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Encyclopedia > Hugh Roe O'Donnell

"Red" Hugh O'Donnell (Aodh Rua Ó Domhnaill in Irish) (1572- 10 September 1602) was an Irish lord who led a rebellion against English government in Ireland from 1593 and helped to lead the Nine Years War, a revolt against English occupation, from 1595 to 1603. January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... This page is about the year. ... The Nine Years War (Irish: Cogadh na Naoi mBliana) in Ireland took place from 1594 to 1603 and is also known as Tyrones Rebellion. ...

Contents

Early Life, Imprisonment and Escape

For the political context of O'Donnell's life see the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland The Tudor re-conquest of Ireland took place under the English Tudor dynasty during the 16th century. ...


Hugh Roe was born to the King of Tir Connaill, Aodh mac Maghnusa Ó Domhnaill, and his second wife, the Ineen Dubh, in 1572. At the age of 15 years he was kidnapped by Sir John Perrot in an attempt to prevent an alliance between the O'Donnell and O'Neill clans, and imprisoned in Dublin Castle in 1587. He escaped briefly in 1591 but was recaptured within days. He finally managed to escape in January 1592 with the assistance of his ally Hugh O'Neill, who arranged for his escape from Dublin into the Wicklow Mountains in the height of winter. He successfully reached the stronghold of Fiach MacHugh O'Byrne (another of O'Neill's allies) at Glenmalure, where he found refuge, but his companion and fellow escapee Art O'Neill died of exposure in the mountains. O'Donnell himself lost both his big toes due to frostbite. Hugh O'Donnell and his two companions, the brothers Art and Shane O'Neill, are the only prisoners to ever successfully escape captivity in Dublin Castle. Sir John Perrot (c. ... ODonnell Coat of Arms another ODonnell Coat of Arms HeatherODonnell is my best friend. ... The ancient arms of Ua Néill ONeill (also spelled ONeil, ONeal) is a common surname of Irish origin. ... Dublin Castle. ... Hugh ONeill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone (c. ... The Wicklow Mountains are a range of mountains in the south-east of Ireland. ... Fiach MacHugh OByrne (1544-1597) was chief of the OByrne clan during the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland. ... Glenmalure is a valley in the Wicklow Mountains in eastern Ireland. ... Frostbite (congelatio in medical terminology) is the medical condition where damage is caused to skin and other tissues due to extreme cold. ...


The Nine Years War

Upon his return to Ulster, he gained the leadership of the O'Donnell Clan (known as Clan Dalaigh of the tribe Cenel Connaill derived from the Heremonian Dynasty of High-Kings of Ireland), O'Donnell becoming Lord of Tyrconnel (modern Donegal) after his father abdicated in his favour later that year. Having driven the crown sheriff out of Tyrconnel, he successfully led two expeditions against Turlough Luineach O'Neill in 1593, in order to force Turlough O'Neill to abdicate his chieftainship in favour of Hugh O'Neill. At this point, O'Neill did not join O'Donnell in open rebellion, but secretly backed him in order to enhance his bargaining power with the English. O'Donnell by now was also communicating with Phillip II of Spain for military aid. Statistics Area: 24,481 km² Population (2006 estimate) 1,993,918 Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) forms one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland. ... Tyrconnell can refer to: a territory in Ireland, now more commonly referred to as County Donegal (see Tír Conaill), although the Kingdom and later Principality of Tyrconnell was broader than that, including parts of Sligo, Leitrim (Republic of Ireland), and Fermanagh (United Kingdom). ... Donegal (Irish: Dún na nGall) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. ... Turlough Luineach ONeill (c. ... Hugh ONeill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone (c. ... Philip II of Spain (1527 – September 13, 1598), King of Spain (r. ...


Declaring open rebellion against the English the following year, O'Donnell's forces captured Connaught from Sligo to Leitrim by 1595. In this year, Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone, abandoned negotiation with the English and in 1596 the combined forces of O'Donnell and O'Neill defeated an English army under Sir Henry Bagenal at the Battle of Clontibret. Connaught redirects here. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Leitrim (Irish: Liatroim) is one of the counties in the west of Ireland and is part of the province Connacht. ... Hugh ONeill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone (c. ... The Battle of Clontibret (1595) was fought in modern County Monaghan in Ulster in northern Ireland during the Nine Years War, between the crown forces of Queen Elizabeth and the rebel army of Hugh ONeill, 3rd Earl of Tyrone. ...


Their greatest victory came two years later however at Battle of the Yellow Ford on the Blackwater River near the southern border of Tyrone in August 1598. At this battle, the Irish annihilated an English force marching to relieve Armagh and they seemed on the verge of expelling the English from Ireland altogether. O'Neill then went south to secure the alliegance of Irish lords in Munster, while O'Donnell raided Connacht, driving out the small English settlement there. Battle of the Yellow Ford - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Blackwater rivers are rivers with waters colored like black tea to coffee. ... The name Tyrone can refer to: A county in Northern Ireland; see County Tyrone An Earl of Tyrone A small steam train which runs between Bushmills and the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Connaught redirects here. ...


However, in the next two years, O'Donnell and O'Neill were hard pressed with the deployment of thousands more English troops in the country. O'Donnell repulsed an English expedition towards western Ulster at the battle of Curlew Pass in 1599, but his and O'Neill's position was increasingly defensive. Even worse for O'Donnell than English offensives was the defection of his kinsman, Niall Garve O'Donnell to the English side, in return for their backing his own claim the O'Donnell chieftainship. Niall Garve's support allowed the English to land a sea-borne force at Derry in the heart of O'Donnell's territory. The Battle of Curlew Pass was fought on the 15th of August 1599, during the Nine Years War (Ireland), between an English force under Sir Conyers Clifford and a rebel Irish force led by Red Hugh ODonnell. ... Niall Garve ODonnell (1560 - 1626), who was incensed at the elevation of his cousin Hugh Roe to the chieftainship in 1592, was further alienated when the latter deprived him of his castle of Lifford, and a bitter feud between the two ODonnells was the result. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


They recognised that their only chance of winning the war outright was with the aid of a Spanish invasion. The Spanish finally landed at Kinsale - at virtually the opposite end of Ireland from the Ulster rebels in September 1601. O'Donnell Led his army in a hard march during the winter of 1601, often covering over 40 miles a day, to join O'Neill and the Spanish General Juan del Aquila at Kinsale arriving in early December 1601. Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ... Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ...


En route, true to his family arms and Constantinian motto In Hoc Signo Vinces and in anticipation of the battle to come at Kinsale, he visited and venerated a relic of the True Cross (Holy rood) on the Feast of St. Andrew, on November 30, 1601 at Holy Cross Abbey, which was a rallying point the defence of religious freedom and for Irish sovereignty. From there he sent an expedition to Ardfert in County Kerry, to win a quick victory and successfully recover the territory of his ally, Fitzmaurice, Lord of Kerry, who had lost it and his 9-year old son, to Sir Charles Wilmot. He left some of his O'Donnell kinsmen behind in Ardfert to guard the Barony of Clanmaurice. Sample of use of In hoc signo vinces in an old Brazilian Coin (year 1721) In hoc signo vinces (Greek: ἐν τούτῳ νίκα) is a Latin phrase meaning in this sign you shall conquer. ... Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ... According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... Holy Rood Widely considered to be a part of the cross Jesus died on, and also name of Chapel & the Royal Palace in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Holy Cross Abbey is a monastery of the Catholic Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), popularly known as the Trappists near Berryville, Virginia. ... Ardfert (Ard Fhearta in Irish) is a parish in the barony of Clanmaurice, County Kerry, Ireland, anciently in the territory of Ui Fearba/Hy Ferba. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Tralee Code: KY Area: 4,746 km² Population (2006) 139,616 Website: www. ... Ardfert (Ard Fhearta in Irish) is a parish in the barony of Clanmaurice, County Kerry, Ireland, anciently in the territory of Ui Fearba/Hy Ferba. ...


During the Battle of Kinsale on 5/6 January 1602 the combined forces of Del Aquila, O'Neill and O'Donnell were defeated by Sir Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy. Siege of Kinsale - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Charles Blount, 1st Earl of Devon and 8th Baron Mountjoy (1563 - April 3, 1606) served as Lord Deputy and as Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland during the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. ...


Flight to Spain and Death

After the Irish defeat at Kinsale, O'Donnell sailed to Spain with the aim of securing further assistance from the Spanish Philip III.He died there, in 1602 at the age of twenty-nine, at Simancas Castle. With his death Spanish plans to send furhter assistance to the Irish were abandoned. While it was once commonly held that he had been poisoned - a James Blake from Galway is often named as the assassin who befriended and then poisoned him on behalf of the English - it is now widely believed that he died of a tapeworm. Simancas, a town of Spain, in the province of Valladolid; 8 miles SW of Valladolid, on the road to Zamora and the right bank of the river Pisuerga. ... Poisoned is a free peer-to-peer computer program for Mac OS X. It is a frontend to giFT, and currently supports the OpenFT, FastTrack and Gnutella protocols, using the third-party gift-fasttrack plugin. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


He was buried in the chapter of the Franciscan monastery in Valladolid. However, the building was knock down in the nineteenth century, and the exact location of the tomb is unknown. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Plaza Mayor and city hall, Valladolid Valladolid is an industrial city and its municipality in central Spain, upon the Rio Pisuerga and within the Ribera del Duero region. ... A tomb is a small building (or vault) for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. ...


He was succeeded as chief of the Clan O'Donnell and Lord of Tyrconnel by his brother Rory O'Donnell. Rory ODonnell, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell (1575–1608) 1602 Rory ODonnell succeeded his brother Hugh Roe O’Donnell, Lord of Tyrconnell, as the Irish chieftain of the clan ODonnell, At the time his brother was rebelling against King James I. 1603 he went to London...


He was highly praised in the Irish language writings of the early seventeenth century for his nobility and religious commitment to Roman Catholicism - notably in the Annals of the Four Masters and Beatha Aodh Rua O Domhnaill ("The Life of Red Hugh O'Donnell") by Lughaidh O Cleirigh. Although his posthumous reputation has been somewhat overshadowed by that of his ally Hugh O'Neill, his leaderhip and military and capabilites were considerable. His personality seems to have been particularly magnetic and contemporary sources are united in their praise of his oratorical ability. Irish (), a Goidelic language spoken in Ireland, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland, is an official language of the European Union, and has official recognition in Northern Ireland as well. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Signature page from the Annals of the Four Masters Entry for A.D. 432 The Annals of the Four Masters or the Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters are a chronicle of medieval Irish history. ...


In 1991, a plaque was erected at Simancas Castle in commemoration of Red Hugh O'Donnell, which was unveiled by Don Leopoldo Ó Donnell, Duque de Tetuan. Tétouan (Arabic: تطوان (meaning eyes in the Berber language)), also spelled Tetuan or sometimes Tettawen, is the capital and cultural centre of the region Tangier-Tétouan in the north of Morocco, the only open port of Morocco on the Mediterranean Sea, a few miles South of the Strait of...


Further reading

  • The Life of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, Prince of Tyrconnell (Beatha Aodh Rua O Domhnaill) by Lughaidh O'Cleirigh. Edited by Paul Walsh and Colm Ó Lochlainn. Irish Texts Society, vol. 42. Dublin: Educational Company of Ireland, 1948 (original Gaelic manuscript in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin).
  • Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland (Annála Ríoghachta Éireann) by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, compiled during the period 1632-1636 by Brother Michael O’Clery, translated and edited by John O'Donovan in 1856, and re-published in 1998 by De Burca, Dublin.
  • A View of the Legal Institutions, Honorary Hereditary Offices, and Feudal Baronies established in Ireland, by William Lynch, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, published by Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, Paternoster Row, London, 1830 (O’Donnell: page 190, remainder to Earl’s patent).
  • Vicissitudes of Families, by Sir Bernard Burke, Ulster King of Arms, published by Longman, Green, Longman and Roberts, Paternoster Row, London, 1861. (Chapter on O’Donnells, pages 125-148).
  • The Fate and Fortunes of the Earls of Tyrone (Hugh O’Neill) and Tyrconnel (Rory O’Donel), their flight from Ireland and death in exile, by the Rev. C. P. Meehan, M.R.I.A., 2nd edition, James Duffy, London, 1870.
  • Elizabeth's Irish Wars, by Cyril Falls, London, 1950.
  • Erin’s Blood Royal – The Gaelic Noble Dynasties of Ireland, by Peter Berresford Ellis, Constable, London, 1999, (pages 251-258 on the O’Donel, Prince of Tirconnell).

Popular Culture

Hugh O'Donnell serves as the main character in the 1966 Walt Disney feature film, The Fighting Prince of Donegal. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Walt Disney Company (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... The Fighting Prince of Donegal is a 1966 Walt Disney adventure film starring Peter McEnery and Susan Hampshire, based on the novel Red Hugh: Prince of Donegal by Robert T. Reilley. ...


Hugh O'Donnell is a major character in Brian Friel's play Making History. Brian Friel (born January 9, 1929) is a playwright and director from Northern Ireland. ...


See also

Irish Kings or monarchs ruled various kingdoms and territories in Ireland for much of her history. ... Tyrconnell can refer to: a territory in Ireland, now more commonly referred to as County Donegal (see Tír Conaill), although the Kingdom and later Principality of Tyrconnell was broader than that, including parts of Sligo, Leitrim (Republic of Ireland), and Fermanagh (United Kingdom). ... Kings of Tír Connaill from c. ... The Reformation, before which, in 1536, Henry VIII broke with Papal authority, fundamentally changed Ireland. ...

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