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Encyclopedia > Hugh Ike Shott

Hugh Ike Shott was a newspaper editor, pioneer broadcaster, and Republican politician in West Virginia. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party [1]), is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ...


He was born in Staunton, Virginia in 1866 and aprententiced as a printer. He moved to the then-booming new city of Bluefield, West Virginia. There he took control of the Bluefield Daily Telegraph, the city's primary morning newspaper. He, via straw parties, also controlled the "competing" evening Mountain Sunset Review. Street in downtown Staunton Staunton is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the state of Virginia. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Bluefield is a city located in Mercer County, West Virginia. ...


He was also involved in the railway mail service and was postmaster for several years. In that era, postmaster was a political appointment given by the President of the United States. If you are looking for different meanings of this word, see Postmaster (disambiguation) A postmaster is a term used in post offices to denote the head or master of the office. ... The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ...


He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1928 and re-elected in 1930. However he was defeated in 1932, and defeated for the United States Senate in 1936. House of Representatives is a name used for legislative bodies in many countries. ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1942 he was a candidate for the special Senate "short term" caused by the resignation of Matthew M. Neely. He won and served from November 18, 1942 to January 3, 1943. The election was almost honorary, as the Senate only met twice during his term of office. He was not a candidate in the regular election, held on the same day, for the following regular six-year term. He was referred to as "Senator" for the rest of his life, however. This article is about the year. ... Matthew Neely Matthew M. Neely (b. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years), with 43 remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ...


In broadcasting, he obtained the liscense for the only station, at the time, in Bluefield, WHIS, with the call letters standing for his initials, in 1928. In 1948 he obtained a companion FM station. Both continue in operation today. In radio (including television), a callsign or call sign (also call letters) is a unique designation for amateur, broadcast, and sometimes military radio use, as well as for broadcast television. ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM radio, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length...


His control of both daily newspapers and both of the primary radio stations gave him a virtual news monopoly in his area. His outlets were a bold pro-business and anti - New Deal voice. In economics, a monopoly (from the Greek monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a kind of product or service. ... The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. ...


He died in Bluefiled on October 12, 1953. October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


In 1955 his heirs obtained, by the only special exception ever granted by the Federal Communications Commission the only television station in the city, which likewise carried his WHIS initials. 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The FCCs official seal. ...


After extended litigation, the United States Supreme Court orderd that no one company could own both the primary AM and FM stations, the only TV station, and the only daily newspaper in the same town. WHIS-TV was sold and the call letters changed to WVVA in 1979. His name lives on in WHIS-AM, although it, also was later sold, as was the FM station, and several other radio stations he owned. Today none reflect his viewpoints. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Quincy Newspapers, Inc. ... 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ...



Preceded by:
Joseph Rosier
U.S. Senator from West Virginia
1942 - 1943
Succeeded by:
W. Chapman Revercomb


The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ... Chapman Revercomb William Chapman Revercomb (July 20, 1895 - October 6, 1979) was a politician and lawyer in the state of West Virginia. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
History of WHIS-TV/WVVA, Bluefield, West Virginia (7568 words)
With Scott Shott on hand to supervise the broadcast facilities in Bluefield, John was free to devote most of his time to the new operation in Florence.
The Shott family carries on the tradition of pioneering in mass communication with the inauguration of the newly erected TV station.
Both sons, Jim and Hugh, Jr., are prominent in carrying on the activities of the radio and TV stations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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