penciller George Pérez introduced readers to the Hulk of a dystopian future. Calling himself the Maestro, the Hulk rules over a world where most of the heroes have been killed, and only Rick Jones and a small band of rebels fight against The Maestro’s rule. Although The Maestro seemed to be destroyed by the end, he returned in The Incredible Hulk #460 (Jan 1998), also written by David. A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ...


In 1998, David followed editor Bobbie Chase's suggestion to kill Betty Ross. In the introduction to the Hulk trade paperback Beauty and the Behemoth, David said that his wife had recently left him, providing inspiration for the storyline. Marvel executives used Ross' death as an opportunity to push the idea of bringing back the Savage Hulk. David disagreed, leading to his parting ways with Marvel.[7] His last issue of Hulk was #467 (Aug 1998), his 137th.


Also in 1998, Marvel relaunched The Rampaging Hulk, this time as a standard comic book rather than as a comics magazine.


Relaunch

Following David's departure, Joe Casey took over as writer though the series' relaunch after issue #474 (March 1999). Hulk vol. 2[8] began immediately the following month, scripted by John Byrne and penciled by Ron Garney. Byrne departed before the first year was over, citing creative differences.[9] Erik Larsen and Jerry Ordway briefly filled scripting duties in his place, and the title returned to The Incredible Hulk vol. 3[10] with the arrival of Paul Jenkins in issue #12 (March 2000). Joe Casey is an American comic book writer. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Ron Garney is a comic book artist. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Paul Jenkins, British comic-book writer Paul Jenkins (born 1923), U.S. abstract Expressionist painter This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Jenkins wrote a story arc in which Banner and the three Hulks (Savage Hulk, Grey Hulk, and the Merged Hulk, now considered a separate personality and referred to as the Professor) are able to mentally interact with one another, each personality taking over their shared body. During this, the four personalities (including Banner) confront yet another submerged Hulk, a sadistic Hulk intent on attacking the world for revenge.[11] Jenkins also created John Ryker in issue #14 (May 2000), a ruthless military general in charge of the original gamma bomb test responsible for the Hulk's creation, and who plans to create similar creatures. Ryker's actions briefly result in Banner becoming the sadistic Hulk before the four other personae subdue the beast. General John Ryker is one of the Hulks enemies. ...


Bruce Jones followed as the series' writer, and his run features Banner using yoga to take control of the Hulk while he is pursued by a secret conspiracy and aided by the mysterious Mr. Blue. Jones appended his 43-issue Incredible Hulk run with the limited series Hulk/Thing: Hard Knocks #1-4 (Nov. 2004 - Feb. 2005) , which Marvel published after putting the ongoing series on hiatus. Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... For other uses such as Yoga postures, see Yoga (disambiguation) Statue of Shiva performing Yogic meditation Yoga (Sanskrit: योग Yog, IPA: ) is a group of ancient spiritual practices designed for the purpose of cultivating a steady mind. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


Peter David, who had initially signed a contract for the six-issue Tempest Fugit limited series, returned as writer when it was decided to make the story, now only five parts, part of the ongoing series instead.[12] David contracted to complete a year on the title. Tempest Fugit revealed that Nightmare has manipulated the Hulk for years, tormenting him in various ways for "inconveniences" that the Hulk had caused him, including the sadistic Hulk Jenkins had introduced.[13] After a four-part tie-in to the House of M crossover and a one-issue epilogue, David left the series once more, citing the need to do non-Hulk work for his career's sake.[14] Dr Strange rescuing a victim of Nightmare. ... House of M was an eight-part comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2005. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... An epilogue, or epilog, is a piece of writing at the end of a work of literature or drama, usually used to bring closure to the work. ...


Planet Hulk and World War Hulk

Main article: World War Hulk
Promotional art for World War Hulk #1 by David Finch.
Promotional art for World War Hulk #1 by David Finch.

In the 2006 crossover storyline "Planet Hulk" by writer Greg Pak, a secret group of superhero leaders, the Illuminati, consider the Hulk an unacceptable potential risk to Earth, and rocket him into space to live a peaceful existence on a planet uninhabited by intelligent life. After a trajectory malfunction, the Hulk crashes on the violent planet Sakaar. Weakened by his journey, he is captured and eventually becomes a gladiator who scars the face of Sakaar's tyrannical emperor. The Hulk becomes a rebel leader and later usurps Sakaar's throne through combat with the red king and his armies. World War Hulk is a comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2007, featuring the Hulk. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... World War Hulk is a comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2007, featuring the Hulk. ... David Finch is a Canadian-born comic book artist who got his start working for Top Cow Productions. ... Greg Pak is a New York-based film director / comic book writer. ... The Illuminati are a fictional group of superheroes who joined forces and secretly work behind the scenes in the Marvel Universe. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


After Hulk's rise to emperor, the vessel used to send Hulk to Sakaar explodes, killing millions in Sakaar's capital, including his pregnant queen, Caiera. The damage to the tectonic plates destroys the planet and kills most of its population. Caiera is a character in the Marvel ComicsUniverse, created during the Planet Hulk storyline. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ...


The Hulk, enraged, returns to Earth with the remnants of Sakaar's citizens, and his allies, the Warbound, seeking retribution against the Illuminati. After laying siege to Manhattan, New York City, the Hulk learns one of his allies was responsible for the explosion. He reverts to his Bruce Banner form and is taken into S.H.I.E.L.D. custody. The Warbound are a group of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... S.H.I.E.L.D. is a fictional, comic-book counterterrorism and intelligence agency in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Retitling and new Hulk series

As of #113 (Feb. 2008), the series was retitled The Incredible Hercules, still written by Greg Pak but starring the mythological demigod Hercules and teenaged genius Amadeus Cho. For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... The term demigod, meaning half-god, is a modern distinction, often misapplied in Greek mythology. ... Hercules (Heracles) is a fictional character, an Olympian demigod and superhero in the Marvel Comics Universe, based on the mythological demigod and hero called Heracles by the Greeks and Hercules by the Romans. ... This article is about the World War Hulk character Amadeus Cho. ...


Marvel also launched a new volume of Hulk, written by Jeph Loeb and drawn by Ed McGuiness. The series opens with an investigation into the appearance of a new Hulk; a Red Hulk, and reveals that Bruce Banner is no longer comatose, and is imprisoned by the US military until he escapes and confronts the Red Hulk. Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ... Power Girl from Superman/Batman #4 (2004). ...


Characterization

Bruce Banner

The core of the Hulk, Bruce Banner has been portrayed differently by different writers, but common themes persist. Banner is a genius but emotionally withdrawn in most fashions.[4] Banner designed the gamma bomb which causes his affliction, and the ironic twist of his self-inflicted fate has been one of the most persistent common themes.[3] Arie Kaplan describes the character thus: “Bruce Banner lives in a constant state of panic, always wary that the monster inside him will erupt, and therefore he can’t form meaningful bonds with anyone.” [15] A genius is a person of great intelligence. ...


Throughout the Hulk's published history, writers have continued to frame Bruce Banner in these themes. Under different writers, his fractured personality led to transformations into different versions of the Hulk. These transformations are usually involuntary, and often writers have tied the transformation to emotional triggers, such as rage and fear. As the series has progressed, different writers have adapted the Hulk, changing Hulk's personality to reflect changes in Banner's physiology or psyche. Writers have also refined and changed some aspects of Banner's personality, showing him as emotionally repressed, but capable of deep love for Betty Ross, and for solving problems posed to him. Under the writing of Paul Jenkins, Banner was shown to be a capable fugitive, applying deductive reasoning and observation to figure out the events transpiring around him. When Banner has controlled the Hulk's body, he has applied principles of physics to problems and challenges and used deductive reasoning.


The Hulk

During the experimental detonation of a gamma bomb, scientist Bruce Banner rushes to save a teenager who has driven onto the testing field. Pushing the teen, Rick Jones, into a trench, Banner himself is caught in the blast, absorbing massive amounts of radiation. He awakens later in an infirmary, seeming relatively unscathed, but that night transforms into a lumbering grey form that breaks through the wall and escapes. A soldier in the ensuing search party dubs the otherwise unidentified creature a "hulk".[16]


The original version of the Hulk was often shown as simple and quick to anger. His first transformations were triggered by sundown, and his return to Banner by dawn, however in Incredible Hulk #4, Banner started using a Gamma ray device to transform at will.[17] In more recent Hulk stories, emotions trigger the change. Although grey in his debut, difficulties for the printer led to a change in his color to green. In the origin tale, the Hulk divorces his identity from Banner’s, decrying Banner as "that puny weakling in the picture".[16] From his earliest stories, the Hulk has been concerned with finding sanctuary and quiet,[3] and often is shown reacting emotionally to situations quickly. Grest and Weinberg call Hulk the "...dark, primordial side of [Banner's] psyche."[18]. Even in the earliest appearances, Hulk spoke in the third person. The Hulk retains a modest intelligence, thinking and talking in full sentences, and Lee even gives the Hulk expository dialogue in issue six, allowing readers to learn just what capabilities the Hulk has, when the Hulk says, “But these muscles ain't just for show! All I gotta do is spring up and just keep goin'!" In Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World's Greatest Comics, Les Daniels addresses the Hulk as an embodiment of cultural fears of radiation and nuclear science. He quotes Jack Kirby thus: "As long as we're experimenting with radioactivity there's no telling what may happen, or how much our advancements may cost us." Daniels continues "The Hulk became Marvel's most disturbing embodiment of the perils inherent in the atomic age."[19]


Though usually a loner, the Hulk helped to form both the Avengers[20] and the Defenders.[21] He was able to determine that the changes were now triggered by emotional stress.[22] The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Defenders are a Marvel Comics superhero group — usually presented as a non-team of individualistic outsiders each known for following their own agendas — that usually battles mystic and supernatural threats. ...


Fantastic Four #12 (March 1963), featured the Hulk's first battle with the Thing. Although many early Hulk stories involve General Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross trying to capture or destroy the Hulk, the main villain is often, like Hulk, a radiation based character, like the Gargoyle or the Leader, along with other foes such as the Toad Men, or Asian warlord General Fang. Ross' daughter, Betty, loves Banner and criticizes her father for pursuing the Hulk. General Ross' right-hand man, Major Glenn Talbot, also loves Betty and is torn between pursuing the Hulk and trying to gain Betty's love more honorably. Rick Jones serves as the Hulk's friend and sidekick in these early tales. This article is about the superheroes. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... General Thaddeus E. Thunderbolt Ross is a fictional character of Marvel Comics. ... Gargoyle is a name shared by two fictional characters appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ... Betty Ross (later Betty Talbot and then Betty Banner) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Major (later Colonel) Glenn Talbot is a fictional character and an armed-villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Stan Lee and others have compared The Hulk in these early tales to the misunderstood creature Frankenstein's Monster[3], a concept Lee had wanted to explore. Lee also compared Hulk to the Golem of Jewish myth. [3] In The Science of Superheroes, Gresh and Weinberg see the Hulk as a reaction to the Cold War [18] and the threat of nuclear attack, an interpretation shared by Weinstein in Up, Up, and Oy Vey.[3] Kaplan calls Hulk ‘schizophrenic’.[15] Jack Kirby has also commented upon his influences in drawing the character, recalling as inspiration the tale of a mother who rescues her child who is trapped beneath a car. [23] For other uses, see Golem (disambiguation). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


In the 1970s, Hulk was shown as more prone to anger and rage, and less talkative. Writers played with the nature of his transformations,[24] briefly giving Banner control over the change, and the ability to maintain control of his Hulk form.


Hulk stories began to involve other dimensions, and in one, Hulk met the empress Jarella. Jarella used magic to bring Banner’s intelligence to Hulk, and came to love him, asking him to become her mate. Though Hulk returned to Earth before he could become her king, he would return to Jarella's kingdom of K'ai again. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


When Bill Mantlo took on writing duties, he led the character into the arena of political commentary when Hulk traveled to Tel Aviv, Israel, encountering both the violence of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the Jewish Israeli heroine Sabra. Soon after, Hulk encountered the Arabian Knight, a Bedouin superhero.[3] Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Sabra (Ruth Bat-Seraph) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Arabian Knight (real name Abdul Qamar) is a Saudi Arabian super hero in the Marvel Comics universe who debuted in The Incredible Hulk #257. ... A Bedouin man in Sinai Peninsula The Bedouin, (from the Arabic (), pl. ...


Under Mantlo's writing, a mindless Hulk was sent to the "Crossroads of Eternity", where Banner was revealed to have suffered childhood traumas which engendered Bruce's repressed rage.[25]


Having come to terms with his issues, at least for a time, Hulk and Banner physically separated under John Byrne's writing. Separated from the Hulk by Doc Samson,[26] Banner was recruited by the U.S. government to create the Hulkbusters, a government team dedicated to catching Hulk. Banner and Ross married,[27] but Byrne's change in the character was reversed by Al Milgrom, who reunited the two personas,[28] and with issue #324, returned the Hulk to his grey coloration after a second visit to K'ai and his one time love, Jarella. Doc Samson (Dr. Leonard Samson) is a fictional character, a superhero and psychiatrist in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Shortly after returning to Earth, Hulk took on the identity of "Joe Fixit," a shadowy behind the scenes figure, working in Las Vegas on behalf of a crooked casino owner, Michael Berengetti.[29] For months, Banner was repressed in Hulk’s mind, but slowly began to reappear. Hulk and Banner began to change back and forth again at dusk and dawn, as the character initially had, but this time, they worked together to advance both their goals, using written notes as communication. In The Incredible Hulk #333, the Leader describes the Grey Hulk persona as strongest during the night of the new moon and weakest during the full moon. Eventually, the green Hulk began to re-emerge.[30] The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ...


In issue #377, David revamped the Hulk again. Doctor Leonard Samson engages the Ringmaster's services to hypnotize Bruce Banner and force him, the Savage Hulk (Green Hulk) and Mr. Fixit (Grey Hulk) to confront Banner's past abuse at the hands of his father, Brian Banner. During the session, the three identities confront a ‘Guilt Hulk’, which sadistically torments the three with the abuse of Banner’s father. Facing down this abuse, a new, larger and smarter Hulk emerges and completely replaces the "human" Bruce Banner and Hulk personae. This Hulk is a culmination of the three aspects of Banner. He has the vast power of the Savage Hulk, the cunning of the grey Hulk and the intelligence of Bruce Banner. The Ringmaster (real name Maynard Tiboldt) is a fictional supervillain who is featured in Marvel Comics. ...


Peter David then introduces the Hulk to the Pantheon, a secretive organization built around an extended family of super-powered people.[31] The family members, mostly distant cousins to each other, had codenames based in the mythos of the Trojan War, and were descendants of the founder of the group, Agamemnon. When Agamemnon leaves, he puts the Hulk in charge of the organization. The storyline ends when it is revealed Agamemnon has traded his offspring to an alien race to gain power. The Hulk leads the Pantheon against the aliens, and then moves on. The Pantheon is a fictional organization appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... The Pantheon is a fictional organization appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


Shortly after, Hulk encounters a depraved version of himself from the future, called Maestro. Thrown into the future, Hulk finds himself allied with Rick Jones, now an old man, in an effort to destroy the tyrant Maestro. Unable to stop him in any other manner, Hulk uses the time machine that brought him to the future to send the Maestro back into the heart of the very Gamma Bomb test that spawned the Hulk.


In 1998, David followed Editor Bobbie Chase's suggestion, and wrote a storyline centering on the death of Betty Ross. Betty has radiation poisoning, and desperate to save her, General Thunderbolt Ross worked with Banner, hoping to save her, but they fail, and Betty dies. Following this, David left Marvel, following a conflict about the direction of the series.


Greg Pak introduced the Planet Hulk story arc, which opened with a cabal of Earth’s superpowers, called Illuminati, sending Hulk into deep space to protect the Earth from his destructive rampages after his involvement in the destruction of the Godseye Satellite orbiting Earth. Hulk’s rocket, intended for a desolate, empty planet, instead crashed onto Sakaar. On Sakaar, Hulk rises from slave to king leading a rebellion, and finds love with a wife, Caiera. Shortly after, the rocket that brought Hulk to Sakaar malfunctions and explodes, setting off the planet’s destruction. Following the death of his wife, unborn child, and hundreds of millions of innocents, Hulk gathers some survivors and heads to Earth to exact revenge. Greg Pak is a New York-based film director / comic book writer. ... Planet Hulk is a Marvel Comics storyline running primarily through issues of The Incredible Hulk starting in 2006. ... The Illuminati are a fictional group of superheroes who joined forces and secretly work behind the scenes in the Marvel Universe. ...


In World War Hulk, Hulk along with an alien invasion force, confronts and defeats the members of the Illuminati and several of Marvel's major superhero teams, but he later surrenders and is captured. Bruce Banner is later seen in custody in a military facility where General Ross and Doc Samson seek out Bruce Banner's help with the emerging mystery of a new Red Hulk. World War Hulk is a comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2007, featuring the Hulk. ...


Artistically, the character has been depicted as progressively more muscular in the years since his debut.[32]


Powers and abilities

The Hulk possesses the potential for limitless physical strength depending directly on his emotional state, particularly his anger.[33] This has been reflected in the repeated comment "The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets." His durability, healing, and endurance increase in relation to his temper.[34] The Hulk is also extremely resistant to most forms of injury or damage, including physical, psychic, environmental extremes, and is immune to disease and poisons. His powerful legs allow him to leap into lower Earth orbit or across continents.[35] He also has less commonly described powers, including abilities allowing him to "home in" to his place of origin in New Mexico, and to see and interact with astral forms. He has been shown to have both regenerative and adaptive healing abilities, including growing tissues to allow him to breathe underwater, surviving unprotected in space (yet still needing to breathe), and when injured, healing from almost any wound within seconds, including regenerating lost mass. This is a listing of powers and abilities possessed by the Hulk, a fictional comic book superhero from the Marvel Comics universe. ...


As Bruce Banner (and the Merged/Professor Hulk), he is considered one of the greatest minds on Earth. He has developed expertise in the fields of biology, chemistry, engineering, and physiology, and holds a Ph.D. in nuclear physics. He possesses "a mind so brilliant it cannot be measured on any known intelligence test".[36]


In The Science of Superheroes, Lois Grest and Robert Weinberg examined Hulk’s powers, explaining the scientific flaws in them. Most notably, they point out that the level of gamma radiation Banner is exposed to at the initial blast would induce radiation sickness and kill him, or if not, create significant cancer risks for Banner, because hard radiation strips cells of their ability to function. They go on to offer up an alternate origin, in which a Hulk might be created by biological experimentation with adrenal glands and GFP. In mammals, the adrenal glands are the triangle-shaped endocrine glands that sit atop the kidneys. ... It has been suggested that mGFP be merged into this article or section. ...


Charles Q. Choi from LiveScience.com further explains that unlike the Incredible Hulk, gamma rays are not green - lying as they do beyond the visible spectrum, gamma rays have no color at all that we can describe. He also explains that gamma rays are so powerful (the highest form of light and 10,000 times more powerful than visible light) that they can even create matter- a possible explanation for the increased mass that Bruce Banner takes on during transformations. "Just as the Incredible Hulk 'is the strongest one there is,' as he says himself, so too are gamma ray bursts the most powerful explosions known."[37]


Related characters

Over the long publication history of the Hulk's adventures, many recurring characters have featured prominently, including his sidekick, Rick Jones, love interest Betty Ross, and her father, the often adversarial General Thunderbolt Ross. Enemies Abomination Absorbing Man Agamemnon Ajax Alien Kid Anacondas Ape Men Armaggeddon John Armbruster Amphibion Aquon Bi-Beast Brian Banner Boomerang Yuri Brevlov Caiman Captain Barracuda Captain Cybor Captain Omen Changellings Circus of Crime/Ringmaster Cobalt Man Crypto-Man DSpayre Dark Hulk Devastator Devil Hulk Draxon Death Riders Droog...


Interpretations in popular culture

The Hulk character and the concepts behind it have been raised to the level of iconic status by many within and outside the comic book industry. In 2003 the Official PlayStation magazine claimed the character had "stood the test of time as a genuine icon of American pop culture." [38] American cultural icons. ...


The Hulk is often viewed as a reaction to war. As well as being a reaction to the Cold War, the character has been a cipher for the frustrations the Vietnam War raised, and Ang Lee said that the Iraq War influenced his direction.[18][39][40] In the Michael Nyman edited edition of The Guardian, Stefanie Diekmann explored Marvel Comics' reaction to the September 11, 2001 attacks. Diekmann discussed The Hulk's appearance in the comic book Heroes, claiming that his greater prominence, alongside Captain America, aided in "stressing the connection between anger and justified violence without having to depict anything more than a well-known and well-respected protagonist."[41] Asked by Naomi Klein if a new Cold War was imminent, Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez cryptically replied: "The geopolitics of the world will be like the Incredible Hulk comics, where he tenses himself before the transformation."[42] Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This article is about the composer/musician Michael Nyman. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Look up hero, heroine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the original comic book character named Captain America. ... Naomi Klein (b. ... Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (pronounced ) (born July 28, 1954) is the current President of Venezuela. ...


In Comic Book Nation, Wright alludes to Hulk's counterculture status, referring to a 1965 Esquire magazine poll amongst college students which "revealed that student radicals ranked Spider-Man and the Hulk alongside the likes of Bob Dylan and Che Guevara as their favorite revolutionary icons." Wright goes on to cite examples of his anti-authority symbol status. Two of the most notable are "The Ballad of the Hulk" by Jerry Jeff Walker, and the Rolling Stones cover for 30 September 1971, a full color Herb Trimpe piece commissioned for the magazine.[24][43] The Hulk has been caricatured in such animated television series as The Simpsons[44] Robot Chicken and Family Guy,[45] and such sketch comedy TV series as The Young Ones[46]. The character is also used a cultural reference point for someone displaying anger or agitation. For example, in a 2008 Daily Mirror review of an Eastenders episode, a character is described as going "into Incredible Hulk mode, smashing up his flat".[47] This article is about the title. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Lynch (May 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, el Che, or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, political figure, author, military theorist, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas. ... Jerry Jeff Walker (born March 16, 1942) is a country music singer. ... The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Robot Chicken is an Emmy award-winning American stop motion animated comedy television series created by Seth Green and Matthew Senreich, who are the executive producers. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Sketch Show redirects here. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ...


The 2003 Ang Lee directed Hulk film saw discussion of the character's appeal to Asian-Americans.[48] The Taiwanese born Ang Lee commented on the "subcurrent of repression" that underscored the character of The Hulk, and how that mirrored his own experience: "Growing up, my artistic leanings were always repressed -- there was always pressure to do something 'useful,' like being a doctor." Jeff Yang, writing for SF Gate extended this self identification to Asian-American culture, arguing that "the passive-aggressive streak runs deep among Asian Americans -- especially those who have entered creative careers, often against their parents' wishes."[49] This is a Chinese name; the family name is Li (李) Ang Lee (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy Award-winning film director from Taiwan. ... For the 2008 film, see The Incredible Hulk (film). ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ...


Other versions

Main article: Alternate versions of Hulk

Over the decades that Marvel has published Hulk, the company has featured versions of the Hulk set in alternate realities and histories, as well as other forms of art, such as the manga style. In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has also been depicted in other fictional universes. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ...


In other media

Main article: Hulk in other media

The Hulk has featured as the star of numerous other forms of mass media, including two films, TV series, multiple animated cartoon series, and video games. This is a list of media appearances for The Incredible Hulk. ...


Bibliography

  • The Incredible Hulk #1–6 (Marvel Comics, May 1962–March 1963)
  • Tales to Astonish #59–101 (Marvel Comics, September 1964–March 1968)
  • The Incredible Hulk #102–474 (Marvel Comics, April 1968–March 1999, continued numbering from Tales to Astonish)
  • The Incredible Hulk Special #1–4 (Marvel Comics, 1968–1972)
  • The Incredible Hulk Annual #5–20 (Marvel Comics, 1975–1994, continued numbering from The Incredible Hulk Special)
  • Hulk #10–27 (Marvel Comics, August 1978–June 1984, continued numbering from Rampaging Hulk)
  • The Incredible Hulk #-1 (Marvel Comics, July 1997, ISSN 0274-5275)
  • The Incredible Hulk '97 (Marvel Comics, 1997)
  • The Incredible Hulk/Sub-Mariner '98 (Marvel Comics, August 1998)
  • Hulk vol 2, #1–11 (Marvel Comics, April 1999–February 2000)
  • Hulk 1999 (Marvel Comics, 1999)
  • The Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #12–76, #77–#112 (Marvel Comics, March 2000–September 2004, January 2005–January 2008, continued numbering from Hulk vol. 2)
  • The Incredible Hulk 2000 (Marvel Comics, 2000)
  • The Incredible Hulk 2001 (Marvel Comics, 2001)
  • Hulk Vol. 3 #1–present (Marvel Comics, March 2008-present)
  • Hulk Weekly #1–69, Marvel UK title published between 1979–1981. Features original material produced by the likes of Paul Neary and Steve Dillon.

Magazines This article is about the comic book company. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Hulk Comic, or The Incredible Hulk Weekly,[1] was a black-and-white Marvel UK comics anthology published under the editorship of Dez Skinn starting in 1979. ... The Mighty World of Marvel #1: The very first Marvel UK title published in 1972. ... Paul Neary is a British comic book artist, writer and editor. ... Steve Dillon is a British comic book artist. ...

Collections This article is about the comic book company. ...

  • Hulk Visionaries: Peter David Vol. 1 Written by Peter David; Pencils & Cover by Todd McFarlane; collects Incredible Hulk #331-339
  • Hulk Visionaries: Peter David Vol. 2 Written by Peter David; Penciled by Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen, & Jeff Purves; collects Incredible Hulk #340-348
  • Hulk Visionaries: Peter David Vol. 3 Written by Peter David & Steve Englehart; Penciled by Jeff Purves, Alex Saviuk & Keith Pollard; Collects Incredible Hulk #349-354, Web of Spider-Man #44 and Fantastic Four #320.
  • Hulk Visionaries: Peter David Vol. 4 Written by Peter David; collects Incredible Hulk #355-363, and Marvel Comics Presents #26 and #45
  • Incredible Hulk: Dogs of War Written by Paul Jenkins; Penciled by Ron Garney and Mike McKone; collects Incredible Hulk #12-20 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 1: Return of the Monster Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by John Romita, Jr.; collects Incredible Hulk #34-39 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 2: Boiling Point Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by John Romita, Jr.; collects Incredible Hulk #40-43 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 3: Transfer Of Power Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by Stuart Immonen; collects Incredible Hulk #44-49 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 4: Abominable Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by Mike Deodato, Jr.; collects Incredible Hulk #50-54 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 5: Hide In Plain Sight Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by Leandro Fernández; collects Incredible Hulk #55-59 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 6: Split Decisions Written by Bruce Jones; Penciled by Mike Deodato Jr.; collects Incredible Hulk #60-65 Vol. 2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 7: Dead Like Me Written Bruce Jones & Garth Ennis; Pencils by Doug Braithwaite & John McCrea; collects Incredible Hulk #65-69 Vol. 2, and Hulk Smash #1 and #2.
  • Incredible Hulk Vol. 8: Big Things Written Bruce Jones; Pencils by Mike Deodato, Jr.; collects Incredible Hulk #70-76 Vol. 2.
  • Hulk: Tempest Fugit Written by Peter David; Penciled by Lee Weeks & Jae Lee; collects Incredible Hulk #77-82 Vol. 2.
  • House Of M: Hulk Written by Peter David; Penciled by Jorge Lucas & Adam Kubert; collects Incredible Hulk #83-87 Vol. 2.
  • Hulk: Planet Hulk Prelude Written by Daniel Way; Penciled by Keu Cha & Juan Santacruz; collects Incredible Hulk #88-91 Vol. 2.

Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947, Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American comic book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. ... Keith Pollard is an American comic book artist. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Paull Jenkins sketching at a fan convention in 2006 Paul Jenkins (born December 6, 1965) is a British comic book writer, who has primarily worked for Marvel Comics. ... Ron Garney is a comic book artist. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... John Salvatore Romita, Jr. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... John Salvatore Romita, Jr. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Stuart Immonen is a Canadian comic book artist. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Artist Mike Deodato Jr. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Leandro Fernández is a comic book artist, known for his work on various Marvel comic book titles, including The Incredible Hulk, Wolverine and Spiderman: Tangled Web series, as well as one story arc of the Oni Press publication Queen and Country. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Mike Deodato Jr. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Garth Ennis (born January 16, 1970 in Holywood, Northern Ireland) is a Northern Irish comics writer, best known for the DC/Vertigo series Preacher, co-created with artist Steve Dillon. ... Doug Braithwaite is a British comic book artist. ... John McCrea (born 1966 in Belfast, Northern Ireland) is a comic book artist best known for his collaborations with writer Garth Ennis. ... Bruce Jones is an American comic book writer, novelist, illustrator, and screenwriter possibly best known for writing Marvel Comics The Incredible Hulk from 2001-2003. ... Artist Mike Deodato Jr. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Lee Weeks is a comic book artist and penciller. ... Cover art from Manhunter #4 (2005). ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Jorge Lucas is a comic book artist and penciller. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #377; Art by Adam Kubert. ... Daniel Way (b. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Comics Buyer's Guide #1617 (June 2006)
  2. ^ Starlog #213 (July 2003)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Weinstein, Simcha (2006). Up, Up, and Oy Vey!. Baltimore, Maryland: Leviathan Press, 82-97. ISBN 1-881927-32-6. 
  4. ^ a b c d e DeFalco, Tom (2003). The Hulk: The Incredible Guide. London: DK Publishing, 200. ISBN 0=7894-9260-1. 
  5. ^ Taylor, Robert (2006-08-03). Greg Goes Wild on Planet Pak. Wizard Magazine. Wizard Entertainment Group. Retrieved on [[2007-11-15]].
  6. ^ Serwin, Andy (2007-07-23). The Wizard Retrospective: Mike Mignola. Wizard Magazine. Wizard Entertainment Group. Retrieved on [[2007-11-13]].
  7. ^ Radford, Bill. "Marvel's not-so-jolly green giant gets a fresh start and a new team", The Gazette, 1999-02-21, p. L4. 
  8. ^ The Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators: Hulk (II) (1999-2000)
  9. ^ Michael Thomas (August 22 2000). John Byrne: The Hidden Answers. Retrieved on 2007-11-05.
  10. ^ The Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators: Incredible Hulk (III) (2000-2008)
  11. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 3, #13 (April 2000)
  12. ^ Slight change of plan with Hulk. peterdavid.net (September 30, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-11-05.
  13. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 3, #81 (July 2005)
  14. ^ Peter David (July 18 2005). My leaving "Hulk". The Incredible Hulk Message Board. Retrieved on 2005-08-28.
  15. ^ a b Kaplan, Arie (2006). Masters of the Comic Book Universe Revealed!. Chicago, Illinois: Chicago Review Press, 263. ISBN 1-55652-633-4. page 58
  16. ^ a b (May 1962) Incredible Hulk #1.  Page=8
  17. ^ (November 1962) Incredible Hulk #4. 
  18. ^ a b c Gresh, Lois; Robert Weinberg (2002). The Science of Superheroes. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Son, Inc., 200. ISBN 0-471-46882-7. page=27
  19. ^ Daniels, Les (1991). Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World's Greatest Comics. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 287. ISBN 0-8109-2566-4. 
  20. ^ Avengers #1-2
  21. ^ Marvel Feature #1-3 (Dec. 1971 - June 1972)
  22. ^ Tales to Astonish #60
  23. ^ Dave Hill, "Green with anger". Thursday July 17, 2003. The Guardian Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  24. ^ a b Wright, Bradford (2001). Comic Book Nation. Baltimore MD: John Hopkins University Press, 336. ISBN 0-8018-6514-X. 
  25. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #312
  26. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #315
  27. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #319
  28. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #323
  29. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #347
  30. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #372
  31. ^ Incredible Hulk Vol. 2 #382
  32. ^ James Randerson, "Superman copycats 'risk health'" The Guardian, Wednesday May 17 2006. Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  33. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 3, #109 (Oct. 2007)
  34. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 2, #394 (June 1994)
  35. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 3, #33 (Dec. 2001); The Incredible Hulk vol. 2, #254 (Dec. 1980)
  36. ^ Pisani, Joseph. The Smartest Superheroes. BusinessWeek. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  37. ^ Choi, Charles Q. (2008-06-11). Gamma Rays: The Incredible, Hulking Reality. LiveScience. Retrieved on 2008-06-12.
  38. ^ "Smash!" Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  39. ^ "Becoming The Hulk". The New Yorker, (New York); Jun 30, 2003; John Lahr; p. 072
  40. ^ "The Clash Of Symbols". Sunday Herald (Glasgow); Dec 23, 2007; Stephen Phelan; p. 42
  41. ^ Stefanie Diekmann. "Hero and superhero". Saturday April 24, 2004, The Guardian. Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  42. ^ "Scoop of the month: when Naomi met Chávez". Tim Dowling. The Guardian, Tuesday January 8 2008.
  43. ^ Jonah Goldberg, "Spin City". May 7, 2002 12:30 PM, National Review Online. Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  44. ^ The Simpsons. "I Am Furious Yellow". 28 April 2002.
  45. ^ "Chitty Chitty Death Bang". Danny Smith (writer). Family Guy. Fox Broadcasting Company. 1999-04-18. No. 3, season 1.
  46. ^ "The Young Ones: Summer Holiday (#2.6)" (1984)
  47. ^ "We love telly: We love soaps" The Daily Mirror (London); Feb 5, 2008; MAEVE QUIGLEY; p. 1
  48. ^ Gina Marchetti, "Hollywood Taiwan". Film International; Volume: 2; Issue: 6; Cover date: November 2004. Page(s): 42-51 Print ISSN: 1651-6826 doi: 10.1386/fiin.2.6.42 Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.
  49. ^ Jeff Yang, "Look ... Up in the sky! It's Asian Man!". Thursday, June 1, 2006. SF Gate, San Francisco Chronicle published by Hearst Newspapers. Accessed 2008-23-03. Archived 2008-23-03.

Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ... Starlog is a monthly science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gazette is a newspaper based in Colorado Springs, Colorado that is lauded for its local reporting and large margins that make it easier to read. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Herald is a common name for newspapers throughout the English-speaking world, and the Sunday editions are often called Sunday Herald. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... “I Am Furious Yellow” is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons’ thirteenth season. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... --207. ...

References

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and conform with our NPOV policy, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Big Comic Book DataBase is a website containing information about comic books. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

External links

For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Enemies Abomination Absorbing Man Agamemnon Ajax Alien Kid Anacondas Ape Men Armaggeddon John Armbruster Amphibion Aquon Bi-Beast Brian Banner Boomerang Yuri Brevlov Caiman Captain Barracuda Captain Cybor Captain Omen Changellings Circus of Crime/Ringmaster Cobalt Man Crypto-Man DSpayre Dark Hulk Devastator Devil Hulk Draxon Death Riders Droog... This article is about the World War Hulk character Amadeus Cho. ... Betty Ross (later Betty Talbot and then Betty Banner) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Bereet is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... Caiera is a character in the Marvel ComicsUniverse, created during the Planet Hulk storyline. ... Marlo Chandler is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Doc Samson (Dr. Leonard Samson) is a fictional character, a superhero and psychiatrist in the Marvel Comics universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard Milhouse Rick Jones is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The Warbound are a group of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Jim Wilson is the name of a fictional African American Marvel Comics book character that was a longtime friend of Bruce Banner and Rick Jones. ... Enemies Abomination Absorbing Man Agamemnon Ajax Alien Kid Anacondas Ape Men Armaggeddon John Armbruster Amphibion Aquon Bi-Beast Brian Banner Boomerang Yuri Brevlov Caiman Captain Barracuda Captain Cybor Captain Omen Changellings Circus of Crime/Ringmaster Cobalt Man Crypto-Man DSpayre Dark Hulk Devastator Devil Hulk Draxon Death Riders Droog... The Abomination is a fictional character that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Agamemnon is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... The Bi-Beast is a fictional character and a supervillain that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Flux is a fictional villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Gamma Corps are a fictional comic book military unit published by Marvel Comics. ... Hulkbusters is the name of three fictional organizations in the Marvel Universe. ... The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ... Madman is a fictional supervillain from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Mercy is a fictional villain at the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Moonstone. ... Speedfreak is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... General Thaddeus E. Thunderbolt Ross is a fictional character of Marvel Comics. ... General John Ryker is one of the Hulks enemies. ... Major (later Colonel) Glenn Talbot is a fictional character and an armed-villain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Tyrannus (real name Romulus Augustus) is an immortal supervillain in the Marvel Universe. ... U-Foes is the name of a comic book supervillain team appearing in various series published by Marvel Comics. ... The Wen-Di-Go (or more commonly: Wendigo) is a man-eating creature in Marvel comics that is based on the mythical creature of the same name. ... Zzzax is a fictional character that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... This is a list of media appearances for The Incredible Hulk. ... This article is about the live action series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... The Death of the Incredible Hulk was the last of three revival TV movies from the 1977-1982 television show The Incredible Hulk. ... The Marvel Superheroes[1] is a Canadian-made animated television series starring five popular comic-book superheroes from Marvel Comics. ... The Incredible Hulk was an American animated television series based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. ... In 1996, UPN brought Marvel Comics Hulk back to animated form (his last animated series was in 1982 for NBC). ... For the 2008 film, see The Incredible Hulk (film). ... For the 2003 film, see Hulk (film). ... Questprobe was the name of a trilogy of text adventure computer games featuring Marvel Comics characters. ... Hulk is one of the video games. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... World War Hulk is a comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2007, featuring the Hulk. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has also been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Hulk 2099 is a Marvel Comics fictional character created by Gerard Jones and Dwayne Turner. ... Originally released as a part of the merchandise for 2003 Hulk film, Hulk Hands are large foam-rubber shaped Hulk style clenched fists in to which you insert you hands. ... The Incredible Hulk Coaster is a nice roller coaster located in Universals Islands of Adventure in Orlando, Florida. ... This is a listing of powers and abilities possessed by the Hulk, a fictional comic book superhero from the Marvel Comics universe. ...

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