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Encyclopedia > Hui people
Hui
回族 (Huízú)
Hui man near courtyard of Da Qingzhensi, a Chinese mosque.
Total population

9.82 million (in 2000 census) Image File history File links Merge-arrow. ... Dungan (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Russian: ) is a term used in territories of the former Soviet Union to refer to a Muslim people of Chinese origin. ... The Hui (徽) dialects are unrelated to the Hui (回) ethnic group of China. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1497, 681 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Hui people Islam in China Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...

Regions with significant populations
China
Language(s)
Chinese language
Religion(s)
Islam, nonreligious minority [1]
Related ethnic groups
Dungan, Panthay, Han Chinese, Kifeng Jews, other Muslim ethnic groups, possibly other Sino-Tibetan peoples
Picture of a Hui man in China.
Picture of a Hui man in China.

The Hui people (Chinese: 回族; pinyin: Huízú, Xiaoerjing: حُوِ ذَو ) are a Chinese ethnic group, typically distinguished by their practice of Islam. They form one of the 56 ethnic minority groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They are concentrated in Northwestern China (Ningxia, Gansu, Xinjiang), but communities exist across the country. Most Hui are similar in culture to Han Chinese with the exception that they practice Islam, and have some distinctive cultural characteristics as a result. For example, as Muslims, they reject the consumption of pork, the most common meat consumed in Chinese culture, and also do not eat dog, horse, many birds, and other animals considered delicacies in Chinese cuisine. Their mode of dress also differs only in that adult males wear white caps and females wear headscarves or (occasionally) veils, as is the case in most Islamic cultures. They also reject gambling unlike many Han Chinese - especially in mahjong. Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Dungan (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Russian: ) is a term used in territories of the former Soviet Union to refer to a Muslim people of Chinese origin. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Languages Chinese languages Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... Sino-Tibetan languages in red. ... Image File history File links HuiChineseMuslim. ... Image File history File links HuiChineseMuslim. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... A Chinese-Arabic-Xiaoerjing dictionary from the early days of the Peoples Republic of China. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Ethnolinguistic map of China For a list of ethnic groups in China, see List of ethnic groups in China. ... Northwestern China (西北,xÄ«bÄ›i) includes Xinjiang, Xizang(Tibet), Ningxia, and Gansu. ... Ningxia (Simplified Chinese: 宁夏; Traditional Chinese: 寧夏; Pinyin: Níngxià; Wade-Giles: Ning-hsia; Postal Pinyin: Ningsia), full name Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (Simplified Chinese: 宁夏回族自治区; Traditional Chinese: 寧夏回族自治區; Pinyin: Níngxià Huízú ZìzhìqÅ«), is a Hui autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China, located on the northwest Loess... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... Languages Chinese languages Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... China has some of the oldest Muslim history, dating back to as early as 650, when the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad, Sa`ad ibn Abi Waqqas, was sent as an official envoy to Emperor Gaozong. ... Chinese culture has roots going back over five thousand years. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) is widely seen as representing one of the richest and most diverse culinary cuisines and heritages in the world. ... Turkish women in eastern Turkey wearing the non-Islamic yemeni headscarfs. ... Veils as articles of clothing, worn almost exclusively by women, are intended to cover some part of the head or face. ... Islam â–¶(?) (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and said by some sources to be the fastest growing religion in some parts of the world. ... Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... This article is about the four-player game of Chinese origin. ...


In modern usage, the definition of Hui does not include ethnic groups such as the Uyghur, who live in China and practice Islam, but are Turkic people and are thus different culturally from Han Chinese. For example, in Xinjiang-Uyghur Autonomous Region, where about 10 percent of the Hui of China reside, the Hui have a distinct ethnic identity from that of the Uyghurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz, who are Turkic peoples. For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Uyghur language. ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... Languages Kazakh (and/or languages in country of residence) Religions Sunni Islam The Kazakhs (also spelled Kazaks, Qazaqs; Kazakh: Қазақтар []; Russian: Казахи; the English name is transliterated from Russian) are a Turkic people of the northern parts of Central Asia (largely Kazakhstan, but also found in parts of Uzbekistan, China, Russia, and... For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Kyrgyz language. ...

Hui people of China.
Hui people of China.

Included among the Hui in Chinese census statistics (and not officially recognized as a separate ethnic group) are several thousand Utsuls in southern Hainan province, who speak an Austronesian language (Tsat) related to that of the Cham Muslim minority of Vietnam, and who are said to be descended from Chams who migrated to Hainan. Image File history File links HuiChineseMuslim3. ... Image File history File links HuiChineseMuslim3. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tsat (also known as Utsat, Utset, Huihui, Hui, or Hainan Cham) is a language spoken on Hainan Island in China. ... This article is about the Cham people of Asia. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


A traditional Chinese term for Islam is 回教 (pinyin: Huíjiào, literally "the religion of the Hui"), though the most prevalent is the transliteration 伊斯蘭教 (pinyin: 'Yīsīlán jiào, literally "Islam religion"). Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ...

Contents

Origins

Hui people praying in a mosque in China
Hui people praying in a mosque in China

Islam in China


Image File history File linksMetadata HuiChineseMuslim2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata HuiChineseMuslim2. ... China has some of the oldest Muslim history, dating back to as early as 650, when the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad, Sa`ad ibn Abi Waqqas, was sent as an official envoy to Emperor Gaozong. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1300x844, 157 KB)top of Great Mosque of Xian, cropped by me from Image:Chinese-style minaret of the Great Mosque. ...

History of Islam in China

History
Tang Dynasty
Song Dynasty
Yuan Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
Qing Dynasty
Islam in China (1911-present)
The History of Islam in China begins in 651 with the arrival in China of an envoy sent by the third Caliph during the Tang Dynasty, just eighteen years after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. ... The History of Islam in China goes back to the earliest years of Islam. ... The change in dynasty in China from the Tang to the dynasties that included the Song Dynasty did not greatly interrupt the trends of Muslims established during the Tang. ... The establishment of the Yuan Dynasty in China had dramatically benefited Islam in China in contrast to previous dynasties. ... As the Yuan Dynasty ended, many Mongols as well as the Muslims who came with them remained in China. ... The rise of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) made relations between the Muslims and Chinese more difficult. ... After the fall of the Qing Dynasty, which was hostile to Muslims, there appeared to be a reason for hope as Sun Yat Sen, who led the new republic, immediately proclaimed that the country belonged equally to the Han, Hui (Muslim), Meng (Mongol), and the Tsang (Tibetan) peoples. ...

Architecture

Chinese mosques
Niujie Mosque The Great Mosque of Xian, one of Chinas largest mosques Dongsi Mosque [1] Great Mosque, Huhhot [2] Great Mosque, Tianjin [3] Great Mosque, Xian [4] Huaisheng Mosque in Guangzhou [5] Huajue Mosque in Xian Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar [6] Najiahu Mosque in Yinchuan Nanguan Mosque... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Major figures

Lan YuHui LiangyuZheng HeMa Bufang
Haji Noor Lan Yu (Chinese: ; pinyin: Lán Yǔ) is a gay-themed Chinese film by Hong Kong director Stanley Kwan in 2001. ... Hui Liangyu (born 1938) is the Vice Premier of China in charge of agriculture. ... A modern illustration of Zheng He, by an unidentified artist. ... Ma Bufang (Chinese: 馬步芳; 1903–1975), was a prominent Ma clique warlord in China during the Republic of China era, ruling the northwestern province of Qinghai. ... Hajji Noor Deen Mi Guangjiang (米廣江, born 1963) is an expert in Islamic calligraphy, specializing in the Sini style which originated from the Chinese Muslim tradition. ...

People Groups

HuiSalarUygur
KazakhsKyrgyzTatarsBonan
UzbeksTibetansDongxiang
Bao'anTajiksUtsul
The Salar people (Chinese: 撒拉族, Pinyin: Sālāzú) are one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China. ... For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Uyghur language. ... Languages Kazakh (and/or languages in country of residence) Religions Sunni Islam The Kazakhs (also spelled Kazaks, Qazaqs; Kazakh: Қазақтар []; Russian: Казахи; the English name is transliterated from Russian) are a Turkic people of the northern parts of Central Asia (largely Kazakhstan, but also found in parts of Uzbekistan, China, Russia, and... For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Kyrgyz language. ... The Chinese Tatars (塔塔尔族 Tǎtǎěrzú) form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Bonan (also Baoan) people (保安族; pinyin: bǎoān zú) are an ethnic group living in Gansu and Qinghai provinces in northwestern China. ... The Tibetan Muslims, also known as the Kachee (Kache), form a small minority in Tibet. ... The Dongxiang people (autonym: Sarta or Santa (撒尔塔); Simplified Chinese: 东乡族 Traditional Chinese︰東鄉族; Pinyin: Dōngxiāngzú) are one of 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Bonan (also Baoan) people (保安族; pinyin: bǎoān zú) are an ethnic group living in Gansu and Qinghai provinces in northwestern China. ... Tajiks in China (Chinese: 塔吉克族, Pinyin: ) are one of the 56 nationalities officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Utsuls are a tiny ethnic group which lives on the Chinese island of Hainan. ...

Islamic Cities/Regions

LinxiaXinjiang
NingxiaKashgar Linxia (simplified Chinese: 临夏; traditional Chinese: 臨夏; pinyin: Línxià, once known as Hezhou) is a county-level city in the province of Gansu of the Peoples Republic of China. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... Ningxia (Simplified Chinese: 宁夏; Traditional Chinese: 寧夏; Pinyin: Níngxià; Wade-Giles: Ning-hsia; Postal Pinyin: Ningsia), full name Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (Simplified Chinese: 宁夏回族自治区; Traditional Chinese: 寧夏回族自治區; Pinyin: Níngxià Huízú Zìzhìqū), is a Hui autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China, located on the northwest Loess... Location of Kashgar Kashgars Sunday market Kashgar (also spelled Cascar[1]) (Uyghur: /; Chinese: ; pinyin: , ), is an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Culture

Islamic Association of China
CuisineCalligraphyMartial arts The Islamic Association of China (Chinese: ) claims to represent Chinese Muslims nationwide. ... Chinese Islamic cuisine is cuisine of the Hui (ethnic Chinese Muslims) and other Muslims living in China. ... Sini is a Chinese Islamic calligraphic form for the Arabic script. ... Muslim Chinese martial arts have a long history in China, and many Muslims have participated at the highest level of Chinese Wushu. ...

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The Hui Chinese have diverse origins. Some in the southeast coast are descended from Muslim traders who settled in China and gradually intermarried and assimilated into the surrounding population keeping only their distinctive religion. A totally different explanation is available for the Mandarin Chinese-speaking Yunnan and Northern Huis, whose ethnogenesis might be a result of the convergence of large number of Mongol, Turkic or other Central Asian settlers in these regions who formed the dominant stratum in the Mongol Yuan Dynasty. However, even Cantonese Muslims, of the southeastern coast, typically resemble northern Asians much more so than their typical Cantonese neighbours. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article is on all of the Northern Chinese dialects. ... Yunan redirects here. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Capital Dadu Language(s) Mongolian Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1260-1294 Kublai Khan  - 1333-1370 (Cont. ...


It was documented that a proportion of these nomad or military ethnic groups were originally Nestorian Christians many of whom later converted to Islam, while under the sinicizing pressures of the Ming and Qing states. The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... For other uses, see Ming. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Territory of Qing China in 1892 Capital Shengjing (1636-1644) Beijing (1644-1912) Language(s) Chinese Manchu Mongolian Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1636-1643 Huang Taiji  - 1908-1912 Xuantong Emperor Prime Minister  - 1911 Yikuang  - 1911-1912 Yuan Shikai History  - Establishment of the Late...


This explains the ethnonym "Hui," in close affinity with that of "Uyghur," albeit Sinicized and contradistinctive from "Uyghur" in usage. The ethnonym "Hui," though for a long time used as an umbrella term (at least since Qing) to designate Muslim Chinese speakers everywhere and Muslims in general (for example, a Qing Chinese might describe a Uyghur as a "Chantou" who practiced the "Hui" religion), was not used in the Southeast as much as "Qīngzhēn", a term still in common use today, especially for Muslim (Hui) eating establishments and for mosques (qīngzhēn sì in Mandarin). The Uyghur (Uyghur: ئۇيغۇر; Uighur Simplified Chinese: 维吾尔; Traditional Chinese: 維吾爾; Pinyin: Wéiwúěr; Turkish: Uygur) are a Turkic people, forming one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China. ... An umbrella term is a word that provides a superset or grouping of related concepts, also called a hypernym. ... QÄ«ngzhÄ“n (清真) is the Chinese term for certain Islamic institutions. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... This article is on all of the Northern and Southwestern Chinese dialects. ...


Southeastern Muslims also have a much longer tradition of synthesizing Confucian teachings with the Sharia and Qur'anic teachings, and were reported to have been contributing to the Confucian officialdom since the Tang period. Among the Northern Hui, on the other hand, there are strong influences of Central Asian Sufi schools such as Kubrawiyya, Qadiriyya, Naqshbandiyya (Khufiyya and Jahriyya) etc. mostly of the Hanafi Madhhab (whereas among the Southeastern communities the Shafi'i Madhhab is more of the norm). Before the "Ihwani" movement, a Chinese variant of the Salafi movement, Northern Hui Sufis were very fond of synthesizing Taoist teachings and martial arts practices with Sufi philosophy. Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the dynamic body of Islamic religious law. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... Naqshbandi (Naqshbandiyya) is one of the major Sufi orders (tariqa) of Islam. ... The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... The Šāfiˤī madhab (Arabic: شافعي) is one of the four schools of fiqh, or religious law, within Sunni Islam. ... This article is on the beliefs of the followers of the Salaf. ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


In early modern times, villages in Northern Chinese Hui areas still bore labels like "Blue-cap Huihui," "Black-cap Huihui," and "White-cap Huihui," betraying their possible Christian, Judaic and Muslim origins, even though the religious practices among North China Hui by then were by and large Islamic. Hui is also used as a catch-all grouping for Islamic Chinese who are not classified under another ethnic group.


Definition of Hui

The definition of Hui Chinese poses some interesting issues. The obvious definition of the Hui as being Islamic Chinese poses two problems. The first is that the People's Republic of China is nominally atheist. The second is that if Chinese Muslims are entitled to ethnic group status, then there is uncertainty about the status of Chinese Christians and Buddhists. In defining the Hui, the government has sidestepped this issue by defining them in terms of their group identity and ignore the fact that their group identity is based on religion. However, many Hui and others believe that the label is appropriate because the Hui have a history and culture that would not be such without their being Muslim, and thus setting them apart from other Chinese groups. In contrast, the cultural differences between Han Chinese Christians and other Chinese are much more subtle, and the boundary between the two is much more fluid, especially considering the level of Crypto-Christianity among the Han population. In addition, many say that a person that is Hui is quite different from a Han Chinese who simply converts to Islam. “Atheist” redirects here. ... For more background, see Religion in China. ... Shakyamuni Buddha teaching. ... Crypto-Christianity commonly refers to the secret practice of the Christian religion, usually while attempting to camouflage it as another faith or observing the rituals of another religion publicly. ...


Huis anywhere are referred to by Central Asian Turks and Tajiks as Dungans. In its population censuses, the Soviet Union also identified Chinese Muslims as "Dungans" (дунгане) and recorded them as located mainly in Kyrgyzstan, southern Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. In the Russian census of 2002, a total of 800 Dungans were enumerated. In Thailand Chinese Muslims are referred to as chin ho, in Myanmar and Yunnan Province, as Panthay. The Dungan are a Chinese Muslim people in Kyrgyzstan. ... Yunnan (Simplified Chinese: 云南; Traditional Chinese: 雲南; pinyin: Yúnnán) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the far southwestern corner of the country. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Hui in Malaysia

There is evidence that Chinese Hui migrated to Peninsular Malaysia in the influx of Chinese labourers during the nineteenth and late twentieth century. Chinese who have the surname Ma are suspected to have Hui ancestry. A number of them settled in the region of Lumut in Peninsular Malaysia. It is speculated that these Muslims assimilated with the local non-Muslim Chinese and now most of them are no longer Muslims. Nonetheless, there are those who still maintain their Islamic faith. A famous Chinese Muslim missionary in Malaysia has the surname of Ma.


There are increasing numbers of Chinese converts to Islam. If they are married to Muslim Malaysian indigenous persons, their offspring are officially accepted as part of the "Bumiputra" (indigenous people or "sons of the land"). Otherwise, the society might treat them as party of the large Chinese minority group. However as Islam is also an ethnic marker in Malaysia (Islam = Malay race), many Chinese converts in Malaysia tend to adopt and assimilate into the indigenous culture. However, there is a trend since the 1900s for Chinese converts to retain their original pre-Muslim Chinese surname, probably to maintain their cultural identity Bumiputra or Bumiputera (Malay, from Sanskrit Bhumiputra; translated literally, it means son of the soil), is an official definition widely used in Malaysia, embracing ethnic Malays as well as other indigenous ethnic groups such as the Orang Asli in Peninsular Malaysia and the tribal peoples in Sabah and Sarawak. ...


Surnames

These are surnames generally used by the Hui ethnic group:[citation needed]

Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Hasan ibn Ali ibn Abu Talib (c. ... Hussein (also spelled Husayn and Husain) is a common Middle Eastern name especially among Shiite Muslims, because of the popularity of Hussein bin Ali, the grandson of Muhammad and the Shiites third Imam. ... سید Sayyid (also rendered as Sayed or, in Malaysia and The Subcontinent, as Syed) is an honorific title often given to descendants of the Prophet Muhammad through his grandson, Hussain and Hassan (Descendants of Hassan were known as Sharif in the Arab world. ... Shams is the Arabic word for sun (شمس). It is found in Shamsa ta saada ye che da khkulo na wafa ghwarey . ...

Prominent Hui

  • Bai Chongxi (白崇禧), a general of the Republic of China
  • Bai Shouyi (白壽彝), prominent Chinese historian and ethnologist
  • Hui Liangyu (回良玉), a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China
  • Li Zhi (李贄), a descendant of Persian merchant and famous philosopher, would perhaps be considered a Hui if he lived today
  • Ma Dexin (马德新), Islamic scholar in Yunnan
  • Ma Hualong (马化龙), one of the leaders of the Muslim Rebellion of 1862-77.
  • Shi Zhongxin, mayor of Harbin from 2002 to February 2007, whose ancestors came from Jilin
  • Zhang Chengzhi (張承志), contemporary author and alleged creator of the term "Red Guards"
  • Zheng He (鄭和), a Semu Muslim, probably the most famous Muslim in Chinese history, would perhaps be considered a Hui if he lived today

Bai Chongxi in uniform Bai Chongxi (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pai Chung-hsi) (18 March 1893 – 1 December 1966), also spelled Pai Chung-hsi, was a Chinese Muslim general in the National Revolutionary Army of the Republic of China (ROC). ... Bai Shouyi (Traditional 白壽彝; Simplified 白寿彝; Pinyin: Bái Shòuyì) (February 1909 _ March 21, 2000) was a prominent Chinese historian, thinker, social activist and ethnologist who revolutionized recent Chinese historiography and pioneered in relying heavily on scientific excavations and reports. ... Hui Liangyu (born 1938) is the Vice Premier of China in charge of agriculture. ... Li Zhi (Chinese: 李贄/李贽 Pinyin:Lǐ Zhì) (1527-1602) was a prominent Chinese philosopher, historian and writer in the late Ming dynasty. ... Yusuf Ma Dexin (1794-1874) was a Hui Chinese scholar of Islam from Yunnan, renowned for his fluency and proficiency in both Arabic and Persian, and for his profound Islamic knowledge. ... Ma Hualong (马化龙) (? - 1871), an adherent to Sufism, was a leader in the Muslim Rebellion. ... The Hui Minorities War, is the modern term used by the Peoples Republic of China for what used to be called the Dungan Revolt or Muslim Rebellion. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ...   (Chinese: ; Pinyin: Jílín; Wade-Giles: Chi-lin; Postal System Pinyin: Kirin; Manchu: Girin ula), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ... Zhang Chengzhi is a contemporary Hui Chinese author. ... Red Guards refer to socialist or communist militia formed to instigate, support, or defend communist revolutions. ... A modern illustration of Zheng He, by an unidentified artist. ... The Semu (色目 in Chinese characters) Contrary to popular definition, the term Semu (literally color-eye) actually does not mean people with colored eyes as if other castes of the Mongol Yuan society had black eyed in contrast. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...

Related group names

Dungan (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Russian: ) is a term used in territories of the former Soviet Union to refer to a Muslim people of Chinese origin. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Utsuls are a tiny ethnic group which lives on the Chinese island of Hainan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

See also

Hui pan-nationalism refers to the post-1949 phenomenon of a sense of common nationhood kindled among diverse communities of Chinese-speaking Muslims, due to the dialectics between the Hui nationality designation by the Communist government and the process of modernization of traditional Muslim Chinese groups and individuals. ... China has some of the oldest Muslim history, dating back to as early as 650, when the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad, Sa`ad ibn Abi Waqqas, was sent as an official envoy to Emperor Gaozong. ... The Hui Minorities War, is the modern term used by the Peoples Republic of China for what used to be called the Dungan Revolt or Muslim Rebellion. ... The Panthay Rebellion (known in Chinese as the Du Wenxiu Qiyi 杜文秀起义 (1856 - 1873) was a separatist movement of the Hui people, Chinese Muslims, against the imperial Qing Dynasty in southwestern Yunnan Province, China. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hui people
  • Dru C. Gladney, "Ethnic Identity in China: The Making of a Muslim Minority Nationality (Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology)", 1997, ISBN 0155019708.
  • Dru C. Gladney, "Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Subaltern Subjects", 2004, ISBN 0226297756.
  • Dru C. Gladney, "Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic". 1st ed. 1991; 2nd ed., 1996. ISBN 0-674-59497-5.
  • "CHINA'S ISLAMIC HERITAGE" China Heritage Newsletter (Australian National University), No. 5, March 2006.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hui people (1297 words)
The Hui people (Chinese: 回族; pinyin: Huízú) are a Chinese ethnic group, typically distinguished by their practice of the Islamic religion.
Most Hui are similar in culture to Han Chinese with the exception that they practice Islam, and have some distinctive cultural characteristics as a result.
However, many Hui and others believe that the label is appropriate because the Hui have a history and culture that would not be such without their being Muslim, and thus setting them apart from other Chinese groups.
Hui - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (144 words)
Hui (family name) (許) is a family name particularly for Cantonese-speaking Chinese.
Hui (secret society), a Chinese term referring to a secret brotherhood.
Hui (Хуй) is a deragotary name of male reproductive organ and common expletive in Russian.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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