FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hugh de Morville, Lord of Cunningham and Lauderdale

Hugh de Morville († 1162) was a Norman knight who made his fortune in the service of David fitz Malcolm, Prince of the Cumbrians (1113-24) and King of Scots (1124-53). Norman may refer to: M.E. Norman, a steamboat that capsized in Memphis in 1925 Normans, a people who colonized Normandy and conquered England Norman architecture, styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans Norman dynasty, a series of monarchs who ruled England and/or Normandy Norman language, a Romance... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain...


His parentage is said by some to be unclear, but Professor Barrow, in his Anglo-Norman era states: "it seems probable that the father of William, and the first Hugh de Morville, was the Richard de Morville who witnessed charters by Richard de Redvers for Montebourg and the church of St. Mary in the castle of Néhou in the early twelfth century."[1]


Hugh came from Morville in the Cotentin Peninsula, territory controlled by David since it had been given to him by King Henry I of England some time after 1106. It must have been sometime soon after 1106 that Hugh joined David's small French household followers and military retinue. In 1113 David became Earl of Huntingdon-Northampton (by marriage) and Prince of the Cumbrians, after forcing his brother Alexander, King of Scots, to hand over territory in southern "Scotland".[2] David achieved this with his French followers[3] The Cotentin Peninsula juts out into the English Channel from Normandy towards England, forming part of the north-west coast of France. ... Henry I (circa 1068 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William the Conqueror and the first born in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. ... Earl of Huntingdon is a title which has been created several times in the Peerage of England. ... Alexander I (Alasdair mac Maíl Coluim) (c. ...


David endowed Hugh with the estates of Bozeat and Whissendine from his Huntingdon earldom,[4] and the baronies of Lauderdale and (perhaps later) Cunningham in Scotland.[5] During David's take-over of northern England after 1136, Hugh was also given the lordship of Appleby - essentially northern Westmorland.[6] After the death of Edward, Constable of Scotland, almost certainly in 1138 at the Battle of the Standard, Hugh was given this position.[7] Bozeat is a village and civil parish in the Wellingborough borough of Northamptonshire, England, located six miles south of Wellingborough on the A509 road, near Wollaston. ... Whissendine is a large village in the county of Rutland in the East Midlands of England. ... Huntingdon is a town in the county of Cambridgeshire in East Anglia, England. ... Lauderdale is the name of the district enclosing the town of Lauder, and the valley of the Leader Water in Scotland: Lauderdale, Scotland Lauderdale is the name of several places in the United States of America: Lauderdale, Louisiana (two places): in Allen Parish in St. ... In sailing, a cunningham or cunninghams eye is a type of downhaul used on a Bermuda rigged sailboat to change the shape of a sail. ... Appleby may refer to: Appleby, a fictional character in Joseph Hellers novel Catch-22 Appleby College, an independent school in Oakville, Ontario, Canada, founded 1911. ... Westmorland (formerly also spelt Westmoreland, an even older spelling is Westmerland) is an area of north west England and one of the 39 historic counties of England. ... The Lord High Constable is a hereditary, now ceremonial, office of Scotland. ... The monument on the battlefield at Grid reference SE360977 The Battle of the Standard took place on 22 August 1138 near Northallerton in Yorkshire. ...


In 1150 Hugh made a further mark on the history of southern Scotland by founding Dryburgh Abbey for Premonstratensian monks.[8] Hugh eventually retired there as a monk, soon before his death in 1162.[9] An ancient memorial to him in the South wall is said to mark his burial-place.[citation needed] Dryburgh Abbey was founded in 1152 by Premonstratensian monks, on a site perhaps made sacred by Saint Modan around 600. ... The Norbertines, also known as the Premonstratensians (OPraem) and in England, as the White Canons (from the colour of their habit), are a Christian religious order of Augustinian canons founded at Prémontré near Laon in 1120 by Saint Norbert, afterwards archbishop of Magdeburg. ...


Hugh married Beatrice, the heiress of Houghton Conquest, and daughter of Robert de Beauchamp, a son of Hugh de Beauchamp of Bedford. They had at least two sons and two daughters, including his successor, Richard de Morville.[10] Another son, Hugh de Morville, Lord of Westmorland, was a principal player in the assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. He subsequently fell out of favour with the king and was forfeited (1174) when the Lordship of Westmorland (which he had inherited from his father who had received it from David I) was granted to his sister, Maud. Hugh II's other sister, Joan (d.1247), married Richard, a younger son of Ralph Gernon of Bakewell, Derbyshire.[citation needed] Bedford is the county town of Bedfordshire, England. ... Richard de Morville (d. ... 13th century depiction of Thomas Beckets murder; Hugh de Morvile was among the assassins Hugh de Morville (died c. ... (St. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Barrow, pp. 70–71n.
  2. ^ Richard Oram, David: The King Who Made Scotland, (Gloucestershire, 2004), pp. 59–63; A.A.M. Duncan, Scotland: The Making of the Kingdom, (Edinburgh, 1975), pp. 134, 217–8, 223.
  3. ^ A.O. Anderson, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers: AD 500–1286, (London, 1908), republished, Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson (ed.), (Stamford, 1991), p. 193.
  4. ^ Keith Stringer, "Morville, Hugh de (d. 1162)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 Nov 2006
  5. ^ G.W.S. Barrow, "Beginnings of Military Feudalism", p. 251; Keith Stringer, "Early Lords of Lauderdale", in Keith Stringer (ed.), Essays on the Nobility of Medieval Scotland, (Edinburgh, 1985), pp. 46-7, implies that he got his English possesions first, but his patron David acquired his English and southern 'Scottish' possessions at the same time, and there is no evidence that he granted out his English possessions before granting out his Scottish possessions.
  6. ^ Keith Stringer, "Morville, Hugh de (d. 1162)"; G.W.S. Barrow, "The Scots and the North of England", p. 138.
  7. ^ Sir Archibald Lawrie, Early Scottish Charters Prior to A.D. 1153, (Glasgow, 1905), p. 379.
  8. ^ D.E.R. Watt, & N.F. Shead, (eds.), The Heads of Religious Houses in Scotland from the 12th to the 16th Centuries, The Scottish Record Society, New Series, Volume 24, (Edinburgh, 2001), p. 101.
  9. ^ Keith Stringer, "Early Lords of Lauderdale", p. 46.
  10. ^ Keith Stringer, "Morville, Hugh de (d. 1162)".

Bibliography

  • Anderson, Alan Orr Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers: AD 500–1286, (London, 1908), republished, Marjorie Anderson (ed.) (Stamford, 1991)
  • Barrow, G.W.S., The Anglo-Norman Era in Scottish History, Oxford, 1980, p.71n.
  • Barrow, G.W.S., "Beginnings of Military Feudalism", in G.W.S. Barrow (ed.), The Kingdom of the Scots, (Edinburgh, 2003), pp. 250–78
  • Barrow, G.W.S., (editor) The Scots and the North of England in The Kingdom of the Scots, (Edinburgh, 2003), pp. 130–47
  • Duncan, A.A.M., Scotland: The Making of the Kingdom, (Edinburgh, 1975)
  • Lawrie, Sir Archibald, Early Scottish Charters Prior to A.D. 1153, (Glasgow, 1905)
  • Oram, Richard, David: The King Who Made Scotland, (Gloucestershire, 2004)
  • Stringer, Keith, Early Lords of Lauderdale, in Keith Stringer (ed.), Essays on the Nobility of Medieval Scotland, (Edinburgh, 1985), pp. 44–71
  • Stringer, Keith, Morville, Hugh de (d. 1162), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 Nov 2006
  • Watt, D.E.R. & Shead, N.F. (eds.), The Heads of Religious Houses in Scotland from the 12th to the 16th Centuries, The Scottish Records Society, New Series, Volume 24, (Edinburgh, 2001)
Preceded by
New Creation
Lord of Lauderdale
1113 x 1124– 1162
Succeeded by
Richard de Morville
Lord of Cunningham
1113 x 11241162
Preceded by
Edward
Constable of Scotland
11381162

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m